Newly-minted World record holder for the women’s 60 metres hurdles, Devynne Charlton, headlines a six-member team selected by The Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA) to represent the island at the upcoming World Athletics Indoor Championships in Glasgow, Scotland.

Anthonique Strachan, Charisma Taylor, Ken Mullings, LaQuan Nairn and Alonzo Russell, are the others that will fly the Bahamian flag at the event scheduled for March 1-3.

Charlton is overwhelmingly favoured for the gold, given her smashing world record run of 7.67 seconds during the 116th running of the Millrose Games at the Nike Track and Field Center in New York City, last Sunday.

In addition to Charlton’s pursuit of global gold, Strachan will go after a medal in the women’s 60m, Taylor will contest two events – the women’s triple jump and she will join Charlton in the hurdles. Mullings will try his hand in the men’s indoor heptathlon, with Nairn set to soar in the men’s long jump, while Russell will compete in the men’s 400m.

Veteran high jumper Donald Thomas could be added to the team, pending an invitation from World Athletics.

Demarius Cash, who will serve as head coach/manager of a major senior team for the first time, has high expectations.

“Based on what Devynne was able to do on Sunday, a lot of the athletes are excited and ready to go. There is nothing like when one of your colleagues does something special like this and running a world record is as exciting as it comes in track and field,” Cash said.

“What Devynne did, speaks volumes for where we are in track and field as a nation. This is a very exciting time for us, and I believe Bahamians will be pleased by the performances of these athletes at the world indoors. I believe we could bring home some hardware,” he added.

Russell, who was a part of the silver medal winning 4x400m relay team at the 2016 Championships, and Charlton, who won silver in the women’s 60m hurdles in Belgrade, two years ago, are the only World Indoor medallists on the team.

However, Charlton is not the only world leader on the team. Mullings has a world leading mark of 6,340 points in the indoor heptathlon. He scored that national record at the Illini Challenge at the University of Illinois in Champaign, in January.

“This would be the first time that we would have had an athlete going into the World Indoor Championships as the world leader in the multi events. This is great for Ken and it’s going to be a good challenge for him. I believe he will step up to the plate and do well,” said Cash.

The team will no doubt be led by Charlton though. Cash said she appears to be in the right frame of mind, and shape, to win gold this time around.

“She’s a special athlete and I believe there is a lot more in store for her this season. From the management side, I’m ready for the challenge. I’m here to work for the athletes and make sure they are prepared for everything.

“I believe this is going to be a high intensity meet for The Bahamas. I just want to thank the BAAA, and the executive team of the BAAA, for the opportunity to serve as head coach and manager. I’m looking forward to the challenge,” Cash ended.

Day one at the 2024 Tyson Invitational in Fayetteville, Arkansas on Friday saw a number of Caribbean athletes producing excellent performances.

Perhaps the best performance on the day came from 2022 Commonwealth 110m hurdles champion Rasheed Broadbell.

The 23-year-old produced a personal best 7.56 to take the men’s 60m hurdles ahead of countryman Tyler Mason who ran a personal best 7.65 in second. LSU Sophomore Matthew Sophia was third in 7.67, also a personal best.

The women’s 60m Open saw a Caribbean top three as Tina Clayton won ahead of twin sister Tia with Bahamian Anthonique Strachan finishing third. Tina’s winning time was a season’s best 7.25 while Tia’s time in second was 7.28 and Strachan’s in third was 7.30.

The men’s equivalent saw reigning Jamaican National 100m champion Rohan Watson run 6.76 to finish as runner up behind American Lawrence Johnson who ran 6.70. Another American, Tony Brown, ran a personal best 6.78 in third while Jamaica’s Michael Campbell ran 6.80 in fourth.

The College men’s 60m saw Bahamian Florida Sophomore Wanya McCoy produce a personal best 6.65 to finish second behind LSU Sophomore Myles Thomas (6.62). Thomas’s teammate, Godson Oghenebrume, also ran 6.65 in third.

The women’s College 400m saw Jamaican National champion Nickisha Pryce produce a personal best 51.04 to take the win. Her time also puts her #3 on the all-time Jamaican indoor list.

The Arkansas Junior finished ahead of her schoolmate Kaylyn Brown who ran a personal best 51.49 for second while Rosey Effiong completed the Arkansas 1-2-3 with 51.65 in third.

The women’s Open 400m saw Lanae-Tava Thomas and Stacey Ann Williams run 51.88 and 52.33 for second and third, respectively. American Alexis Holmes won in a meet record 50.80. Another Jamaican, Andrenette Knight, ran 52.68 in fourth.

In the field, 2019 World champion and national record holder, Tajay Gayle, opened his season with 8.15m to finish second in the men’s long jump. Gayle, who also took bronze at the World Championships in Budapest last year, also produced a 7.99m effort in his series on Friday.

The event was won by Florida Senior Malcolm Clemons with 8.17m while Bahamian Laquan Nairn produced 7.93m for third.

 

 

Bahamian sprinter Anthonique Strachan was the only Caribbean winner at the Astana Indoor Meet for Amin Tuyakov Prizes-a World Athletics Indoor Tour-Gold meet, in Kazakhstan on Saturday.

The 2012 double sprint World Junior champion ran 7.21 for victory in the women’s 60m. She finished just ahead of Poland’s Magdalena Stefanovicz (7.22) and Iran’s Farzaneh Fasihi (7.23). Jamaica's Tina Clayton ran 7.28 in sixth.

Reigning Jamaican National 100m champion Rohan Watson ran 6.65 for fifth in the male equivalent won by the USA’s Demek Kemp in 6.55. The Japanese pair of Shuhei Tada and Akihiro Higashida ran 6.58 and 6.59 for second and third, respectively.

The meet’s most impressive performance came in the women’s 60m hurdles where Nigeria’s Tobi Amusan, coached by Jamaican Lacena Golding-Clarke, produced an African record 7.77 to win ahead of two-time World Indoor champion Nia Ali (7.89) and Ireland’s Sarah Lavin (7.91). Jamaica’s Megan Tapper and Amoi Brown were fifth and eighth with times of 8.03 and 8.11, respectively.

The women’s 400m saw Jamaica’s Stephenie Ann McPherson finish second overall with a time of 54.66. The event was won by Portugal’s Catia Azevedo in 52.64 while Japan’s Nanako Matsumoto was third overall with 54.79.

Shericka Jackson will have to settle for a meet record instead of a world record after another dominating performance at the Diamond League finale in Eugene, Oregon on Sunday.

Fans were on world-record watch for the 200m world champion, who has run times of 21.41, 21.82 and 21.48, heading into Eugene but after winning the 100m Diamond League trophy in 10.70 on Saturday, Jackson seemingly didn’t have much left in her legs a day later but still sped to a meet record 21.57.

Florence Griffiths-Joyner world record of 21.34 set in 1988, survives for another year, but Jackson will undoubtedly challenge it again next season as the Olympic Games in Paris beckon.

Marie Josee Ta Lou ran a season-best 22.10 to finish second with Bahamian Anthonique Strachan finishing third in 22.16.

She may not have achieved the elusive World Record, but Jamaica’s Shericka Jackson had a Meet Record as consolation, as she demolished a field to win the women’s 200 metres at the Diamond League meet in Brussels on Friday.

Jackson running from lane six, was not as smooth as she would have liked in the early stages of the race but recovered well in the straight and sprinted away to stop the clock in 21.48s in a slight tailwind of 0.2 metres per second.

She bettered the previous Meet Record of 21.64s set by another Jamaican stalwart Merlene Ottey back in 1991 and will now turn her focus to Eugene which represents her final shot at the World Record of 21.34s held by American Florence Griffith-Joyner since 1988, this season.

Bahamian Anthonique Strachan closed fast to take second in 22.31s, with American Jenna Prandini (22.47s) taking third.

There was never any question about whether or not two-time World 200 metres Champion Shericka would win the event at Thursday’s Wanda Diamond League, and though she didn’t promise a record time, many eyes were on the clock as she approached the finish in Zurich, Switzerland.

In the end, the Jamaican, showing very little signs of fatigue, stopped the clock 21.82s in a slight 0.8 metres per second head wind.

Jackson stormed off the curve and later opened up in the stretch run, leaving Great Britain’s Daryll Neita (22.25s), to finish best of the rest, with American Kayla White (22.33s) in third.

Bahamian Anthonique Strachan, who early contested the 100m, placed sixth in 22.65s.

Meanwhile, American Noah Lyles, also extended his rich vein of form, as he closed fast to top the men’s event in 19.80s, ahead of compatriot Erriyon Knighton (19.87s), with Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes (19.94s) in third.

Jamaica’s Olympic champion Elaine Thompson-Herah signalled some semblance of improvement, as she clocked a season’s best 11.00 seconds for third behind newly minted World Champion Sha’Carri Richardson in the women’s 100m at the Wanda Diamond League in Zurich, Switzerland on Thursday.

Thompson-Herah, who has been struggling to get back to her best after battling injury, ran a well-paced raced from a tidy break, but couldn’t get back to Richardson, who continues to display her superb form this season.

The American won in 10.88s, with another Jamaican Natasha Morrison (11.00s), running her heart out from lane one, to edge Thompson-Herah for second.

Thompson-Herah’s time bettered her previous season’s best of 11.06s, and though it is well off her personal best of 10.54s, it signals a step in the right direction since she started working with Shanikie Osbourne on a provisional basis.

Meanwhile, Shashalee Forbes (11.2s), the other Jamaican in the event, placed fifth, while Anthonique Strachan (11.39s) of the Bahamas failed to figure on this occasion, placing ninth.

Shericka Jackson, Julien Alfred and Anthonique Strachan have made it through to the final of the Women’s 200m final at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary on Thursday.

The fastest of the three, Shericka Jackson, threw down the gauntlet to the 100m champion, the USA’s Shacarri Richardson, with a confident run to win her semi-final heat. Jackson ‘jogged’ to a time of 22.00 to leave the American 100m champion behind in 22.20. Marie Jose Ta Lou of the Ivory Coast who was third in 22.26 is also qualifier in a non-automatic spot.

However, the fastest overall heading into the final is the USA’s Gabby Thomas, who won the opening semi-final heat in 21.96. Great Britain’s Dina Asher-Smith also made it through to the final when she finished second in 22.28. However, it was the end of the campaign for Jamaica’s Natalliah Whyte who was third in 22.52.

Alfred of St Lucia had to briefly turn on the jets after Great Britain’s Daryll Neita who got out well in lane eight. However, the NCAA champion surged ahead down the home straight to win the heat in 22.17 with Neita close behind in 22.21. Strachan was third in 22.30 to take her place in the final.

Both Kayla White of the USA and Kevona Davis were fourth and fifth, respectively, in 22.34 and miss out on the final.

Six Caribbean ladies will line up in Thursday’s 200 metres semi-finals, following contrasting performances in their respective heats on day five of the World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary on Wednesday.

The six, a Jamaican trio of reigning champion Shericka Jackson, Kevona Davis and Natalliah Whyte will be joined by Bahamian Anthonique Strachan, St Lucian Julien Alfred and young British Virgin Islands sensation, Adaejah Hodge. Another Jamaican Ashanti Moore was the only Caribbean athlete to miss out.

Strachan, running from lane nine, got the show going in the first heat, where she was comfortable from start to finish, stopping the clock in 22.31s, ahead of Great Britain’s Daryll Neita (22.39s), with Jael Betsue (22.58s) of Spain taking the third automatic spot.

Moore, who was giving the opportunity to run the event following Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce’s withdrawal, found herself in a tough second heat. Though she went out hard, Moore had to settle for fifth in 23.12s, which was not good enough for one of the six non-automatic qualifying spots.

The heat was easily won by newly minted 100m champion American, Sha’Carri Richardson in 22.16s, ahead of Ivory Coast’s Marie-Josee Ta Lou, who clocked a season’s best 22.26s. Olivia Fotopoulou of Cyprus clocked a new personal best 22.65s for the third spot.

Jackson, the reigning 200m champion, expectedly made light work of rivals in heat three, as she cruised to 22.51s. Singapore’s Veronica Shanti Pereira, was second in a national record 22.57s, with Jessika Gbai (22.78s) of Ivory Coast in third.

Though Hodge was fourth, her time of 22.82s, was good enough to progress as one of the non-automatic qualifiers.

St Lucia’s Alfred was tops in heat four, as she powered her way to 22.31s, ahead of Jamaica’s Whyte 22.44s, with Great Britain’s Bianca Williams (22.67s) in third.

The fifth and penultimate heat saw another young Jamaican Davis (22.49s), also booking her semi-final spot with a second-place finish behind American Gabrielle Thomas, who clocked 22.26s.

Great Britain’s Dina Asher-Smith justified favouritism in the final heat which she won in 22.46s.

 

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American sprinter Gabby Thomas paid homage to her Jamaican roots on Thursday ahead of Friday’s Diamond League meeting in Monaco where she will take on a crack field over 200m that includes reigning world 200m champion Shericka Jackson.

It is well known that Thomas has Jamaican roots, something she is proud of and she enjoys the love and support of the island’s rabid track fans. On Thursday, she chose to set the record straight about how she feels about her Jamaican heritage.

Asked about her Jamaican connection, the Olympic bronze medallist responded, “So, my grandfather is actually Jamaican, he lives there, he is from there. My dad didn’t grow up there but he is Jamaican and he always likes to bring the culture home with me and made sure I was proud to be Jamaican.

“And I do really love the fan base in Jamaica, they have really been so amazing and supportive and I do make sure everyone knows that I am Jamaican because I do believe that is where I get my fast roots from. I am not going to sugar coat it because that’s what it is. And we grew up loving track and my family has always been a big track family so I if could just run, run well and make my grandmother and my dad proud, then I would have done my job.

Thomas, who holds the world-leading time of 21.60, will face a tough field that includes NCAA champion Julien Alfred of St Lucia as well as the talented Britons, Dina Asher-Smith and Daryll Neita and the dangerous Anthonique Strachan of the Bahamas, who has run a lifetime best of 22.15 so far this season

Shericka Jackson and Noah Lyles unleashed jaw-dropping runs at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday night during the revival of the Racers Grand Prix where world-record holder Wayde van Niekerk set a new stadium record in the 400m and Tyler Mason electrified the thousands who braved the heavy rain that threatened to dampen proceedings.

Earlier, on Saturday afternoon, Jackson, the World 200m champion, wrote in her notebook that she wanted to run between 10.75 and 10.78 in the 100m later that evening. She duly delivered speeding to a season-best 10.78 to win the race by some distance over the ever-improving Anthonique Strachan, who ran a season-best 10.99.

Sasha Lee Forbes, who ran a lifetime best of 10.98 in Bermuda on May 21, produced another solid performance while finishing third in 11.07, her second fastest time ever.

The withdrawal of Oblique Seville and Ackeem Blake from the men’s 100m final, took much of the sheen off what was expected to be a barn-burner that also featured American Christian Coleman. Nonetheless, the race delivered an exciting finish with the American holding off the challenge of Kadrian Goldson, who produced a lifetime best of 10.08 for second place.

Emmanuel Archibald of Guyana ran 10.23 to take the final podium spot.

The ‘B’ finals were also good value for money.

In September 2017, 20-year-old Michael Campbell suffered life-threatening injuries in a motor-vehicle accident that claimed the life of his friend and fellow athlete Jordon Scott. That same year, Campbell, a promising young prospect ran a lifetime best of 10.07 at a meet in Kingston.

On Saturday night, almost six years later, Campbell was back to his best winning the 100m in a season-best 10.08. He pumped his fist in elation when he looked across at the clock and noticed the winning time that had him well clear of Tyquendo Tracey, who ran 10.26 for second place and Kuron Griffith of Barbados, who ran a personal best of 10.30.

Remona Burchell, 2014 NCAA champion, clocked a season-best 11.17 to win the women’s race ahead of a fast-finishing Tia Clayton, who delivered a personal best of 11.23 and Briana Williams, who finished third in 11.30.

Lyles promised to do something special in Jamaica and he delivered. The super-confident American scorched the damp track to win in a meet record 19.67. Zharnel Hughes finished second in 20.14 while Rasheed Dwyer clocked a season’s best time of 20.53 for third.

The last time Wayde van Niekerk was in Jamaica, it was in 2017 to honour the retirement of his friend Usain Bolt, who had announced that he would walk away from her stellar career that year after a decade of dominance.

Later that same year, during a charity rugby match, the Olympic champion and world-record holder tore both the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscus cartilage in his right leg bringing his track career to a screaming stop.

The past few years saw him struggle to regain the form that made him one of the best quarter-milers in history. By all indications, he is now back near to his best. After a 44.17 season best at the South African Championships in April, the now 30-year-old sprinter cruised to victory in 44.21, a new meet record.

Zandrian Barnes finished second in a new lifetime best of 44.90, making him the third Jamaican to break 45 seconds this season. Jamaica’s national record holder, Rusheen McDonald was third in 45.24.

Antonio Watson was the second Jamaican to break 45 seconds this season when he won the ‘B’ final in a lifetime best of 44.75 that had the thousands in attendance cheering wildly.

Promising 400m hurdler Roshawn Clarke also ran a lifetime best of 45.24 for second place with Assinie Wilson finishing third also in a personal best of 45.51.

Charokee Young took control of the women’s race with about 120m to go and held off a strong field to win in 51.10 over Stacey-Ann Williams who ran a decent 51.34 for second place. The USA’s Kendall Ellis was third in a season-best 51.37.

Tobi Amusan arrived in Jamaica coming off a disappointing last-place finish in the 100m hurdles at the LA Grand Prix a week ago. The 12.69 she ran then was well off the Nigerian’s world record of 12.12 set in Eugene, Oregon last year. However, a week later she was much better, hurdling to victory in 12.57, a season’s best time and a marked improvement over a week ago.

Tia Jones, the 2018 World U20 champion, finished second in 12.72 while holding off Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper, who finished third in 12.80.

The 110m further confirmed the resurrection of the career of Tyler Mason, the once promising Jamaica College high school hurdler. After running 13.32 in Costa Rica in 2015, Mason, because of injury and poor form, struggled to fulfill his immense potential and many pundits saw his career as being on life support, especially after a season-best 14.12 in 2021.

There were signs of life in 2022 when he ran 13.34 in Tennessee and again earlier this year when he ran 13.32 at the National Stadium in April. On Saturday night, the 27-year-old Mason, told the world that news of his career’s demise were greatly exaggerated when he ran a slightly wind-aided 13.14 (2.3m/s) to win a close race over Orlando Bennett (13.18) and Damion Thomas 13.29.

Shian Salmon was impressive in victory to open proceedings in the 400m hurdles, winning in 55.10 over Rhonda Whyte 55.55 and Cassandra Tate of the USA, who took third in 55.62.

Two-time World Championships silver medallist Shanieka Ricketts won the triple jump over rival and friend Thea LaFond of Dominica in less than ideal conditions. The cool temperatures and negative headwind notwithstanding, Ricketts’ 14.32m to was enough to secure the victory ahead of LaFond’s 14.15m.

Imani Oliver of the USA could only muster 12.97m for third place.

Samoa’s Alex Rose won the men’s discus with a throw of 65.86m with Traves Smikle taking second place with 65.15m. Kai Change threw 63.19m for third place.

Lushane Wilson cleared 2.20m to win the high jump over Raymond Richards (2.15m) and Christoff Bryan (2.10m).

 

 

 

 

 As she readies herself for this weekend’s Racers Grand Prix in Kingston, Bahamian sprinter Anthonique Strachan has set her sights high for the current track season. Despite still undergoing rehabilitation from a quad injury she suffered at the world championships in Oregon last summer, Strachan recently showcased her determination and resilience by running a personal best of 22.15 at the Diamond League meeting in Rabat.

In an exclusive interview with Sportsmax.TV, Strachan shared her thoughts on her objectives for the season and how she has been managing her rehabilitation. "I would love to think that [the injury] is behind me, but I'm still rehabbing/pre-habbing the areas that were once a problem, especially my quad since it was a surprise to me," Strachan revealed while explaining that the timing of the injury was surprise that was unwelcome.

"I wasn't frustrated when it happened because I was shocked that it happened since I felt nothing leading up to it happening. It upset me that my body waited there and then to break," she said. However, she quickly shifted her focus towards getting back to running before the 2022 season ended to prepare her mind for the challenges of 2023.

Strachan acknowledged the physical and mental hurdles she faces as an athlete. "I wouldn't say that I overcame it because I experienced so much physical pain in this sport that I sometimes get into a mode of protection and fear. But I know that I can't sit in my own mental prison feeling alone and sorry for myself," she explained.

Rehabilitation and maintaining her overall well-being have become crucial aspects of Strachan's routine. She emphasized her commitment to daily treatment and rehab exercises while also making changes to her nutrition. "I try to learn my body daily to know where it's at. Also trying desperately to correct my technique and daily posture," Strachan shared, adding with a hint of humor, "Even though I'm still terrible at that part since ice cream and sour candy is my weakness."

Reflecting on her recent performance in Rabat, where she clocked an impressive lifetime best while finishing second to World Champion Shericka Jackson, Strachan expressed satisfaction but refrained from setting specific time goals for future races.

"I'm not really telling myself what time to run because I don't want to be chasing a time. I'm just trying to do everything I do in training in an actual race, with the hope of a better outcome," she explained, saying that she is determined to surpass her previous achievements and push herself further: "Even though I'm not chasing times, I am constantly trying to beat the old me. Rabat has gone, and that was 22.1, so my next 200, whenever that is, I'm looking to beat up on Rabat Anthonique. Hopefully, it's easier."

As the track season progresses, Strachan remains tight-lipped about her exact plans and performance expectations. "We'll have to see. I'm enjoying watching people assume and guess," she stated. However, she did disclose her general objectives, which include executing a good race, having fun, and building momentum moving forward.

For Saturday’s Racers Grand Prix, Strachan has one clear objective. “To execute a good race, have fun and build momentum forward!”

 

 

 

 

Rasheed Broadbell, Shericka Jackson and Steven Gardiner won their respective events in impressive fashion at the Diamond League meeting in Rabat, Morocco on Sunday.

In the 110m hurdles delayed by two faulty starts and run into a headwind of 1.3 m/s, Broadbell, the Commonwealth Games champion, used his trademark late surge to defeat World Champion Grant Holloway and set a new meet record of 13.08.

“I am happy about how I performed today. I am pleased to get this win. I managed to get this victory by being focused during the race. My goal this year is to execute well,” said Broadbell, who broke the previous meet record of 13.12 set by David Oliver in 2016.

“I would like to thank the crowd here for being supportive and fantastic. I am getting ready for the world championship by staying healthy and in good shape.”

Holloway equaled the previous record 13.12 while finishing second. Olympic champion Hansle Parchment was third in 13.24 edging Devon Allen who was fourth in 13.25.

Jackson, the reigning 200m world champion and the second-fastest woman of all time over the distance, recovered from a sluggish start to set a new meet record of 21.98. Finishing second was Bahamian Anthonique Strachan, who ran a lifetime best of 22.15. American Tamari Davis also ran a lifetime best of 22.30 for third.

Stephen Gardiner ran an easy 44.70 to win the 400m ahead of Vernon Norwood, who ran 45.11 for second place. Rusheen McDonald surged late to finish third in 45.55.

In the opening race, the Women’s 400m hurdles Shamier Little ran a season 53.95 with three Jamaicans in her wake. Rushell Clayton, who led heading into the seventh hurdle, was not far behind in 54.15 while Shian Salmon, who seemed to stumble over the 10th and final hurdle, recovered to finish strong in 54.42m for third.

Janieve Russell finished fourth in 55.41.

Cuba’s Leyanis Perez Fernandez established a world-leading 14.84m to win the triple jump. Maryna Bekh-Romanchuk took second place with her best jump of 14.65m with two-time world championship silver medallist Shanieka Ricketts finishing third with her season-best effort of 14.53m.

 

 

 

 

Olympic 400m champion Steven Gardiner laid down the gauntlet for the world’s quarter-milers on Sunday when he won his season opener in impressive fashion at the USATF Bermuda Grand Prix.

The Bahamian, who was unable to defend his world title in Oregon last year because of foot injury, showed that he was back to his best, winning in in 44.42, the third fastest time in the world this year. No other competitor was close as compatriot Alonzo Russell was almost a second behind in 45.24.

Jamaica’s Javon Francis ran a season-best 45.81 for fourth with compatriot Demish Gaye fifth in 45.92.

Puerto Rico’s Gabby Scott won the 400m in 51.65 with the USA’s Courtney Okolo making a late move to snatch second in 52.23 ahead of Jamaica’s Candace McLeod who was third in 52.30.

The 100m races delivered in the expected excitement.

Christian Coleman took advantage of a bullet start to win the 100m final in a windy 9.78 (3.8 m/s). Noah Lyles surged late to get by Ackeem Blake to finish second in 9.80 with the Jamaican Blake taking third in 9.87.

Kadrian Goldson won the Men’s B final in a wind-aided 9.96 (3.8m/s) ahead of compatriot Michael Campbell 10.11 with the USA’s Chris Royster third in 10.21.

The Women’s 100m was also a thrilling affair won by the USA’s Tamari Davis in 10.91 with Jamaica’s Sashalee Forbes running a lifetime best of 10.98 for second place. Celera Barnes of the USA ran a season-best of 11.01 for third place.

Kemba Nelson was fifth in a season-best 11.14.

Shannon Ray won the Women’s ‘B’ final in 11.04 (2.7m/s) over Ashley Henderson (11.12) and Jamaica’s Remona Burchell (11.15). Jonielle Smith (11.18).

Earlier, Andrenette Knight set the tone for Caribbean athletes when she won the 400m hurdles in 54.90s in what was a Jamaican 1-3-4.

Knight, 26, who’s time was a season best, took the lead from the USAs Anna Cockrell at the sixth hurdle and never relinquished it holding off a late challenge from Cassandra Tate of the USA who finished in 55.06.

Shian Salmon ran a season-best 55.56 for third place with Rhonda Whyte fourth in the same time. Salmon got third by virtue of stopping the clock at 55.551 to Whyte’s 55.556.

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn won the 100m hurdles in 12.17 aided by a 3.5m/s wind. Finishing second was Jamaica’s Danielle Williams, who clocked 12.38 while the USA’s Tonea Marshall third in 12.39. Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper was fourth in 12.47.

Jamal Britt of the USA won the 110m hurdles in 12.99 (4.0 m/s). Eric Edwards finished second in 13.07 with Freddie Crittenden third in 13.13 in a USA 1-2-3. Tyler Mason (13.30) and Damion Thomas (13.38) were fourth and fifth, respectively.

First-year pro, Abby Steiner outclassed the field to win the 200m in 22.06 holding off Bahamian Anthonique Strachan (22.34) was second while Mackenzie Dunmore was third in 22.50. Jamaica’s Ashanti Moore was fourth in 22.78.

 In a dramatic conclusion to the Women’s long jump, Tara Davis-Woodhall leaped out to a wind-aided 7.11m to win over rival Quanesha Burks, whose 7.04m had in her the lead until Davis-Woodhall’s final jump.

Ruth Osoro of Nigeria jumped a personal best 6.82m for third place.

Will Claye won the triple jump with 17.45m over compatriot Donald Scott, who’s effort of 17.06m was the same as Jamaica’s Jordan Scott but was better on the countback.

A Jamaican women’s team of Remona Burchell, Ashanti Moore, Sashalee Forbes and Jonielle Smith won the 4x100m relay in 42.80 in a blanket finish with USA Red (42.83) and USA Blue (42.87).

The USA’s Men’s team of Christian Coleman, Kendall Williams, Josephus Lyles and Terrance Laird won the men’s sprint relay in 38.21 over USA Blue (38.81) and Jamaica – Damion Thomas, Kadrian Goldson, Jevaughn Whyte and Michael Campbell – was third in 39.51.

 

 

 

 

World champion athletes Steven Gardiner and Shericka Jackson are among Caribbean headliners set to compete at the Miramar Invitational at the Ansin Sports Complex on Saturday.

Gardiner, who is making a return after missing the 2022 World Championships in Oregon with an inflamed tendon, will run the 200m against a line-up that includes Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes and Botswana’s World U20 100m champion Letsile Tebogo.

The USA’s Kenny Bednarek will also compete in the half-lap sprint that is expected to be electric.

Meanwhile, Jackson, the reigning world 200m women’s champion, will take on a crack field in what will be her third 400m run for the season. She will line up against fellow Jamaicans, the Olympic finalist Stephenie-Ann McPherson, Janieve Russell and Charokee Young as well as American 400m hurdler Shamier Little and Aliya Adams.

World championships finalist Oblique Seville is among 22 sprinters listed for the 100m. The Jamaican prospect will take on compatriots Ackeem Blake, Andrew Hudson, Raheem Chambers, Oshane Bailey, and Michael Campbell for a lane in the finals.

Cejhae Green of Antigua and Barbuda, Ian Kerr of the Bahamas and Eric Harrison Jr of Trinidad and Tobago will also be aiming to make it into the finals. American veteran Mike Rodgers and current star Ronnie Baker will also be in contention.

Among the women, Briana Williams returns to her former training ground, hoping to make up for her poor performance over 200m at the recent Velocity Fest meet at the national stadium in Kingston. However, she will have her work cut out for her as she runs her first 100m this season.

A crack field has been assembled that includes the mercurial American Sha’Carri Richardson, compatriots Twanisha Terry, Teahna Daniels, Cambrea Sturgis, Melissa Jefferson and Javianne Oliver as well as Jamaicans Natasha Morrison, Jonielle Smith, Shockoria Wallace and Kashieka Cameron.

The 200m dash for women also promises to be intriguing with the likes of Caribbean stars World Championship 400m bronze medallist Sada Williams lining up against Anthonique Strachan of the Bahamas and Jamaica’s Natalliah Whyte.

The race will also include the supremely talented Abby Steiner, Tamari Davis and Kyra Jefferson.

Machel Cedenio lines up in the 400m against Jamaica’s Rusheen McDonald and Alonzo Russell of the Bahamas. They will represent Caribbean pride as they do battle with the USA’s Michael Cherry and Great Britain’s Matthew Hudson-Smith.

Shafiqua Maloney of St Vincent and the Grenadines will take up the USA’s Ajee Wilson over 800m while Rajay Hamilton goes in the men’s equivalent against Puerto Rico’s Ryan Sanchez.

BVI’s Kyron McMaster will take on Marvin Williams of Jamaica and Andre Colebrook of the Bahamas over the 400m hurdles while Orlando Bennett, Damion Thomas of Jamaica and Shane Brathwaite of Barbados will challenge the might of American Daniel Roberts in the 110m hurdles.

Amoi Brown of Jamaica faces a tough field of Tonea Marshall, Anna Cockrell and Gabby Cunningham in the 100m hurdles that also features Haitian talent Mulern Jean.

In the field events, the long jump for both men and women should provide solid entertainment as 2019 World Champion Tajay Gayle, who has been gradually making a return from a long-term knee injury has been included in a field that also has LaQuan Nairn of the Bahamas and Andwuelle Wright of Trinidad and Tobago.

They will have their hands full facing Japan’s Shoutarou Shiroyama.

The women’s event promises to be an evenly matched affair as Jamaica’s Chanice Porter and Barbados’ Akela Jones will match skills against the USA’s Tiffany Flynn and Taliyah Brooks.

Danniel Thomas-Dodd and Lloydricia Cameron will be aiming for podium spots in the shot put as they take on the likes of Adelaide Aquilla and Khayla Dawson of the USA.

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

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