Danielle Williams made it two wins from two starts on Sunday since her medal exploits in Budapest after hurdling to a comfortable victory at the ISATF Meeting in Berlin.

The 30-year-old two-time world champion cruised to victory in the 100m hurdles in an easy 12.71. She was well clear of Australia’s Michelle Jenneke, who clocked 12.89 for the runner-up spot. In third was the USA’s Amber Hughes, who crossed the line in 12.98.

The news was not so good for the other Jamaican in the race. Olympic silver medallist Megan Tapper did not complete the event.

However, Williams was not the only Caribbean winner in Berlin on Sunday. Olympic bronze medallist Ronald Levy, who has been making his way back to form after long-term injuries, won the 110m hurdles in 13.45, a season’s best.

Levy got the nod over Just Kwaou-Matthey of France, who was timed in 13.46 in a blanket finish. Italy’s Ndele Simonelli Lorenzo was not far behind in 13.50.

Bahamian star runner Shaune Miller Uibo did not finish her 400m race that was won by Norway’s Henriette Jaeger in a new national record of 51.03.

Meanwhile, Jamaica’s Jonielle Smith was third in the 100m. She ran a time of 11.33 in the race won by the USA’s Jenna Prandini in 11.24 with Belgium’s Rani Rosius finishing just ahead of the Jamaican in 11.32.

As the curtains fell on the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, the global track and field community bore witness to an unforgettable spectacle of talent, resilience, and passion. For nine consecutive days, athletes from around the world competed under sweltering heat in their pursuit of excellence.

Among these remarkable competitors, it was the athletes from the Caribbean who stood out, earning well-deserved praise from Keith Joseph, President of the Caribbean Association of National Olympic Committees (CANOC).

In a message released on Friday morning, Joseph expressed his admiration for the outstanding performances of Caribbean athletes, acknowledging their dedication to representing their countries and the region on the world stage.

"The excitement of the athletics competition, once started, never abated," Joseph remarked. "The final event, the women's 4 x 400m relay, saw Jamaica's potential hold on the gold medal slip away, literally in the final strides, much to our collective CANOC chagrin. But this did not detract from the fact that on yet another occasion in the wide and wonderfully exciting world of track and field competition, Jamaica continued to carry the Caribbean cause on its back."

Joseph went on to highlight several standout performances that left an indelible mark on the championships. Shericka Jackson's remarkable victory in the 200m solidified her status as a global star in the sport. Antonio Watson's stunning triumph in the 400m, despite his status as an U23 athlete, showcased the immense potential of the region's younger talents. Danielle Williams added another gold medal to Jamaica's tally with her impressive win in the 100m hurdles.

Joseph also highlighted Hansle Parchment and Wayne Pinnock secured silver medals in the 110m hurdles and long jump, respectively. The women's 4 x 100m and 4 x 400m relay teams also earned silver for Jamaica, while Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce and Rushell Clayton contributed bronze medals to the nation's haul in the 100m and 400m hurdles events.

The president’s praise also extended beyond Jamaica in acknowledging, the Dominican Republic's Marileidy Paulino domination of the women's 400m, while the British Virgin Islands' Kyron McMaster made a triumphant return to form with a silver medal in the 400m hurdles. Barbados' Sada Williams displayed her prowess with a silver in the women's 400m, and Leyanis Hernandez of Cuba secured a bronze in the triple jump.

Cuba continued to make its presence felt in the championships, with Lazaro Martinez and Cristian Urria taking second and third place, respectively, in the men's triple jump. Grenada's Lindon Victor made his mark by earning a bronze in the men's javelin.

Amidst the celebrations, St. Lucia's Julien Alfred emerged as a rising star, placing fifth in the 100m and fourth in the 200m. Dominica's Thea LaFond held her own, finishing fifth in the women's triple jump.

Joseph acknowledged that there were disappointments along the way for some Caribbean athletes, but their spirits remained unbroken. He celebrated the resilience that defines the Caribbean people, inspiring their athletes to give their best, fully aware that they are motivated to go 'beyond possible,' defying every attempt to deter their commitment to success.

 

"The World Athletics Championships are done," Joseph declared. "The performances of our athletes are now indelibly recorded in global athletics history. As CANOC, we stand proud of our athletes, medallists as well as those who missed out. Together, we affirm our commitment to our Caribbean-ness."

With these inspiring performances, Caribbean athletes have once again proven their mettle on the global stage, leaving an enduring legacy of dedication, perseverance, and pride in their Caribbean heritage. Their remarkable achievements continue to inspire and unite the region, setting the stage for even greater success in the future.

 

 

 

 

If anyone thought that Danielle Williams’ ‘surprise’ victory last week at the World Championships in Budapest was a fluke, she put all that to rest on Thursday when she stormed the victory against a quality field in the 100m hurdles at the Diamond League meeting in Zurich on Thursday.

Williams, the now two-time world champion, ran a clean race to win in 12.54s with a fast-finishing Alaysha Johnson and former world record holder Kendra Harrison, who ran 12.58 and 12.59, respectively for second and third.

Williams was ecstatic in victory. “It is a wonderful feeling coming out here as a World Champion. I mean, I have to give all the thanks for that. The race was a bit slower than I expected, but you know, I came out injury free, and with a win, so I can't complain,” she said.

“I haven't had much time to celebrate my big win in Budapest, it will probably the day after I finish my season. I am now onto my next meet, and I will try to celebrate after Eugene.”

Newly minted two-time world 100m hurdles champion Danielle Wiliams believes she is capable of challenging the world record in her event.

Williams, the 2015 world champion and the 2019 bronze medalist, shocked a stacked field at the World Athletics Championships in Budapest last week, winning her second title in 12.43s, her fastest time this year. In claiming victory, she defeated Olympic champion Jasmine Camacho-Quinn of Puerto Rico, former world record holder Kendra Harrison, who won silver and bronze, respectively.

Williams also defeated Nigeria’s Tobi Amusan, who set the world record of 12.12 at the World Championships in Eugene, Oregon in 2022.

At Wednesday’s press conference ahead of Thursday’s Diamond League meeting in Zurich, Switzerland, Williams was asked whether she believes she can challenge Amusan’s world record, which raised eyebrows when she stormed to victory in her semi-final heat last year.

“From the moment I started getting competitive in the hurdles, many people told me that I have the potential to break the world record. I didn't necessarily believe it at the time. I just thought, you know, you guys are just talking,” said Williams, who has run a lifetime best of 12.32, the second fastest time ever run by a Jamaican woman.

“But the more I go, the more I believe that it is in range.”

Williams, who was third at Jamaica’s national championships in July, revealed she has actually had dreams of setting the world record.

“Funny story, 12.12, the time that Tobi ran to break the record last year, I actually had a dream a few years ago that the world record was going to be 12.12 seconds. I thought it was that was going to be me who's going to break it, but it wasn't,” she said.

“And so I still believe that it is within range. You know, we're all out here, the essence of track and field is running as fast as you can, and so I believe that I can run 12.1 seconds. It's just a lot of things that need to be tweaked to get there, but I think I could get there.”

In Zurich on Thursday, Williams will once again face Camacho-Quinn and Harrison in Zurich in another stacked field that also includes 2019 world champion Nia Ali, Devynne Charlton of the Bahamas, Tia Jones and Alasyha Johnson.

 

Just like she did in Beijing in 2015, Danielle Williams stunned the field to claim World Championship gold in the women’s 100m hurdles final at the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Thursday.

The 30-year-old got a bullet start and held her nerve to come across the line in a season’s best 12.43 ahead of pre-race favorite and reigning Olympic Champion, Jasmine Camacho-Quinn of Puerto Rico, who was just behind in second with 12.44. Camacho-Quinn entered the final unbeaten in 12 races this season.

American former World Record holder, Keni Harrison, was third in 12.46 while Bahamian World Indoor Champion, Devynne Charlton, was fourth in 12.52. NCAA Indoor and Outdoor Champion, Ackera Nugent, ran 12.61 for fifth while World Record holder and defending World Champion, Tobi Amusan, ran 12.62 in sixth.

Jamaica’s Ackera Nugent and Danielle Williams, as well as Bahamian Devynne Charlton secured their spot in the women’s 100 metres hurdles final, after safely navigating their respective semi-finals on Wednesday’s fifth day of the World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

While it was unbridled joy for those three, it was heartbreak for another Jamaican Megan Tapper, as the Olympic medallist placed fourth and her time was not good enough to see her through to tomorrow’s final scheduled for 2:25pm Jamaica time.

Charlton and Tapper both ran from semi-final one, where they placed second and fourth respectively. Charlton, 27, secured the second automatic qualifying spot in 12.49s, behind American Kendra Harrison, who won in 12.33s.

Despite running her heart out, Tapper (12.55s) was out dipped by Switzerland’s Ditaji Kambundji (12.50s), who progressed to tomorrow’s final as one of the two fastest qualifiers on time ahead of the Jamaican.

The second semi-final was just an exciting with Ackera Nugent leading for most of the way but was pipped on the line by Nigeria’s World Record holder Tobi Amusan. Nugent stopped the clock in 12.60s, behind Amusan’s 12.56s.

The last of the three semi-finals saw Jamaica’s former World Champion Danielle Williams off to a blistering start, but she lost her composure close to the end and had to settle for third in a season’s best 12.50s. Fortunately, for her the time was good enough to progress to the final.

Puerto Rico’s Jasmine Camacho-Quinn produced a late burst to win in 21.41s, with American Nia Ali (12.49s), just bettering Williams on the line.

 

You can catch live action of the 2023 World Athletic Championships by downloading the Sportsmax App.

Ackera Nugent, Devynne Charlton, Danielle Williams and Megan Tapper all progressed to the semi-finals of the 100m hurdles on day four of the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Tuesday.

Nugent, the NCAA Indoor and Outdoor Champion, was first up in heat one, producing 12.60 to narrowly win ahead of American Masai Russell who was credited with the same time. Ireland’s Sarah Lavin (12.69) and France’s Cyrena Samba-Mayela (12.71) completed the top four.

2019 World Champion, Nia Ali, ran 12.55 to win the second heat ahead of Poland’s Pia Skrzyszowska (12.65), South Africa’s Marione Fourie (12.71) and Hungary’s Luca Kozak (12.71).

2015 World Champion Danielle Williams and 2022 World Indoor Champion Devynne Charlton both lined up in heat three. Charlton and Williams were second and third with 12.44, a new Bahamian national record, and 12.51, respectively, as the race was won by American former world record holder in a blistering 12.24. Great Britain’s Cindy Sember was fourth in 12.83.

Puerto Rico’s Olympic Champion, Jasmine Camacho-Quinn, was next up in heat four. She continued her unbeaten run this season with 12.50 to comfortably win the heat ahead of the Netherlands’ Nadine Visser (12.68) and Switzerland’s Ditaji Kambundji (12.71). Celeste Mucci of Australia also made it through with 12.90 in fourth.

Jamaican national champion, Megan Tapper, finished second in the fifth and final heat in 12.51 to advance. Nigerian World Champion and world record holder Tobi Amusan ran 12.49 to win the heat while Australia’s Michelle Jenneke and Cyprus’ Natalia Christofi ran 12.71 and 12.90 in third and fourth, respectively.

Sha’Carri Richardson went 2-0 against Shericka Jackson this season after storming to victory in the 100m at the Silesia Diamond League meeting in Poland on Sunday. The American, who remains unbeaten over 100m this season chased down Jackson, nipping the Jamaican at the line to win in a time of 10.76.

Jackson, celebrating her 29th birthday on Sunday and who ran a world-leading 10.65 to win the Jamaican championships a week ago, clocked in at 10.78. Poland’s Ewa Swoboda ran a personal best of 10.94 for third place.

“It was an amazing race, I am really having fun,” an excited Richardson said afterwards.

“The 10.76 - I love the time. I put a great race together. This was a great competition, it was amazing. I executed correctly. I love the atmosphere here. I wish we could replicate this to the US. All the energy, all the love from the audience. I was satisfied with my race altogether.”

It wasn’t a particularly good day for Caribbean athletes nonetheless the eighth Diamond League meeting of the season delivered plenty of outstanding performances considering that the World Championships are less than five weeks away.

Chief among those performances was the meet record 44.08s South Africa’s Wayde Van Niekerk unleased on a quality field in the 400m. Demonstrating his best form since his return from a career-threatening knee injury in 2017, the South African has Brazil’s Alison dos Santos, himself returning from recent knee surgery, for company up to 300m before the 31-year-old Olympic champion went full throttle down the home stretch putting daylight between himself and the rest of the field.

Bayapo Ndori of Botswana finished strong to slip by the Brazilian and crossed the finish line in a personal best 44.61. Dos Santos, the 2022 World 400m hurdles champion settled for third in a season-best 44.73.

Van Niekerk expressed his satisfaction with the race.

“Things are moving in a positive direction. I have been able to train consistently. It is my fastest run in seven years and 44.0 shows that 43 seconds is possible,” he said.

“The competition in my event is getting stronger, so I need to work to get better as well. I do not feel any special pressure, but it is natural for an athlete to want to reach their best possible level. I will be going on to London now and then want to get some good training sessions before the World Championships.”

Earlier, Poland’s Natalia Kaczmarek delivered a similarly devastating performance in the women’s race that she won in a new lifetime best of 49.48 which was also a new meet record.  Lieke Klaver of the Netherlands also showed she was in good form heading into the world championships clocking in a time of 49.81, which was just shy of Femke Bol’s previous meet record of 49.75.

Marileidy Paulino, the World Championship silver medalist, uncharacteristically outrun over the first 300 metres, stormed through the field late to finish third in 50.00.

Jamaica’s Candice McLeod ran a season’s best 50.19 for fourth just ahead of Barbados’ Commonwealth Games champion, Sada Williams fifth, also in a season’s best 50.34.

 The 100m hurdles was another thrilling affair that saw World Champion Tobi Amusan winning in a season-best and new meet record 12.34 to edge Kendra Harrison, the former world record holder, who finished second in 12.35.

Newly crowned USA champion Nia Ali ran a time of 12.38 for third place.

Breaking down her performance afterwards, Amusan revealed the challenges she has faced while competing this season.

“It was not easy for me with injuries in my hamstring and my knee. But I trusted in my coach and my work,” said the Nigerian who is coached by Jamaican Olympian Lacena Golding-Clarke.

“It is all about the process. I just won this in a smooth style, I was just running. Honestly, I had no idea that I won when I crossed the finish line.”

In reference to the upcoming world championships, Amusan said she was not looking too far ahead.

“I take it one step after the next. I knew it was going to be a battle until the finish line. I am happy to compete against the best. I am just out here doing well. I came out there I was not feeling too good. About my start - I would not say that I executed, but the second part of the race was really good. I am most definitely building up for the World Championships, extremely satisfied with my season-best, one step at a time.

Jamaican champion Megan Tapper was the best placed Caribbean athlete. She finished fourth in 12.49, her second fastest time ever, after the 12.44 she ran at Jamaica’s National Championships a week ago.  Danielle Williams, the 2015 world champion was fifth in a season-best 12.55.

Natoya Goule has been running well all season and she produced another season-best performance to finish third in the 800m. The Jamaican champion ran 1:57.90 but was not fast enough to get by Uganda’s Hallimah Nakaayi who set a new national record of 1:57.78.

However, both women were outrun by Kenya’s Mary Moraa, who sped a new meet record and season-best time of 1:56.85, which sets her up as a legitimate medal contender in the event at Budapest next month.

American Fred Kerley lost his first 100m this season, finishing second to Akani Simbini in a closely contested race in which 0.02 separated the top four finishers. The South African ran 9.97 to Kerley’s 9.98, which was the same time given to Cameroon’s Emmanuel Eseme.

The USA’s 100m champion Cravont Charleston finished fourth in 9.99.

Yohan Blake, the 2017 World Champion, was fourth in 10.01, his best time this season.

Yulimar Rojas was once again dominant the women’s triple setting a world-leading mark of 15.18m, which was also new meet record and season’s best.

Ukraine’s Maryna Bekh-Romanchuk came late to the party with a leap of 14.70m which gave her second place while bumping Cuba’s Leyanis Perez-Hernandez, second for most of the competition, down to third.

Jamaican champion Shanieka Ricketts’ season-best jump of 14.56m saw her finish fifth while Dominica’s Thea LaFond was sixth with 14.43m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

As Jamaica's national championships approach, all eyes are on Ackera Nugent, the reigning NCAA 100m hurdles champion, who is expected to shine in the absence of the injured Britany Anderson, the 2022 World Championships silver medalist.

However, the University of Arkansas junior remains unfazed by the pressure of expectations, emphasizing that she focuses solely on her own goals and well-being as an athlete. Nugent will be going up against Danielle Williams, the 2015 World Champion, Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper, and World U20 Champion Kerrica Hill among others battling for a place on Jamaica's team to the championships in Budapest next month. She remains unfazed by the unofficial 'favourite' tag that she now bears. 

"For me, I don't live up to the expectations of what people have for me," Nugent expressed during a recent Zoom call. "At the end of the day, they (the fans) don't know what I am going through as an athlete, the whole background plan that me and my coach have, and expectations from each other. I can only live up to my own expectations and, as I always say, to finish healthy."

Nugent's mindset revolves around her readiness and confidence. With one of the best coaches in Chris Johnson, guiding her, she prioritizes following his instructions and ensuring she completes each hurdle event without injury.

"The most important thing for me is that I know that I'm ready,” she declared.

“I have one of the best coaches there is, and the most important thing for me is to follow the instruction that he gives me and also finish the hurdles healthy.

"I'm not afraid to compete. I don't care what you have accomplished, what you have done. I know how good I am, and I have to remain confident in myself and just go out there to compete to the best of my ability."

Nugent's victory in the NCAA Championships in Austin, Texas, where she ran a wind-aided 12.25, the fastest time ever run under all conditions on the American collegiate circuit, provided her with a significant confidence boost.

It came after a second-place finish at the SEC Championships, fueling her determination to prove herself in a highly competitive field.

In the women's sprint hurdles final, Nugent faced formidable opponents Alia Armstrong of Louisiana State, who beat her at SECs and Masai Russell of the University of Kentucky.

 However, Nugent's unwavering focus and belief in her abilities propelled her to victory.

"What I would have known since I've been hurdling, it just takes, no matter what lane you are in, no matter who you are up against, it just takes the person who's more focused on their lane," Nugent revealed.

"Going down that track, I was like, 'They will not beat me today. I'm the best in the field, and I'm going to prove that I am the best in the field.'"

Embracing the underdog role further fueled Nugent's motivation.

"I feel for me, going into the event as the least favorite to win was a little motivation... because I was like, 'I have accomplished so much.' I was like, 'I am better than these ladies.' And because I know, and because coach always tells me that it's good to have somebody behind you, and I'm like, 'I have people that are counting on me,' and it was just me against these hurdles."

Throughout the race, Nugent remained focused on her lane and executed her coach's instructions flawlessly. Her disciplined approach paid off, leading to a memorable victory.

As she prepares for Jamaica's national championships, Nugent's confidence remains unwavering, driven by her dedication, talent, and the support of her coach.

Danielle Williams, the 2015 World 100m hurdles champion, pulled off a confidence-boosting victory at the American Track League Atlanta Meet in Atlanta on Saturday, where several Jamaica athletes continued to fine tune their preparations for their national championships next month.

400m hurdler Rhonda Whyte, quarter-miler D’Andre Anderson and 800m runner Rajay Hamilton were also among the winners.

Williams, the 2019 World Championship bronze medallist, ran a season best 12.62 into a headwind of -1.5m/s in what was a comfortable victory over Kaylor Harris, who ran a personal best 12.92 for second place. Mulern Jean claimed the other podium spot after running 13.04 for third place.

Whyte also clocked a season-best time of 55.11 while winning the 400m hurdles over Lauren Hoffman who finished in second place in 55.77, a season-best. Lashana Graham who will be representing Jamaica at the CAC Games finished third in 56.67.

Anderson produced a lifetime best of 45.87 to win the 400m at a canter over Brian Faust (46.18) and Evan Mafila, who ran a lifetime best of 46.22 for third place.

Several other Jamaicans won podium spots at the meet.

Among them were Lafranz Campbell and Damion Thomas who were second and third, respectively in the 110m hurdles that was won by Dylan Beard in 13.32. Campbell and Thomas ended up in a blanket finish with Campbell clocking a season-best 13.51 for second with Campbell awarded third in 13.52.

The in-form Tamari Davis won the 100m in 11.08, just ahead of Natalliah Whyte, who seems to be rounding nicely into form with an 11.12 clocking for second place. Maia McCoy was third in 11.16. Whyte picked up another second-place finish in the 200m in 22.94 behind winner Jessika Gbai, who ran 22.78 for the win.

Shakima Wimbley ran a season-best 23.16 for third place.

It was a 1-2 finish for the Jamaicans in the 800m that saw Hamilton finish in 1:47.06 to Tarees Rhoden’s 1:47.20. Jake Ulrich finished third in 1:48.24.

The Women’s 400m was run over four sections and Jamaica’s Natoya Goule ran a nippy 51.76 to win her section but was fourth overall behind Quanera Hayes 51.74, Courntney Okolo 51.72 and winner Makenzie Dunmore 51.46.

Chanice Porter produced a leap of 6.52m for a second place finish in the long jump. Tiffany Flynn soared out to 6.70m for the win while Melissa Munoz finished third with her effort of 6.43m.

 

 

 

 

Olympic 400m champion Steven Gardiner laid down the gauntlet for the world’s quarter-milers on Sunday when he won his season opener in impressive fashion at the USATF Bermuda Grand Prix.

The Bahamian, who was unable to defend his world title in Oregon last year because of foot injury, showed that he was back to his best, winning in in 44.42, the third fastest time in the world this year. No other competitor was close as compatriot Alonzo Russell was almost a second behind in 45.24.

Jamaica’s Javon Francis ran a season-best 45.81 for fourth with compatriot Demish Gaye fifth in 45.92.

Puerto Rico’s Gabby Scott won the 400m in 51.65 with the USA’s Courtney Okolo making a late move to snatch second in 52.23 ahead of Jamaica’s Candace McLeod who was third in 52.30.

The 100m races delivered in the expected excitement.

Christian Coleman took advantage of a bullet start to win the 100m final in a windy 9.78 (3.8 m/s). Noah Lyles surged late to get by Ackeem Blake to finish second in 9.80 with the Jamaican Blake taking third in 9.87.

Kadrian Goldson won the Men’s B final in a wind-aided 9.96 (3.8m/s) ahead of compatriot Michael Campbell 10.11 with the USA’s Chris Royster third in 10.21.

The Women’s 100m was also a thrilling affair won by the USA’s Tamari Davis in 10.91 with Jamaica’s Sashalee Forbes running a lifetime best of 10.98 for second place. Celera Barnes of the USA ran a season-best of 11.01 for third place.

Kemba Nelson was fifth in a season-best 11.14.

Shannon Ray won the Women’s ‘B’ final in 11.04 (2.7m/s) over Ashley Henderson (11.12) and Jamaica’s Remona Burchell (11.15). Jonielle Smith (11.18).

Earlier, Andrenette Knight set the tone for Caribbean athletes when she won the 400m hurdles in 54.90s in what was a Jamaican 1-3-4.

Knight, 26, who’s time was a season best, took the lead from the USAs Anna Cockrell at the sixth hurdle and never relinquished it holding off a late challenge from Cassandra Tate of the USA who finished in 55.06.

Shian Salmon ran a season-best 55.56 for third place with Rhonda Whyte fourth in the same time. Salmon got third by virtue of stopping the clock at 55.551 to Whyte’s 55.556.

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn won the 100m hurdles in 12.17 aided by a 3.5m/s wind. Finishing second was Jamaica’s Danielle Williams, who clocked 12.38 while the USA’s Tonea Marshall third in 12.39. Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper was fourth in 12.47.

Jamal Britt of the USA won the 110m hurdles in 12.99 (4.0 m/s). Eric Edwards finished second in 13.07 with Freddie Crittenden third in 13.13 in a USA 1-2-3. Tyler Mason (13.30) and Damion Thomas (13.38) were fourth and fifth, respectively.

First-year pro, Abby Steiner outclassed the field to win the 200m in 22.06 holding off Bahamian Anthonique Strachan (22.34) was second while Mackenzie Dunmore was third in 22.50. Jamaica’s Ashanti Moore was fourth in 22.78.

 In a dramatic conclusion to the Women’s long jump, Tara Davis-Woodhall leaped out to a wind-aided 7.11m to win over rival Quanesha Burks, whose 7.04m had in her the lead until Davis-Woodhall’s final jump.

Ruth Osoro of Nigeria jumped a personal best 6.82m for third place.

Will Claye won the triple jump with 17.45m over compatriot Donald Scott, who’s effort of 17.06m was the same as Jamaica’s Jordan Scott but was better on the countback.

A Jamaican women’s team of Remona Burchell, Ashanti Moore, Sashalee Forbes and Jonielle Smith won the 4x100m relay in 42.80 in a blanket finish with USA Red (42.83) and USA Blue (42.87).

The USA’s Men’s team of Christian Coleman, Kendall Williams, Josephus Lyles and Terrance Laird won the men’s sprint relay in 38.21 over USA Blue (38.81) and Jamaica – Damion Thomas, Kadrian Goldson, Jevaughn Whyte and Michael Campbell – was third in 39.51.

 

 

 

 

Devynne Charlton was the only Caribbean athlete to win an event but several others were on the podium at the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix at The Track at New Balance in Boston on Saturday.

The 27-year-old Bahamian, who won silver at the 2022 World Indoor Championships, clocked a season-best 7.87 whole holding off the challenge of Sharika Nelvis of the USA (7.93) and Celeste Mucci of Australia, who ran a personal best of 7.95.

Jamaica’s Danielle Williams ran 7.97 for fourth in the keenly contested battle for the minor place.

Meanwhile, 2022 World Indoor 400m champion Jereem Richards was nipped on the line by Noah Williams of the USA in a tight three-way finish.

The Trinidadian led most of the way but tightened up over the last 50m when Williams jumped at the chance to get past him on the inside to take the race by 0.04s.

Both were given the same time of 45.88. However, on closer inspection, Williams clocked 45.876 to Richards’ 45.880.

Vernon Norwood finished third in 45.92.

Jamaican’s Leah Anderson and Janieve Russell finished second and third, respectively, in the Women’s 500m in which Fembke Bol unleashed a new world’s best performance.

The Dutch athlete, who won silver in the 400m hurdles in Oregon in 2022, demonstrated superior speed and strength to pull away from the field and win in 1:05.63 to become the first woman to run faster than 1:06.00 in the event.

It was a new personal best, national record and world record.

Anderson made a late surge to get by Russell in the final stages to establish a new Jamaican national record of 1:08.34.

Russell, the now two-time Commonwealth Games 400m hurdles champion, faded to third in 1:09.18.

The Women’s 60m dash was billed as a clash between World 200m champion Shericka Jackson of Jamaica and World and Olympic 400m hurdles champion Sydney McLaughlin-Levrone.

Somebody forgot about Aleia Hobbs, who just last week ran 6.98 over 60m, tied for the ninth fastest time ever with Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Elaine Thompson-Herah.

But while both Jackson and McLaughlin-Levrone failed to make the final finishing fifth in the respective heats, Hobbs dominated the field to take the final in 7.02 ahead of training partner Mikiah Brisco, who ran a season best 7.10.

Celera Barnes ran 7.21 for third in the American sweep.

Noah Lyles edged Trayvon Brommel by the smallest of margins to win the men’s event in a personal best 6.51 (6.507). Brommel 6.51 (6.509) took the runner-up spot.

Ghana’s Benjamin Azamati clocked 6.62 for third.

 

Olympic bronze medallist Megan Tapper, 2015 World champion Danielle Williams and 2022 World Indoor silver medallist Devynne Charlton all advanced to the final of the Women’s 100m hurdles at the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham on Friday.

Jamaica’s Tapper and The Bahamas’ Charlton ran times of 12.68 and 12.70, respectively, to finish first and second in heat two and advance.

Williams advances after finishing second in heat one in 12.80 behind England’s Cindy Sember (12.67).

World Champion and world record holder Tobi Amusan of Nigeria qualified for the final fastest with a time of 12.40 to win heat three.

Jamaica also qualified for the final of the Men’s 4x400m relay after a second-place finish in heat one.

The quartet of Karayme Bartley, Anthony Cox, Navasky Anderson and Javon Francis combined to run 3:05.20 to finish behind Botswana (3:05.11).

Trinidad & Tobago (3:07.12) and Barbados (3:07.23) finished third and fourth in heat two and also booked spots in the final.

In the field, Jamaica’s Ackelia Smith (6.35m) and Trinidad & Tobago’s Tyra Gittens (6.28m) both advanced to the final of the Women’s long jump.

Jasmine Camacho-Quinn, Brittany Anderson and Megan Tapper all looked comfortable as six Caribbean women safely advanced to the semi-finals of the 100m hurdles at the World Athletics Championships in Eugene on Saturday.

Anderson, who won her first Jamaican national title in June, was first up and comfortably advanced to the semi-finals with 12.60 to win heat one.

There was also a major casualty in the first heat as defending world champion Nia Ali of the USA failed to advance after clipping the ninth hurdle and falling to the track.

Olympic champion Jasmine Camacho-Quinn of Puerto Rico was next up, running 12.52 to win heat two ahead of Bahamian world indoor silver medallist Devynne Charlton (12.69).

Jamaican 2015 world champion Danielle Williams finished second in heat three with 12.87 to advance. Nigeria’s Tobi Amusan cruised to a new national record 12.40 to win the heat.

Costa Rica’s Andrea Carolina Vargas ran 13.12 for third in heat four to advance.

Tapper, bronze medallist at the Olympics last year, ran 12.73 to finish second behind American Alia Armstrong (12.48) in heat five and progress.

World leader and world record holder Kendra Harrison of the USA ran 12.60 to win heat six and advance.

Anderson Peters set a new meet record in the javelin while there were podium places for Rushell Clayton and Kyron McMaster at the Diamond League meeting in Stockholm, Sweden on Thursday.

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