Gardiner opens with 44.42, Knight wins 400m hurdles on good day for Caribbean athletes at USATF Bermuda Grand Prix

By May 21, 2023

Olympic 400m champion Steven Gardiner laid down the gauntlet for the world’s quarter-milers on Sunday when he won his season opener in impressive fashion at the USATF Bermuda Grand Prix.

The Bahamian, who was unable to defend his world title in Oregon last year because of foot injury, showed that he was back to his best, winning in in 44.42, the third fastest time in the world this year. No other competitor was close as compatriot Alonzo Russell was almost a second behind in 45.24.

Jamaica’s Javon Francis ran a season-best 45.81 for fourth with compatriot Demish Gaye fifth in 45.92.

Puerto Rico’s Gabby Scott won the 400m in 51.65 with the USA’s Courtney Okolo making a late move to snatch second in 52.23 ahead of Jamaica’s Candace McLeod who was third in 52.30.

The 100m races delivered in the expected excitement.

Christian Coleman took advantage of a bullet start to win the 100m final in a windy 9.78 (3.8 m/s). Noah Lyles surged late to get by Ackeem Blake to finish second in 9.80 with the Jamaican Blake taking third in 9.87.

Kadrian Goldson won the Men’s B final in a wind-aided 9.96 (3.8m/s) ahead of compatriot Michael Campbell 10.11 with the USA’s Chris Royster third in 10.21.

The Women’s 100m was also a thrilling affair won by the USA’s Tamari Davis in 10.91 with Jamaica’s Sashalee Forbes running a lifetime best of 10.98 for second place. Celera Barnes of the USA ran a season-best of 11.01 for third place.

Kemba Nelson was fifth in a season-best 11.14.

Shannon Ray won the Women’s ‘B’ final in 11.04 (2.7m/s) over Ashley Henderson (11.12) and Jamaica’s Remona Burchell (11.15). Jonielle Smith (11.18).

Earlier, Andrenette Knight set the tone for Caribbean athletes when she won the 400m hurdles in 54.90s in what was a Jamaican 1-3-4.

Knight, 26, who’s time was a season best, took the lead from the USAs Anna Cockrell at the sixth hurdle and never relinquished it holding off a late challenge from Cassandra Tate of the USA who finished in 55.06.

Shian Salmon ran a season-best 55.56 for third place with Rhonda Whyte fourth in the same time. Salmon got third by virtue of stopping the clock at 55.551 to Whyte’s 55.556.

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn won the 100m hurdles in 12.17 aided by a 3.5m/s wind. Finishing second was Jamaica’s Danielle Williams, who clocked 12.38 while the USA’s Tonea Marshall third in 12.39. Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper was fourth in 12.47.

Jamal Britt of the USA won the 110m hurdles in 12.99 (4.0 m/s). Eric Edwards finished second in 13.07 with Freddie Crittenden third in 13.13 in a USA 1-2-3. Tyler Mason (13.30) and Damion Thomas (13.38) were fourth and fifth, respectively.

First-year pro, Abby Steiner outclassed the field to win the 200m in 22.06 holding off Bahamian Anthonique Strachan (22.34) was second while Mackenzie Dunmore was third in 22.50. Jamaica’s Ashanti Moore was fourth in 22.78.

 In a dramatic conclusion to the Women’s long jump, Tara Davis-Woodhall leaped out to a wind-aided 7.11m to win over rival Quanesha Burks, whose 7.04m had in her the lead until Davis-Woodhall’s final jump.

Ruth Osoro of Nigeria jumped a personal best 6.82m for third place.

Will Claye won the triple jump with 17.45m over compatriot Donald Scott, who’s effort of 17.06m was the same as Jamaica’s Jordan Scott but was better on the countback.

A Jamaican women’s team of Remona Burchell, Ashanti Moore, Sashalee Forbes and Jonielle Smith won the 4x100m relay in 42.80 in a blanket finish with USA Red (42.83) and USA Blue (42.87).

The USA’s Men’s team of Christian Coleman, Kendall Williams, Josephus Lyles and Terrance Laird won the men’s sprint relay in 38.21 over USA Blue (38.81) and Jamaica – Damion Thomas, Kadrian Goldson, Jevaughn Whyte and Michael Campbell – was third in 39.51.

 

 

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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