Meet record 10.83 for Thompson-Herah as Paulino, LaFond also secure wins in Rabat

By June 05, 2022

Elaine Thompson-Herah was a happy camper after cruising to victory in the 100m at the Diamond League meeting in Rabat, Morocco on Sunday. The Tokyo Olympics 100m champion clocked an easy-looking 10.83 that was a new meet record, eclipsing her own meet record of 10.87 set back in 2017.

“I feel amazing about the race today. This is my third time in Rabat and I'm super excited about the new meeting record of 10.83,” said the fastest woman alive while promising more of the same when she competes in Rome on Thursday, June 9.

“For the next event in Rome, I'm following the same process and keeping up the same pace.”

Meanwhile, Marie Jose Ta Lou of the Ivory Coast produced a late surge to overtake Jamaica’s Natasha Morrison, crossing the finish line in a season-best 11.04. Morrison also ran a season best 11.22 for the final podium spot.

The Women’s 400m was an all-Caribbean affair that was won by the Dominican Republic’s Marileidy Paulino, who timed her finish to perfection storming past Jamaica’s McPherson and Barbados’ Sada Williams at the top of the final straight to win 50.10.

“I am happy to get this win here in Rabat. It is an important achievement for me and for my country, especially in the eyes of the world,” the Tokyo Olympics silver medallist said afterwards.

“The race was quick, but I managed to cross the line first. I trained well and this helped me to do my best. For me, my participation in Rabat is good preparation for the world championship.”

McPherson, who went out hard, had little left down the home straight and was overtaken by Williams, who clocked a season best 50.74 for second place while McPherson also ran a season-best time, 51.37, despite fading badly over the final 50m of the race.

Dominica’s Thea LaFond produced a late winning jump of 14.46m to win the triple jump competition ahead of Jamaica’s Shanieka Ricketts, who had a season-best 14.43 and Slovenia’s Neja Filipic, who produced a lifetime best of 14.42m for third.

 

 

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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