Elaine Thompson-Herah ran a massive season-best of 10.84s to win the 100m dash at the Diamond League meeting in Brussels on Friday.

Struggling for form primarily because of injury throughout most of the season, the double-double Olympic champion ran her best race this season with a commanding performance that would have inspired confidence that she is finally getting back to her best.

In her devastating wake was compatriot Natasha Morrison, who ran a season’s best 10.95 for second place. Great Britain’s Dina Asher Smith was third in 10.97.

Sashalee Forbes was fifth in 11.17.

This was Thompson-Herah’s third season best time in as many races after running 10.92 in Switzerland on September 4, which followed an 11.00 clocking on August 31.

 

Jamaica’s Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, the Honourable Olivia Grange, has praised Shelly Ann Fraser-Pryce for her tenacity and inner strength that, after suffering an injury, allowed her to finish her leg of the 4×100m relay Saturday to help Jamaica to get the silver medal at the World Championships in Budapest.

Running on the back-stretch, Fraser-Pryce reported suffered a hamstring strain early into the leg but risking even greater injury, still managed to get the baton to Sashalee Forbes so that Jamaica was able to complete the relay.

Put in a disadvantageous position, Shericka Jackson on anchor was unable to overhaul 100m champion Sha’Carri Richardson on the anchor leg.

The Jamaican minister, who is in Budapest, was impressed by Fraser-Pryce’s courage in the face of great personal injury.

 "Shelly, regarded by many as the greatest woman sprinter of all time, demonstrated another aspect of her greatness today (Saturday) when she suffered a muscle strain during the race but pushed on in spite of to safely hand off the baton, ensuring our medal,” the minister said.

"All of Jamaica hails you Shelly and we are grateful for your feat of seeing it through for the country despite the pain you must have been feeling. We are praying for your full and speedy recovery."

Following the race, Fraser-Pryce’s teammates rushed to the medical facility to support the veteran sprinter, who despite nursing a knee injury won bronze in the 100m final on last Monday to win her 15th medal at the World Championships.

The relay silver medal is her 16th and makes her Jamaica’s most decorated athlete – male or female – at the championships that began in 1983.

 

Defending champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Shericka Jackson and Julien Alfred all turned in impressive opening runs to advance to the semi-finals of the Women’s 100m dash at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary on Sunday.

American upstart Sha’Carri Richardson and the ever-improving Marie Josee Ta Lou of the Ivory Coast also demonstrated their immense talents setting up what is expected to be an intense semi-final round and an electrifying final on Monday.

Fraser-Pryce, who is going for a record-extending sixth world 100m title allayed fears about the impact of her injured knee, blasted out of the blocks but did not engage the after-burners as she cruised through the line in 11.01.

Swiss champion Mujinga Kambundji who has had her own issues with injury this season, came in second in 11.08. New Zealand’s fastest woman Zoe Hobbs advanced to the semis finishing third in 11.14.

 In similar fashion, Jackson the 2022 silver medalist, cruised to victory in Heat 4 in 11.06. Trinidad and Tobago’s veteran Michelle Lee Ahye took second place in a season’s best 11.16 with Germany’s Gina Lukenkemper third in 11.21.

Alfred, the NCAA champion, shook off her rust by winning her heat in 10.99 while holding off Great Britain’s Daryll Neita, who clocked 11.03 for second place. Gambia’s Gina Bass was third in 11.10.

Meanwhile, the USA’s gold medal hopeful ShaCarri Richardson cruised to an easy win in her heat stopping the clock in 10.92 with Jamaica’s Natasha Morrison 11.02 trailing in her wake. Italy’s Daynab Dosso ran a national record 11.14 to finish third and also advance to the semi-finals.

Ta Lou, who has run a lifetime best of 10.75 this season, let it known that she has no intention of being a bridesmaid at these championships, when she cruised to an easy time of 11.08 to win her heat ahead of Jamaica’s Sashalee Forbes, who clocked in at 11.12.

Buoyed by the cheers of her home crowd, Hungary’s Boglárka Takacs, finished third in 11.18.

Britanny Brown of the USA won her heat in 11.01 ahead of Great Britain's medal hopeful Dina Asher-Smith and Jaël Bestue of Spain who clocked 11.28.

Polish sprint star Ewa Swoboda also turned in an impressive performance storming to a 10.98 run to win her heat ahead of the USA’s Tamari Davis (11.06) and N'Ketia Seedo of the Netherlands, who clocked in at 11.11, a new personal best.

 

 

Sasha Lee Forbes’ purple patch was extended on Wednesday when she won the 100m dash at the P-T-S Meeting in Slovakia.

Running in lane six, the 27-year-old Jamaican, who ran a personal best 10.96 to finish in second place at the recent Jamaica National Athletics Championships in Kingston, outclassed the field, winning in 11.10. Hungary’s Boglarka Takacs was almost a full 0.1 seconds behind, clocking in at 11.19 to take second place. Finishing third was the Slovak Republic’s Viktoria Forster, who established a new national record of 11.26.

Forbes was not the only Jamaican on the podium as Javon Francis finished third in the 400m. The World Championship relay silver medalist clocked a creditable 45.87 behind Frenchman Gilles Birron who ran 45.49 for victory.

Runner-up Patrik Sorm of the Czech Republic ran a season’s best 45.75.

Meanwhile, Adelle Tracey continues to show progress this season with a new season-best time of 2:00.40 to finish third in the 800m race that was won by Anita Horvat in 1:59.91.

Ethiopia’s Hirut Meshesha took second place, running a time of 2:00.24.

 

In a remarkable display of resilience and determination, Olympic relay gold medallist, Briana Williams, defied the odds and made a triumphant comeback at the Jamaica National Athletics Championships on Friday night.

Despite battling injuries throughout the season, she managed to finish fourth in the highly competitive 100m race, clocking in at a season's best time of 11.01 seconds.

The race was dominated by some of Jamaica's finest sprinters, with Shericka Jackson leading the pack and setting a world-leading time of 10.65 seconds to claim victory. Sashalee Forbes, who achieved a personal best of 10.96 seconds, secured second place, closely followed by Natasha Morrison in third place with a time of 10.98 seconds.

For Williams, this achievement was nothing short of miraculous. Just a week prior, her hopes of participating in the trials seemed bleak after suffering an injury. However, through the relentless efforts of the staff at the YB Rehabilitation Centre, she made a remarkable recovery, defying the odds to secure a spot on Jamaica's team for the upcoming World Athletics Championships in Budapest.

In a post-race interview, Williams expressed her gratitude, acknowledging the support she received during her challenging journey. "Last week, the unbelievable happened to me, and I wasn't even sure if I was going to run at trials this week. The YB Rehabilitation Center worked tirelessly on me, and I just want to thank God that I made it out here and was able to run all three healthy races," she revealed.

 While the fourth-place finish may not have been her ultimate goal, Williams remained positive, focusing on the progress she had made despite the setbacks.

"The season's not over. I still have more personal bests to run, but I just want to thank God that I still made the team," she said, emphasizing her determination to continue improving.

The Olympic relay gold medallist also highlighted the improvements in her race execution, crediting her coaches at Titans International for their unwavering support and guidance. She acknowledged the hard work they put into refining her performance and expressed confidence in her increased strength compared to the previous year.

“Definitely a lot stronger than last year. Just a few more things to work on and just focused on being healthy for the rest of the season so I can get lower my times each race.

“Right now it's going well. I'm just happy that I made it without feeling it (the hamstring) and I'm so grateful.”

After changing coaches in the off season, switching from Ato Boldon in Miramar Florida to Titans International Track Club in Kingston, Briana Williams struggled for form this season. Acclimatizing to a new programmes and battling injuries, the Olympic relay gold medallist has been underwhelming for much of the current season.

With that in mind, she would have been pleased with her performance at the JAAA Budapest Quest Meet at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday night. The 21-year-old Williams uncorked a season-best 11.04 to emerge the victor in the 100m that was run over seven sections.

The time represented a significant drop from her previous best of 11.21 run on June 10 at the same venue. Second overall was Kemba Nelson, who clocked 11.18 while Remona Burchell was third fastest with a time of 11.20.

The Men’s 100m was run over an exhausting 14 sections but in the end Zharnel Hughes produced a strong finish to win his section in 10.00 ahead of the in-form Ackeem Blake, who was timed in 10.07. Promising youngster, De’ Andre Daley clocked a quick 10.08 to be third overall.

Stacey-Ann Williams was the quickest in the 400m winning her section of four in 51.08 with Tovea Jenkins second overall in 52.15. Two years ago, Candice McLeod was on fire running a number of sub-50-second times including a personal best of 49.51 to finish fourth in the 2020 Olympic finals.

Things have not been the same this season. Seemingly struggling to regain the form from 2021, McLeod once again came up short finishing third in 52.66.

Rasheed Dwyer was the quickest in the 200m with 20.57 with Antonio Watson second with 20.63. Bryan Levell was third best in 20.71.

Sashalee Forbes won the women’s event in 23.25 over Jodean Williams (23.75) and Ashley Williams 24.12.

Malik James-King ran 49.67 in the 400m hurdles while Lushane Wilson and Christoff Bryan both cleared 2.20m in the high jump with Wilson being better on the countback to take victory.

Olympic 400m champion Steven Gardiner laid down the gauntlet for the world’s quarter-milers on Sunday when he won his season opener in impressive fashion at the USATF Bermuda Grand Prix.

The Bahamian, who was unable to defend his world title in Oregon last year because of foot injury, showed that he was back to his best, winning in in 44.42, the third fastest time in the world this year. No other competitor was close as compatriot Alonzo Russell was almost a second behind in 45.24.

Jamaica’s Javon Francis ran a season-best 45.81 for fourth with compatriot Demish Gaye fifth in 45.92.

Puerto Rico’s Gabby Scott won the 400m in 51.65 with the USA’s Courtney Okolo making a late move to snatch second in 52.23 ahead of Jamaica’s Candace McLeod who was third in 52.30.

The 100m races delivered in the expected excitement.

Christian Coleman took advantage of a bullet start to win the 100m final in a windy 9.78 (3.8 m/s). Noah Lyles surged late to get by Ackeem Blake to finish second in 9.80 with the Jamaican Blake taking third in 9.87.

Kadrian Goldson won the Men’s B final in a wind-aided 9.96 (3.8m/s) ahead of compatriot Michael Campbell 10.11 with the USA’s Chris Royster third in 10.21.

The Women’s 100m was also a thrilling affair won by the USA’s Tamari Davis in 10.91 with Jamaica’s Sashalee Forbes running a lifetime best of 10.98 for second place. Celera Barnes of the USA ran a season-best of 11.01 for third place.

Kemba Nelson was fifth in a season-best 11.14.

Shannon Ray won the Women’s ‘B’ final in 11.04 (2.7m/s) over Ashley Henderson (11.12) and Jamaica’s Remona Burchell (11.15). Jonielle Smith (11.18).

Earlier, Andrenette Knight set the tone for Caribbean athletes when she won the 400m hurdles in 54.90s in what was a Jamaican 1-3-4.

Knight, 26, who’s time was a season best, took the lead from the USAs Anna Cockrell at the sixth hurdle and never relinquished it holding off a late challenge from Cassandra Tate of the USA who finished in 55.06.

Shian Salmon ran a season-best 55.56 for third place with Rhonda Whyte fourth in the same time. Salmon got third by virtue of stopping the clock at 55.551 to Whyte’s 55.556.

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn won the 100m hurdles in 12.17 aided by a 3.5m/s wind. Finishing second was Jamaica’s Danielle Williams, who clocked 12.38 while the USA’s Tonea Marshall third in 12.39. Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper was fourth in 12.47.

Jamal Britt of the USA won the 110m hurdles in 12.99 (4.0 m/s). Eric Edwards finished second in 13.07 with Freddie Crittenden third in 13.13 in a USA 1-2-3. Tyler Mason (13.30) and Damion Thomas (13.38) were fourth and fifth, respectively.

First-year pro, Abby Steiner outclassed the field to win the 200m in 22.06 holding off Bahamian Anthonique Strachan (22.34) was second while Mackenzie Dunmore was third in 22.50. Jamaica’s Ashanti Moore was fourth in 22.78.

 In a dramatic conclusion to the Women’s long jump, Tara Davis-Woodhall leaped out to a wind-aided 7.11m to win over rival Quanesha Burks, whose 7.04m had in her the lead until Davis-Woodhall’s final jump.

Ruth Osoro of Nigeria jumped a personal best 6.82m for third place.

Will Claye won the triple jump with 17.45m over compatriot Donald Scott, who’s effort of 17.06m was the same as Jamaica’s Jordan Scott but was better on the countback.

A Jamaican women’s team of Remona Burchell, Ashanti Moore, Sashalee Forbes and Jonielle Smith won the 4x100m relay in 42.80 in a blanket finish with USA Red (42.83) and USA Blue (42.87).

The USA’s Men’s team of Christian Coleman, Kendall Williams, Josephus Lyles and Terrance Laird won the men’s sprint relay in 38.21 over USA Blue (38.81) and Jamaica – Damion Thomas, Kadrian Goldson, Jevaughn Whyte and Michael Campbell – was third in 39.51.

 

 

 

 

Shashalee Forbes and Ackeem Blake won their respective 60m races at the first meet in the JAAA/SDF Jubilee at Kingston’s National Stadium on Saturday.

Forbes, 25, the 2017 World University Games 100m champion, clocked a time of 7.16 running into a negligible wind of 0.2 m/s to edge Anthonique Strachan (7.17). Tokyo Olympics gold medallist Natasha Morrison finished third in 7.27.

Blake, meanwhile, clocked a decent 6.61 to defeat Kishane Thompson, who ran 6.67, the same time as Michael Campbell, who is making his way back from a horrific injury to his spine in a motor vehicle accident in late 2017.

In a battle between Olympic bronze medallists over 200m, Tiffany James got the better of Candace McLeod. James ran 23.85 to claim victory over McLeod who ran 24.06. Michae Harriott finished third in 25.17.

Zandrion Barnes won the men’s 400m in 45.99, well clear of Malik James King who ran a pedestrian 46.67 while Terry Thomas was third in 46.99.

In the field, the Julian Robinson-coached pair of Shadae Lawrence and Traves Smikle won the women and men’s discus competitions, respectively.

Lawrence, who made her first Olympic final in Tokyo last year, threw 62.56m to comfortably win her event ahead of Samantha Hall, who had a best throw of 55.65m. Cedricka Williams threw 53.38 for third.

Meanwhile, Smikle, her Reckless Control training partner uncorked a throw of 64.65m for victory over Chad Wright, who mustered 58.02m for second place. Moses Parkinson managed 46.80m for third.

Tissanna Hickling won the long jump with a decent effort of 6.43m. Jodian Stewart was second with her best jump of 6.31m.

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