An online video chat with New York Rangers prospect K'Andre Miller was interrupted by a hacker that posted racial slurs.

Miller – who is African-American – was the 22nd overall pick in the 2018 NHL Draft and completed his sophomore season at Wisconsin.

The 20-year-old from St. Paul, Minnesota signed a three-year, $3.8million contract with the Rangers one day before the 2019-20 season was suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic.

It is unknown if Miller saw the derogatory message on the Zoom chat, but he finished the interview on Friday.

"We were incredibly appalled by this behavior, which has no place online, on the ice, or anywhere, and we are investigating the matter," the Rangers said in a statement.

The NHL also released a statement, which read: "The National Hockey League is appalled that the video call arranged today by the New York Rangers to introduce their fans to one of the league's incoming stars, K'Andre Miller, was hacked with racist, cowardly taunts.

"The person who committed this despicable act is in no way an NHL fan and not welcome in the hockey community.

"No one deserves to be subjected to such ugly treatment and it will not be tolerated in our league. We join the Rangers in condemning this disgusting behaviour."

Brooklyn Nets superstar and top seed Kevin Durant was upset in the opening round of the NBA 2K20 tournament on Friday.

With the NBA postponed amid the coronavirus pandemic, a charity tournament has been put together to raise money in support of COVID-19 relief efforts.

Winner of the single-elimination Xbox One tournament will receive $100,000 to give to charity, but Durant was a high-profile casualty on the opening day.

In the first matchup, two-time NBA champion Durant used the Los Angeles Clippers but lost to 16th seed and Miami Heat forward Derrick Jones Jr.

Jones' Milwaukee Bucks topped Durant's Clippers 78-62 to advance to the quarter-finals.

The tournament, aired on ESPN, will run through to April 11.

Milwaukee Bucks superstar Giannis Antetokounmpo has not been playing basketball during the NBA hiatus as he does not have access to a hoop at home.

The NBA suspended the season on March 11 amid the coronavirus pandemic, which has claimed more than 58,800 lives globally from over one million confirmed cases.

The United States has the highest number of cases – exceeding 275,800 – as basketballers and fellow professional athletes are forced to stay fit at home.

However, reigning NBA MVP Antetokounmpo has been unable play basketball within his Wisconsin house.

"So, I don't have access to hoop," Antetokounmpo said during a conference call on Friday.

"A lot of NBA players have a court in their house or something, but now I just get home workouts. Ride the bike, treadmill, lift weights and pretty much stay sharp that way, but I don't play basketball."

Antetokounmpo – whose Bucks were leading the NBA prior to the postponement – added: "Obviously, they give us bands, a bike. "They provide us with workouts that we can do at home and also provide us with food. They have a catering company that brings us food for us and our families in the house.

"That's pretty much it. We're supposed to stay home, do our workouts, take care of our bodies at home, and that's pretty much it."

"Spending time with your family is great," Antetokounmpo continued. "We don't get to do that a lot during the season, but at the end of the day, I know everybody in this group misses basketball. Everybody on the team misses playing basketball."

Joel Embiid and the Philadelphia 76ers have teamed up to donate $1.3million to Penn Medicine for critical support of healthcare workers fighting coronavirus.

COVID-19 has wreaked havoc globally, with more than one million confirmed cases and over 58,800 deaths.

Sport has also been brought to a standstill amid the coronavirus pandemic – the NBA among the leagues on hiatus around the world.

76ers All-Star Embiid, along with managing partner Josh Harris and co-managing partner David Blitzer made a significant contribution to the funding campaign for COVID-19 antibody testing of frontline healthcare workers, identifying those with potential immunity.

"During this pandemic, many doctors and nurses are working like soldiers on the front lines of a war and they need to be provided with as much armour as possible in this battle," Embiid said.

"COVID-19 antibody testing can help Philadelphia health care workers at this critical time, and we need to do everything possible to help those heroes who are putting their lives at risk to help us."

Harris added: "The only way for us to get through this terrible global crisis is to ensure a safe work environment for health care professionals and ultimately find a treatment for COVID-19. We are very proud to partner with the incredible team at Penn Medicine, who are tirelessly working towards this by identifying immunity in our brave doctors and nurses.

"Joel has been a leader in highlighting the urgent need for this kind of testing—David and I thank him for his leadership in this area and are excited to join forces with him. Our medical workers are on the frontlines of this crisis, have been hit hardest by it and need all the help and support we can give them. We have rough days ahead, but with collective action like this, together we will make it through."

University of Pennsylvania president Amy Gutmann said: "We are enormously grateful to Joel Embiid, Josh Harris, and David Blitzer for stepping up in a time of great need with forward-thinking philanthropy—helping us to understand COVID-19 through the lens of precision medicine.

"We will take this new and powerful knowledge about how our bodies react to the virus and use it to protect our healthcare heroes, sharing these lessons with the City of Philadelphia and across the world."

The city of Calgary has canceled all public events through to June 30 due to the coronavirus pandemic, dealing another blow to the already shrinking chances that the NHL can hold a full playoffs and award the Stanley Cup for the 2019-20 season.

Calgary mayor Naheed Nenshi announced the restrictions on Friday, preventing all public gatherings, including home games for the Calgary Flames and the Canadian Football League's Calgary Stampeders.

Even if the NHL were to resume the season before the end of June, the Flames would need to play their scheduled home games at neutral sites away from the Scotiabank Saddledome.

The Flames built a 36-27-7 record and were sitting in second place in the Pacific Division when the league suspended play due to the COVID-19 outbreak last month. The franchise has lost 12 of its last 14 playoff games and has not won a playoff series since the 2014-15 season.

The news comes a few days after the NHL extended its self-isolation policy to April 15, keeping team facilities closed to all employees, including players. The league had originally set a date of March 27 for players to self-quarantine before extending it twice.

Four players have tested positive for COVID-19 – two from the Ottawa Senators and two from the Colorado Avalanche.

Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly said last Friday that the NHL is still hopeful it can finish the regular season and play a full playoffs, even if it means playing the Stanley Cup Final in August.

 

 

Blaine Gabbert has returned to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and will compete to be named as Tom Brady's backup quarterback.

The 30-year-old was with the Bucs last year but suffered a dislocated shoulder in the preseason, meaning he did not see competitive action.

Ryan Griffin is the other QB on the roster after the departure of former number one overall pick Jameis Winston, who remains a free agent.

The Bucs confirmed the return of Gabbert on Friday, with his contract reportedly a fully guaranteed one-year deal.

Gabbert has 48 career starts in his NFL career, having previously represented the Jacksonville Jaguars, San Franciso 49ers, Arizona Cardinals and Tennessee Titans.

He was selected at number 10 in the first round of the 2011 draft by the Jags, and previously worked with Bucs head coach Bruce Arians in Arizona.

The free agency signing of Brady, who left the New England Patriots after 20 years, has the Bucs dreaming of a Super Bowl appearance at their home stadium at the conclusion of the 2020 season.

They have not reached the playoffs since 2007, but have a stellar cast of receiving talent to work with Brady.

Brady was this week allowed to claim his trademark number 12 jersey by previous holder Chris Godwin, while Gabbert will again wear 11.

FIFA's COVID-19 working group has recommended the postponement of all international matches due to be played in the June window.

The working group, which the world game's governing body recently established to address the consequences of the coronavirus pandemic, met for the first time via conference call on Friday.

They made a series of recommendations to the Bureau of the FIFA Council including the postponement of all men's and women's international fixtures for June.

All measures received unanimous agreement from the panel, including setting up "bilateral discussions with confederations concerning 2022 FIFA World Cup qualifiers" with the aim of finalising "a revised match schedule pending health and safety developments".

"FIFA would like to thank the positive contributions and cooperation of all Confederations' representatives and highlight the spirit of unity, solidarity and mutual understanding which culminated in the adoption of these decisions," read the organisation's statement.

"FIFA also reiterates that health must always be the first priority and the main criteria in any decision-making process, especially in these challenging times."

Friendlies scheduled for June include Spain taking on Portugal, Germany travelling to Switzerland and England hosting Romania.

Copa America and Euro 2020, both due to start later that month, have already been postponed for one year.

The French Football Federation (FFF) will delay any decision over the outcome of its leagues until containment measures in the country have been lifted.

With the coronavirus pandemic having put sport on lockdown across the globe, football in France is on an indefinite hiatus.

The FFF ruled out voiding the campaign, insisting that a season without promotion or relegation would defy "sporting logic".

In a statement released on Friday, the FFF identified several criteria that would factor into its decision over how and when to conclude the 2019-20 season.

"A resumption of competitions would not mean playing all the days that remain to be played to go to the end of the championships," it read.

"It is out of the question to impose an unrealistic pace of recovery, depending on the level of the championships, to make them go to completion.

"Partial completion of the season will be considered.

"The end date of the championships will logically depend on the level of competition."

The FFF confirmed that regional competitions must end by June 30, and added that the €86million budget allocated to amateur football will be maintained.

Nick Foles is excited by the prospect of competing to be the Chicago Bears' starting quarterback after the team confirmed they would hold an "open competition" at the position.

Former Super Bowl champion Foles was brought in by the Bears in a trade with the Jacksonville Jaguars in exchange for a fourth-round draft selection.

That move piled the pressure on incumbent starter Mitchell Trubisky, whose job is now under threat three years after he was drafted at number two overall by general manager Ryan Pace.

Foles, 31, has already spoken to Trubisky and hopes they can put the team first going into training camp. 

"The opportunity to be a full-time starter and do those things is something any player would love to do in the right situation," Foles told reporters. "It's an opportunity I'm excited for.

"Mitch and I have already talked and we want to start out on the right foot. Ultimately, it's all about what’s best for the Chicago Bears."

Pace and head coach Matt Nagy have praised the way Trubisky has taken to the challenge of Foles arrival.

"With the addition of Nick Foles it's exactly what we talked about from the start - we want to create competition," Pace said. 

"We've talked to both players and it's an open competition. We understand the focus is on the quarterback position.

"It's been a focus for us with the addition of Nick Foles. We've increased competition at a critical position, we talked to both players, and credit to both those guys for embracing it."

Nagy believes the blame for Trubisky being unable to hit the heights of other QBs in the early stages of his NFL career should be shared.

"What we're trying to do is what's best for the Chicago Bears, plain and simple," he said. "You could feel how much of a competitor Mitch is. He's embracing it and he's excited to get back to work.

"Part of the conversation we discussed, too, was understanding the big picture. I know Mitch gets a lot of this, but we could have been a lot better coaching, schematically. I could have been a better head coach.

"And then as we all know, we can all be better as players around him as well. That's the focus there.

"Mitch has had an unbelievable personality throughout it. All he wants to do is be the best quarterback he can be for the Chicago Bears.

"And when we walk in on the first day, whenever it is, Mitch will be first in the huddle."

The Montreal Canadiens and forward Laurent Dauphin agreed to terms on a one-year, two-way contract for the 2020-21 season on Friday.

Dauphin, acquired by Montreal from Nashville for forward Michael McCarron on January 7, will earn $200,000 guaranteed with a $700,000 salary at the NHL level and a $175,000 in the AHL.

The 25-year-old recorded 14 goals and 17 assists in 58 games with Laval and Milwaukee of the AHL this season, including seven goals and eight assists in 25 games with Laval following the trade.

A second-round pick of Arizona in the 2013 NHL draft, Dauphin appeared in 35 games with the Coyotes between 2015-19 and compiled three goals, one assist and 18 penalty minutes. 

His most extensive NHL action came in 2016-17, when the Quebec native registered two goals and one assist in 24 games. 

St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Miles Mikolas is on track to be ready for the team's delayed season opener as he continues his recovery from a forearm injury he sustained during spring training, general manager John Mozeliak has said.

Mozeliak, speaking at a teleconference with reporters on Thursday, said Mikolas has progressed to playing catch up to 120 feet and is close to being cleared for throwing a light bullpen session. 

The 2018 All-Star was briefly shut down during spring training after being diagnosed with a flexor tendon strain in his right forearm in February.

Mikolas had been slated to miss the start of the 2020 season prior to Major League Baseball's shutdown due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

The 31-year-old made 32 starts in each of his first two seasons with St. Louis after returning to the majors following a successful three-year stint in Japan, though he slipped to a 9-14 record and a 4.16 ERA in 2019 after going 18-4 with a 2.83 ERA the previous season.

Mozeliak also gave a positive report on reliever Andrew Miller, who made just one Grapefruit League appearance before games were suspended as he dealt with a lack of feel for his pitches. The veteran left-hander has been working out at his home in Tampa and barring any setbacks, figures to be ready if and when the season resumes.

Fellow reliever Brett Cecil, who strained his right hamstring during a Grapefruit League game on March 11, is expected to return to rehabilitation activities next week after taking some time off for personal reasons, according to Mozeliak.

Mozeliak added that the Cardinals' spring facility in Jupiter, Florida remains "basically closed" as the team complies with social distancing guidelines intended to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

"We do have a couple of players that are in the Jupiter area that are coming in for their medical rehab treatment," he said. "It's not business as usual. It's very quiet."

Anthony Joshua's world heavyweight title defence against Kubrat Pulev has been postponed amid the coronavirus pandemic.

IBF, WBA and WBO champion Joshua was due to fight Bulgarian Pulev at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium on June 20.

But the proliferation of COVID-19 has led to a decision to postpone the bout.

Joshua's promoters Matchroom confirmed the news on Friday and have begun working on a new date, with the prospect of hosting it at Spurs' ground still open.

Pulev and Joshua had previously been due to fight in 2017 but the challenger had to withdraw due to injury. After this delay, they now hope it will prove third time lucky.

"A new date for the event promoted by Matchroom Boxing and 258 Management in association with Top Rank and Epic Sports Entertainment is currently being worked on," read a statement from Matchroom.

"We will announce any updates in due course and continue to explore the possibility of hosting this fight at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium."

Earlier this week, the heavyweight fight between Dillian Whyte and Alexander Povetkin was called off, as was the clash between Oleksandr Usyk and Dereck Chisora.

The winners of those two bouts, which were both scheduled for May, would have been in the mix for world title fights against either the winner of Joshua's clash against Pulev, or the scheduled third meeting between WBC champion Tyson Fury and Deontay Wilder.

Joshua regained his titles by winning his rematch against Andy Ruiz Jr in Saudi Arabia on points.

That December victory came six months after the Briton had suffered shock stoppage defeat to Ruiz in New York.

Premier League clubs have agreed to consult their players about taking 30 per cent pay cuts due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The proliferation of COVID-19 has seen the majority of global sport grind to a halt, with a meeting of Premier League shareholders on Friday acknowledging England's top flight will not get back under way at the start of May.

Tottenham, Newcastle United, Norwich City and Bournemouth have placed at least part of their non-playing staff on furlough leave at the United Kingdom government's expense.

Health secretary Matt Hancock called on Premier League footballers to "take a pay cut and play their part", with the Professional Footballers' Association (PFA) attracting criticism for a lack of action in agreeing such measures.

However, clubs will now approach their players about reducing their salaries while football is on hiatus.

A Premier League statement read: "The sporting and financial implications for Premier League clubs as well as for the FA, EFL and National League were considered at today's meeting.

"In the face of substantial and continuing losses for the 2019- 20 season since the suspension of matches began, and to protect employment throughout the professional game, Premier League clubs unanimously agreed to consult their players regarding a combination of conditional reductions and deferrals amounting to 30 per cent of total annual remuneration.

"This guidance will be kept under constant review as circumstances change. The League will be in regular contact with the PFA and the union will join a meeting which will be held tomorrow between the League, players and club representatives."

The Premier League also announced that £125million would be advanced to the EFL and National League due to the "severe difficulties clubs throughout the football pyramid are suffering at this time".

All leagues overseen by the EFL and National League have been suspended indefinitely.

An additional £20m has been committed to support the NHS, communities, families and vulnerable groups during the pandemic.

"This includes a direct financial contribution to the NHS and funds to enable clubs to refocus their efforts and develop significant outreach programmes to help communities, including those most in need. This funding will enable both immediate and longer-term support during the crisis," the statement read.

"In response to COVID-19, Premier League clubs have been supporting tens of thousands of people in their communities each and every day through targeted activity including donations to foodbanks, telephone calls to the elderly, food parcels delivered to the vulnerable and a wide range of free resources to support wellbeing and education.

"Many Premier League clubs are also working closely with their local NHS Trusts to provide valuable support through the provision of resources, volunteers and facilities. Now, more than ever, clubs are playing a vital role to support the wellbeing of those in their communities and alleviate pressure on critical health services.

"Working closely with the Department of Health and Social Care, Public Health England and the NHS, the wide reach and appeal of the Premier League and our clubs will continue to be used to promote important public health messaging throughout this crisis.

"The Premier League would like to reiterate that the thoughts of all our clubs are with all those directly affected by COVID-19​."

Simona Halep is saddened by the cancellation of this year's Wimbledon, but described the honour of being defending women's singles champion for two years as "rare and special".

Wimbledon was this week cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic, which has spread to over a million people worldwide.

It will mark the first time since World War Two that the grass-court grand slam has not been held.

Halep clinched her second major title at the All England Club last year, crushing Serena Williams in straight sets in the final.

In an interview with The Times, she said of not being able to defend her title this year: "Even though the cancellation of Wimbledon felt inevitable after the past few weeks, I had hoped it might somehow find a way to stay on the calendar as it is such a special tournament.

"So Wednesday was a sad day and I thought back to some of the happiest emotions of my life last year at the All England Club.

"I will miss going back to see Centre Court, the scene of that amazing final last year. I will miss seeing my name on the wall and all the nice things you get as a member of the club. I will miss the grass, a surface I finally fell in love with.

"I will miss wearing white. And I will miss the feeling of belonging as part of the huge tradition that Wimbledon represents.

"I know that Wimbledon looked at other opportunities to stage the championships. They looked at playing without spectators and postponing, but none of these options worked because of the nature of the surface and the high number of people involved. It makes sense to call it off now so that we are all mentally prepared for it, rather than to wait and let people down at the last minute.

"The club sent me a nice email on Wednesday. I had previously been discussing with them the prospect of doing some filming as the defending champion in the lead-up to the tournament. Hopefully we can do those things next year instead.

"In a positive way, I will have the rare and special honour of being a reigning Wimbledon champion for two years. I love the tradition in which the defending champion gets to open play on Centre Court, so I hope I can still do that next year as that will be something to savour."

The ATP and WTA Tours are both suspended and Wimbledon's cancellation has led to talk of the rest of the 2020 season being wiped out.

"The virus is like nothing we have ever faced before, and it's important to remember that tennis is not important in comparison to this life-threatening opponent," added Halep.

"At this point, I do not want to speculate on whether the remainder of the 2020 season will be shut down. We have to see clear signs that the virus is under control.

"We have to let our governments and medical staff do their jobs, and when life starts returning to normal, then we can start to think about tennis."

The Ryder Cup should not be held this year if it reaches a stage where captains choose all 12 players and fans are unable to attend, according to Chris DiMarco.

Golf's calendar has been decimated by the coronavirus pandemic with the PGA and European Tours suspended, while the Masters and US PGA Championship have been postponed.

It appears certain the U.S. Open and The Open will follow suit and the Ryder Cup, scheduled to take place at Whistling Straits between September 25-27, is also under threat.

This week, Europe captain Padraig Harrington insisted the biennial competition should go ahead if it is safe even if it meant he had to pick his entire team.

DiMarco twice represented the United States in golf's most prestigious team event, ensuring his qualification for the team in 2004 with a runner-up showing at the US PGA Championship, which coincidentally was also hosted at Whistling Straits.

And DiMarco believes points should be retained and carried over to a qualification process for a Ryder Cup taking place in 2021.

"No, I don't think that either," DiMarco told Stats Perform when asked if the event should proceed even if the captains had to choose all 12 players.

"[For me], the most important thing at the 2004 US PGA was to make that Ryder Cup team. 

"I just think if it gets cancelled this year and they play it in 2021, the points should just continue for another year and just keep it continuing, nobody can pick this year and then just go as if it was a three-year qualification. 

"That's the fairest for everybody and I think that way the guys who have played great get to keep their points and it still gives guys a chance to make that team. 

"I think the eight players who qualify and the four captain's picks, that's the way it should be."

Harrington has also advocated playing the Ryder Cup behind closed doors if it is deemed unsafe for spectators to attend.

However, DiMarco feels having fans in attendance is crucial, not least because it gives the home side an advantage.

"I don't think the Ryder Cup should be played without fans, I think it's a disservice," added DiMarco, who also played for USA in 2006. 

"I get the other tournaments, I guess you can say it is what it is. But it wouldn't be fair to the home team the fact they wouldn't be allowed to have fans. 

"So, I think as big as the Ryder Cup is the fans are as big a part of that as anything. Yes, it's 24 players and the captains and the co-captains and all that and they can go out and do it, but without those roars you hear around the course it just wouldn't be the same. I think it's the one thing [in golf] – [American] football is the same, you can't watch a football game without fans you just can't do it. 

"The Ryder Cup has to have its fans there, when it's on home turf you have to have that home-field advantage and the fans are that home-field advantage. 

"If it comes to that point where they say there won't be any fans I don't think it should be played."

Andros Townsend has accused British politicians of "deflecting blame" on to footballers after they were urged by government officials to take a pay cut during the coronavirus pandemic.

Football is at a standstill across the world due to COVID-19, increasing the threat of financial problems for many clubs as they are unable to take in gate receipts as a way of income.

Some Premier League clubs have opted to make use of the government's furlough scheme, which leaves the state covering up to 80 per cent of wages to a maximum of £2,500 per month.

But utilising this has opened clubs up to criticism, with many people questioning why the British taxpayer is supporting top-level football teams when non-playing staff wages could be offset by high-earning players taking a temporary wage cut.

Sadiq Khan, Mayor of London, suggested Premier League footballers should "carry the greatest burden", while Julian Knight – chair of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee – said the clubs are existing in a "moral vacuum".

But arguably the most high-profile critic was health secretary Matt Hancock, who, while leading the government's daily televised briefing on Thursday, said "the first thing Premier League footballers can do is make a contribution".

Crystal Palace winger Townsend, however, believes footballers are being used as "easy targets" during the crisis.

"Football is trying to do a lot of good. To wake up yesterday and see footballers being painted as villains was a bit of a surprise to be honest," he told talkSPORT.

"I have never been more proud to be a footballer. Since this crisis started to see the work that the players and clubs have done in the community. At Palace, we have helped out the homeless, donated to local charities.

"Individual players are thinking about ways which they can help. I am involved in a campaign, Football United, raising money for the emergency trust. Marcus Rashford has helped feed over 400,000 school children in Manchester.

"The health secretary, deflecting blame onto footballers, I don't think that is right. His job is the responsibility of NHS workers. He is coming out and deflecting onto the easy targets, the footballers, and that doesn't sit right with me.

"We do have a responsibility, but we are giving back to the community and rightly so. We are in a very privileged position. The community effectively pay our wages. At a time like this we need to give back."

Part of the blame for the perceived lack of action by footballers and clubs has been laid at the door of the Professional Footballers' Association (PFA).

But Townsend insists the union is acting behind the scenes and reminds detractors that there is no benefit to players' wages being cut or deferred if the club can actually afford to pay non-playing staff.

"We received an email two days ago from the PFA which said until they have all the information from clubs, not to be pressured into agreeing anything," he added. "What that means is, until clubs have shown them financial details, until they know whether clubs can continue to pay non-playing staff, to not agree anything.

"If the players end up agreeing to a pay cut or deferral and a few days later the PFA find out that these clubs can continue to pay non-playing staff and are choosing not to, then who benefits? The NHS are not benefiting, these heroes are not benefiting.

"If the clubs can continue to pay them [non-playing staff] and are choosing not to, then it is only those clubs that are benefiting. The PFA is doing its job. They are making sure that these clubs can continue to pay non-playing staff before any decision is made."

The Kansas City Chiefs have signed wide receiver Sammy Watkins to a new one-year deal.

Watkins was not a free agent but there was speculation over his future with the team with him due to count $21million against the salary cap in the final year of his previous contract.

However, the Chiefs and Watkins have agreed to a restructure that will keep him with the Super Bowl champions while giving them a much-needed cap saving of around $5m.

Watkins, 26, can earn up to $16m in the terms of his new deal, though his base salary has been reduced from $13.75m to $9m, with $7m available to him in incentives.

He will count $16m against the cap with his new deal, a figure which also includes $7m from his original signing bonus.

Confirming the deal on Twitter, Watkins posted: "I'm back KC LETS GET IT..! #RUNITBACKTOUR".

Watkins played a crucial role in the Chiefs' Super Bowl LIV triumph last season, catching 14 of his 18 targets in the postseason for 288 yards and a touchdown.

His most important contribution came on a 38-yard catch in the fourth quarter of the Super Bowl, which set up Damien Williams' go-ahead touchdown in their 31-20 comeback win over the San Francisco 49ers.

 

Milan have reached the €500,000 mark in donations for their coronavirus fundraiser.

The Serie A club set up a GoFundMe page with local charity Fondazione Milan with the aim of gathering support for the Azienda Regionale Emergenza Urgenza (AREU), the emergency arm for the government in the Lombardy region.

Italy has been one of the worst-affected nations during the COVID-19 pandemic, with more than 115,000 confirmed cases and over 13,500 deaths related to the virus.

Only the United States and Spain have had more confirmed positive tests during the global health crisis.

Milan and Fondazione Milan got the ball rolling with an initial donation of €250,000, which paid for six AREU medical cars, before asking others to pledge to the cause as they set a €500,000 target.

With over 1,000 donors, they reached that goal on Friday.

Juventus began a similar initiative two days after Milan, with the club and players making an opening contribution of €300,000 towards a €1million aim.

As of Friday, Juve's fundraiser has amassed a total of almost €457,000 in donations.

Italy's football season has been suspended indefinitely due to coronavirus, with prime minister Giuseppe Conte banning clubs from returning to training before April 13 at the earliest.

Ben Ainslie expects athletes set to compete at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo will be relieved by the postponement.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has pushed the Games back by 12 months due to the spread of coronavirus, which has infected over a million people worldwide.

Sailor Ainslie, a four-time Olympic champion, has backed the decision and feels competitors will be grateful for the clarity the switch brings.

He told Stats Perform: "If you were in the IOC's position and Tokyo's position it must have been an incredibly tough decision when you think about the scheduling, the preparations, dare I say it the commercial impact, although that shouldn't really be the main consideration I'm sure it would have been a big consideration.

"The fact they came to a decision relatively early, I think they deserve some credit for that.  

“I think it was absolutely the right decision. It was clearly going to be a massive risk as planned. Then if you look at a six-month delay, you're competing in the middle of the winter in Japan which isn't going to work for a lot of sports, so I absolutely agree with the decision.

"What does it mean for the athletes and competitors? I think most of them, frankly, will just be relieved there's certainty.

"It would have been a massive risk if they'd tried to continue and gambled on the virus clearing away in time for the games.

"So, I think there'll be relief and they'll start now planning what does the next 18 months look like for them in terms of their programme.

"We talk a lot about peaking in sport. They would have all been working up to peaking this summer. Now they are probably going to have to, not take their foot off the gas, but they're going to have to reschedule their programmes to make sure that they're then ramping back up for the games.

"Also, what will the event schedule look like next year? It's unlikely there'll be that many events for the rest of this year, so how do they get their race practice up in 2021?

"So, some challenges there, but if I were an Olympian I'd frankly be bloody relieved they've come to the right decision and it was going ahead still." 

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