LaLiga president Javier Tebas has stated the breakaway European Super League is "dead", deeming the controversial concept "impossible" after nine of the 12 clubs involved pulled out.

The announcement of the planned competition led to a huge backlash, including from governing bodies, rival clubs, fans, players and media, leading to the majority of the teams that had signed up making a quick U-turn.

UEFA issued fines to Atletico Madrid, Inter, Milan, and the six Premier League clubs – Arsenal, Chelsea, Liverpool, Manchester City, Manchester United and Tottenham - but a court ruling meant disciplinary proceedings against Barcelona, Real Madrid and Juventus, the three founding members yet to cut ties with the Super League, had to be halted.

A preliminary injunction was granted by a judge in Spain, with the case heading to the European Court of Justice.

Barca president Joan Laporta recently said his own club will not apologise for "wanting to be the owners of our own destiny", while he also insisted the project remains very much alive.

However, speaking on a media call on Wednesday, Tebas made clear Barca are incorrect to make such an assessment, considering the mass exodus.

"I've spoken with Barca executives in recent days. They believe they should keep doing what they're doing and I think they're wrong," Tebas said. 

"The concept of the Super League is impossible. Nine of the twelve clubs have asked to dissolve the company they founded."

He added: "The model they're defending, without the English clubs... I think it's dead.

"Laporta says the courts have said they're in the right, but that's not true, it's one judge in Madrid and an injunction.

"I've tried to convince them that they're wrong and should work along other lines."

Tebas was also asked about Lionel Messi's future, making clear Barca will not be allowed any leeway in terms of LaLiga's salary cap to make sure the superstar remains at Camp Nou.

Barcelona have already been busy in the transfer market as they reshape their squad, adding forward duo Sergio Aguero and Memphis Depay on free transfers, as well as centre-back Eric Garcia.

"LaLiga has its rules and Barca know that. They know that they have to lower their salary costs by a lot," said Tebas, who hopes to have stadiums 60 per cent full when the 2021-22 season begins, despite the continued impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

"Messi is the same as Sergio Aguero or anyone else that they are adding. We will not make any exception for Messi to stay here."

Joan Laporta insists Barcelona will not apologise for "wanting to be the owners of our own destiny" in am impassioned defence of the doomed European Super League.

The contentious project failed to get off the ground after nine of the 12 founding members pulled out amid a furious backlash to competition.

Last month, UEFA issued fines to Atletico Madrid, Inter, Milan, and the six Premier League teams involved but a court ruling meant disciplinary proceedings against Barca, Real Madrid and Juventus – the three teams yet to cut ties with the Super League – had to be halted.

Barca president Laporta remains adamant the Super League will still go ahead in some guise in the future as he issued a note of defiance when addressing the club's general assembly, where he explained a vote on participation in the competition was no longer necessary as the format no longer existed.

"We spoke with the clubs [involved] and said we liked [the proposals], but that we needed them to accept that our members would have to approve entry at the next assembly," Laporta said.

"It was logical to have that vote before June 30. But now, as the format doesn't exist, I won't ask you to vote. But the project is alive, I insist.

"We're still trying to enter into dialogue with UEFA. We won't apologise for trying to organise a competition. We won't say sorry to UEFA for wanting to be the owners of our own destiny. At least not while I am president."

Manchester United, Liverpool, Manchester City, Arsenal, Chelsea and Tottenham had all signed up as participants from the Premier League.

Laporta suggested the English teams may now be rueing their decision to withdraw.

"The English clubs were the competition's driving force and they got scared under pressure from UEFA," he added.

"I think they regret leaving the Super League now, seeing how UEFA have backtracked on their threats."

Laporta claimed the Super League would have been worth "€700m in addition to variables" for Barca, a sum that would have helped boost the coffers of a club reportedly over €1.2billion in debt.

On Sunday, a vote agreed to accept a loan from Goldman Sachs worth up to €525million, money that Laporta insists will not be used on transfers.

"We're talking about the viability of the club," Laporta said prior to members voting. 

"No one should think that this money will be for signings or other projects. We have to stop the bleeding."

Disciplinary proceedings against Barcelona, Juventus and Real Madrid for their involvement in the European Super League have been halted.

UEFA had opened an investigation into the trio after their role in the breakaway competition, which was met with widespread backlash as plans crumbled within 48 hours of being announced.

On Wednesday the European governing body released a statement to confirm that its appeals body had decided to stay the proceedings.

"Following the opening of disciplinary proceedings against FC Barcelona, Juventus FC and Real Madrid CF for a potential violation of UEFA's legal framework in connection with the so-called 'Super League' project, the UEFA Appeals Body has decided to stay the proceedings until further notice," the statement read.

The closed-shop Super League would have guaranteed yearly entry to its founder clubs, who could be joined by a small group of select guest teams.

The six Premier League clubs who signed up subsequently pulled out and have been warned against a repeat of their rebellion.

A joint statement from the Premier League and Football Association said they will face 30-point deductions and fines of £25million if they sign up to any similar proposals.

UEFA's proceedings against Barca, Real and Juve were launched late last month, with heavy punishments expected for the trio.

Juve chairman Andrea Agnelli has been seen as a driving force behind the organisation of the tournament, which was announced on April 18 before quickly descending into farce.

In response to the appeals body's decision to issue a stay, UEFA released a statement outlining its intent to "defend its position".

"UEFA understands why the disciplinary proceedings needed to be suspended for the time being, but remains confident in and will continue to defend its position in all the relevant jurisdictions," it read.

"The legitimacy of sports disciplinary procedures, with the right to appeal to the Court of Arbitration of Sport, has long been recognised as being essential to the uniform administration of justice in sport.

"The European Court of Human Rights, EU Courts and the Swiss Federal Tribunal have repeatedly ruled that disciplinary/arbitration rules are justified by legitimate interests linked to the specific nature of the sport. UEFA, therefore, acted in accordance with not only its Statutes and Regulations, but also with EU law, the European Convention on Human Rights and Swiss law in opening an independent investigation into the conduct of the clubs associated with this so-called 'Super League' project.

"UEFA will take all necessary steps in strict accordance with national and EU law in order for the UEFA Appeals Body to be in a position to resume the disciplinary proceedings as soon as possible."

The Premier League's 'big six' will face 30-point deductions and fines of £25million if they sign up to another breakaway competition following the European Super League farce.

Arsenal, Chelsea, Liverpool Manchester City, Manchester United and Tottenham were six of the 12 founding members behind an attempted closed-shop competition that was announced back in April.

The Super League would have guaranteed yearly entry to its founder clubs, who could be joined by a small group of select guest teams.

But the tournament imploded within 48 hours after a huge public backlash led to the six English clubs rescinding their involvement.

While UEFA praised those who accepted they had made a mistake, in early May the governing body confirmed they were to be hit with a five per cent sacrifice of their European competition revenue plus a collective £13m donation to the organisation.

A Club Commitment Declaration was also signed, with the agreement including fines of up to £87m for each team as a deterrent against any future rebellion.

Although reports initially suggested the other 14 Premier League clubs were divided on sanctions, the competition has now outlined its own punishments, which include a similar commitment to avoid future threats of a breakaway.

Firstly, a combined settlement figure of £22m will be paid to the Premier League, but if any of the big six sign up to another similar competition, they will be liable to pay £25m each and face 30-point deductions as per the agreement.

A joint statement from the Premier League and Football Association read: "The six clubs involved in proposals to form a European Super League have today acknowledged once again that their actions were a mistake, and have reconfirmed their commitment to the Premier League and the future of the English game.

"They have wholeheartedly apologised to their fans, fellow clubs, the Premier League and the FA.

"As a gesture of goodwill, the clubs have collectively agreed to make a contribution of £22million which will go towards the good of the game, including new investment in support for fans, grassroots football and community programmes.

"Furthermore, the clubs have agreed to support rule changes so that any similar actions in the future would lead to a 30-point deduction. Each of the six clubs, in that event, was also be subject to an additional £25million fine.

"The Premier League and the FA have worked closely together throughout this process and this agreement brings both investigations into the matter to a conclusion."

Manchester United executive co-chairman Joel Glazer has pledged to "invest in the transfer market" and promised supporters they will have a more significant voice in how the club is run. 

Glazer attended his first fans' forum meeting since his family took over the Premier League giants in 2005 and laid out his plans for how the club intends to improve dialogue and consultation with supporters.  

Glazer attended the meeting after United supporters were left furious by the club's decision to sign up for the doomed European Super League in April.

That led to protests before United's Premier League clash with Liverpool on May 2, with a group of fans breaking into Old Trafford and invading the pitch.

The game was ultimately postponed and replayed 11 days later, United suffering a 4-2 defeat to their bitter rivals. 

A fans' forum had put a four-point plan to Glazer and asked for a fan share scheme giving supporters voting rights, support for a fan-led government review, the appointment of independent directors to the board, and regular consultation with season ticket holders on major decisions.

Those proposals appear to have been taken on board by the club, with Glazer announcing the creation of a fan advisory board to consult with the club's senior leadership and owners, in addition to a strengthened fans' forum.

The board will be made up of representatives from the forum and key fan groups to ensure the fans' perspective is embedded within the club's decision-making processes, a statement on the United website said.

Glazer also outlined plans for a fan share scheme, which will involve a new class of shares that carry the same voting rights as the shares owned by the Glazer family.

The statement said "this would establish a foundation for supporters to build a meaningful ownership stake and create a new spirit of partnership with the club".

Speaking at the meeting, Glazer said: "Our goal is to win every competition we compete in, and we will continue to invest in our academy and in the transfer market to support the manager in an effort to meet the club's goals.  

"As a club we have devoted a lot of time and resources over the last several years updating and further developing our vast global scouting network to adapt to the modern football environment. This is a project that should provide a foundation for long-term success in the years to come. 

"Old Trafford is at the heart of Manchester United and while we have spent over £100million over the last 10 years on infrastructure projects, we will now accelerate the process of planning much more significant investment and upgrades to the stadium.

"Rest assured, we will consult with supporters throughout the process to end up with a result we can all be proud of.

"The same goes for our training ground.  Preliminary planning work is already under way and there will be significant funding available to further enhance our facilities and ensure they remain world class."

Juventus chairman and vice-chairman of the proposed European Super League Andrea Agnelli insists the attempted breakaway from UEFA was a "desperate cry for help" rather than a "coup".

Agnelli previously served as an executive and chairman of the European Club Association, an independent body that represents football clubs at a continental level, acting as a "voice" for teams and key stakeholder in the landscape of the game internationally.

But the 45-year-old stepped down from the ECA in April as he officially became a key figure for the Super League, a breakaway, closed-shop competition that threatened the competitive nature of European football.

Juve were one of 12 clubs to be announced as founding members of the league, but a backlash quickly led to the withdrawal of all six English clubs involved, followed by Atletico Madrid, Inter and Milan.

Juve, Real Madrid and Barcelona have stood firm and affirmed their commitment to radical change, a stance that has subsequently seen UEFA open disciplinary proceedings against all three.

Agnelli addressed the media on Friday in a news conference arranged to bid farewell to sporting director Fabio Paratici, who is reportedly close to joining Tottenham, and the Juve chief again stressed the need for reform.

"For years I have tried to change European competitions from the inside, because the signs of crisis were evident even before the pandemic," he told reporters.

"The Super League is not a coup, but a desperate cry of help for a system that, knowingly or not, is heading towards insolvency.

"The agreement between the founders [of the Super League] was conditional on UEFA's prior recognition of the competition. The response was deafening, with offensive terms and arrogant methods, and then it turned to three clubs.

"It is not with this type of behaviour that football is reformed in the face of this crisis. Fortunately, I know that not everyone in UEFA feels the same way. The desire for dialogue, however, remains unchanged.

"Other sports have faced changes of this type, and almost all stakeholders agree that the model needs to be changed.

"Juventus, Barcelona and Real Madrid are determined to achieve a complete reform of the competitions, and above all, in the interest of the clubs that show us fear for this situation."

UEFA has begun disciplinary proceedings against European giants Barcelona, Real Madrid and Juventus over their role in the collapsed Super League.

The announcement from European football's governing body could result in heavy punishments for Spanish titans Barca and Madrid and Italian heavyweights Juventus.

UEFA said in a statement: "Following an investigation conducted by UEFA ethics and disciplinary inspectors in connection with the so-called 'Super League' project, disciplinary proceedings have been opened against Real Madrid CF, FC Barcelona and Juventus FC for a potential violation of UEFA's legal framework.

"Further information will be made available in due course."

Juve chairman Andrea Agnelli has been seen as a driving force behind the organisation of the tournament, which was announced on April 18 but fell apart just 48 hours later when the six English teams that had entered all withdrew.

The proposed competition guaranteed participation for the 12 founding teams.

But the anti-competitive tournament prompted outrage around the football world, and pressure from fans, players, coaches, governing bodies, governments and the media soon told.

Once the Premier League clubs – Manchester United, Manchester City, Liverpool, Arsenal, Tottenham and Chelsea – pulled out, it was clear the project would not be viable.

Milan, Inter and Atletico Madrid soon followed.

However, there has been reluctance from Juve, Barca and Madrid to let the Super League die.

Amid urging from UEFA and others to back away from the project, those clubs collaborated on May 8 to defend their actions.

The three clubs stated: "The founding clubs have suffered, and continue to suffer, unacceptable third-party pressures, threats, and offences to abandon the project and therefore desist from their right and duty to provide solutions to the football ecosystem via concrete proposals and constructive dialogue.

"This is intolerable under the rule of law and tribunals have already ruled in favour of the Super League proposal, ordering FIFA and UEFA to, either directly or through their affiliated bodies, refrain from taking any action which may hinder this initiative in any way while court proceedings are pending."

They stressed that "structural reforms are vital to ensure our sport remains appealing and survives in the long-term."

Madrid, Barca and Juve claim the Super League provided "a unique opportunity to offer fans around the world the best possible show and to reinforce global interest in the sport".

UEFA has begun disciplinary proceedings against European giants Barcelona, Real Madrid and Juventus over their role in the collapsed Super League.

The announcement from European football's governing body could result in heavy punishments for Spanish titans Barca and Madrid and Italian heavyweights Juventus.

UEFA said in a statement: "Following an investigation conducted by UEFA ethics and disciplinary inspectors in connection with the so-called 'Super League' project, disciplinary proceedings have been opened against Real Madrid CF, FC Barcelona and Juventus FC for a potential violation of UEFA's legal framework.

"Further information will be made available in due course."

Gianni Infantino has denied FIFA colluded with clubs on the controversial Super League but stopped short of saying there had been no talks about the project.

The president of world football's governing body spoke out on Friday after the FIFA congress, describing the Super League attempted breakaway as "a rupture" in the game.

Asked whether FIFA had any involvement in the Super League planning or if it had offered support, Infantino gave a nine-minute response in which he said it was his job to always listen to anybody in the game considering a new format.

LaLiga president Javier Tebas recently accused Infantino of encouraging the Super League, but the FIFA chief rebutted that claim.

"Let me tell you that when we are analysing these questions, we should look at the facts and not rumours or corridor gossip, especially not coming from certain parts," Infantino said.

The proposed new competition was announced and quashed in the space of around 48 hours in April, a breath-taking episode that saw players, coaches, supporter groups, national associations, politicians and even royalty express dismay at the closed-door concept.

Liverpool, Manchester United, Manchester City, Chelsea, Arsenal and Tottenham announced they would be taking part, as did Barcelona, Real Madrid and Atletico Madrid from LaLiga, and Serie A giants Juventus, Milan and Inter also signed up. The project, a major threat to the UEFA Champions League, collapsed dramatically, but there are some who expect it to be revived.

"I know many clubs," Infantino told reporters in a conference call. "I speak with clubs for many years, since my days at UEFA, and when speaking to European clubs the Super League topic always is a topic for discussion.

"Everyone in football knows that, so let's not play games here. Everyone in football knows for years clubs have been studying and preparing for this or similar projects.

"In the 16 years I was in UEFA we always managed that, and I can tell you there were projects that were far more advanced than the one we have seen recently.

"At FIFA it is also my responsibility and our responsibility to discuss with football stakeholders. Now to listen to some clubs and to speak with some clubs doesn't certainly mean in any way whatsoever that FIFA was behind, was colluding, was plotting or I don't know what words you used for any Super League project."

Infantino pointed to a FIFA statement issued in January that said a breakaway competition would not be recognised by the world body.

"In that moment, the rupture was of course becoming inevitable and the rupture is never good, it's not good for anyone," Infantino said on Friday. "No war is good – never. We are ready to defend football from projects we know are wrong."

He added: "I don't close the doors to any discussion with anyone – never – about new formats, new ideas, new competitions. I'm ready to listen to everyone.

"This is my job ... the way I live the presidency of FIFA.

"I'm aware some people prefer to spin these discussions in a different way and I can understand that attacking me or FIFA is a good way to divert the attention from real problems that have never been addressed in the last years."

Infantino did not specify his target for that remark, but said: "I hope that as of today we can move to the real issues that football is facing."

Liverpool have announced plans to create a new supporters board to give fan representation at executive levels of the club and put them "at the heart of its decision-making processes".

The plans, which will be formalised before next season, come in the wake of fan-led protests over Liverpool's involvement in the failed European Super League.

Reds owner John Henry signed the club up for the breakaway project last month before they backed out, with the American later issuing an apology where he acknowledged fans had been "let down".

Subsequent talks between Liverpool chief executive Billy Hogan, the Spirit of Shankly (SOS) group and official supporters' trust members has seen the creation of a "new engagement model".

According to a club statement, this promises "deeper consultation with supporters on fan-facing strategic decisions".

The Reds said the consultation process will be enshrined in the club's Articles of Association and a legally binding memorandum of understanding between the club and the Official Liverpool Supporters Trust will be entered into.

"The supporters board will hold regular meetings with the club and the chair will be invited to attend LFC's main board meetings when fan-facing strategic matters arise," the statement posted on the club's website said. 

"The existing fan forums structure will remain in place but will be reshaped into three main working groups to cover ticketing, matchday experience and equality, diversity and inclusion.

"This will ensure operational issues and projects continue to be discussed by club officials and supporters. When appropriate, these matters will also be represented at the supporters board level."

Liverpool made the announcement on the same day they revealed their new kit for the 2021-22 season.

Hogan said: "The focus over the last few weeks of dialogue has been to find a long-term solution that is in the best interests of Liverpool and its supporters – one that we firmly believe is not only meaningful but also wholly in keeping with the values and aspirations of the club.

"While these changes are significant, it is important to stress that the current fan forums have also worked incredibly well since they were introduced four years ago and it is crucial that they continue in addition to the supporters board in order to give us a range of engagement options.

"There is still a lot to discuss with representatives of the Liverpool Supporters Trust in the weeks ahead but having these principles in place is a great step forward and we look forward to formalising the details of the structure."

Joe Blott, chair of SOS, added: "After discussions of the past weeks, we believe this is a unique deal and recommend its acceptance. 

"We see this as a chance to help shape the future of our club and put us at the forefront of changing football in general."

UEFA has opened a disciplinary investigation against Barcelona, Juventus and Real Madrid, the three clubs who are yet to withdraw from the European Super League.

Nine of the original 12 founding teams involved in the controversial project – including all six English clubs – have renounced the competition and promised to take all possible steps to remove themselves from it.

They all agreed a peace accord with UEFA last week that saw them recommit to the current structures of club and international football.

As part of the deal, those nine teams also accepted light punishments including goodwill payments to UEFA and a small portion of their prize money being withheld.

But Barca, Juve and Madrid are yet to terminate their involvement and on Saturday insisted the breakaway project was lawful, hitting out at "intolerable" pressure and vowing to persevere. 

When announcing their agreement with the nine clubs who came back into the fold, UEFA said it would "take whatever action it deems appropriate" against the remaining three.

That process has now begun, as UEFA released a statement on Wednesday confirming the disciplinary probe.

It read: "In accordance with Article 31(4) of the UEFA disciplinary regulations, UEFA ethics and disciplinary inspectors have today been appointed to conduct a disciplinary investigation regarding a potential violation of UEFA's legal framework by Real Madrid, Barcelona and Juventus in connection with the so-called 'Super League' project.

"Further information regarding this matter will be made available in due course."

Speaking last week, UEFA president Aleksander Ceferin discussed the recent developments, praising the nine clubs for stepping back from the Super League.

"I said at the UEFA Congress that it takes a strong organisation to admit making a mistake especially in these days of trial by social media," he said.

"In accepting their commitments and willingness to repair the disruption they caused, UEFA wants to put this chapter behind it and move forward in a positive spirit.

"The measures announced are significant, but none of the financial penalties will be retained by UEFA. They will all be reinvested into youth and grassroots football in local communities across Europe, including the UK.

"These clubs have done just that, recognised their mistakes quickly and have taken action to demonstrate their contrition and future commitment to European football.

"The same cannot be said for the clubs that remain involved in the so-called 'Super League' and UEFA will deal with those clubs subsequently."

Tottenham have promised to set up a fan panel that will have a direct line to the club's board as part of attempts to assuage anger over their involvement in the Super League.

Spurs were one of 12 clubs, including the rest of the Premier League's 'big six', who signed up to the creation of a new European competition in which founding members could not be relegated.

After a furious reaction from fans and former players, and some concern expressed by certain sponsors of the clubs, nine of the 12 teams formally withdrew from the plans and pledged their commitment to recognised UEFA competitions. Only Real Madrid, Barcelona and Juventus have yet to renounce the Super League.

In a statement, Spurs said they signed up to the plans "with the expectation that the format, rules and structures would evolve through dialogue with key parties, namely the Premier League, FA, UEFA, FIFA and, crucially, fans". They said the "access system" – which would have allowed only five different teams, outside the founders, to qualify each season – was misguided, adding: "We wholeheartedly regret that we involved the club and that the legal process itself meant we were unable to consult our fans early on – we apologise unreservedly."

As part of a drive towards cooling supporter anger and ensuring fan views are taken into account in the running of the club, Spurs say they will establish a "Club Advisory Panel" comprising "elected representatives from the different constituencies of our fanbase, inclusive and reflective of our fans’ diversity".

The chair of the panel will also be appointed as a non-executive board member, a move the club hopes will provide "authentic, genuine representation and will ensure fans are at the heart of club decision-making".

The move comes after Chelsea announced they would allow three fan representatives to sit in on board meetings from July 1.

Spurs have also expressed their support for a review into football governance led by the United Kingdom government, which was put into action by culture secretary Oliver Dowden in the wake of the Super League fiasco.

Despite their pledge, Spurs also said they are disappointed that the Tottenham Hotspur Supporters' Trust (THST) has not yet met with the club – although they are not prepared to discuss changes in the executive board.

They added: "The THST, with whom we have worked and, indeed, promoted, for 20 years has called for the resignations of the executive board over the ESL – individuals who have lived and breathed this club for the best part of two decades. We have offered on several occasions to meet board-to-board and discuss an open agenda – excluding a change of club ownership and the resignation of the board. Our door remains open on this basis."

Barcelona, Real Madrid and Juventus have described warnings from UEFA as "intolerable" and "unacceptable" as the three clubs continue to back a breakaway European Super League.

Spain's biggest two clubs and Italian outfit Juve are the only three remaining of the 12 European giants who signed up for the controversial project, with all others having withdrawn just days after the competition was announced last month.

UEFA on Friday stated that Manchester United, Liverpool, Manchester City, Tottenham, Arsenal, Chelsea, Milan, Inter Milan and Atletico Madrid would not face Champions League or Europa League bans after pulling out of the proposed Super League.

The governing body warned that the three remaining rebel clubs could be sanctioned due to their unwavering stance.

UEFA stated: "UEFA has reserved all rights to take whatever action it deems appropriate against those clubs that have so far refused to renounce the so-called 'Super League'. The matter will promptly be referred to the competent UEFA disciplinary bodies."

Barca, Madrid and Juve released a joint statement on Saturday to make it clear they are not happy with UEFA's actions.

The statement said: "The founding clubs have suffered, and continue to suffer, unacceptable third-party pressures, threats, and offenses to abandon the project and therefore desist from their right and duty to provide solutions to the football ecosystem via concrete proposals and constructive dialogue.

"This is intolerable under the rule of law and tribunals have already ruled in favour of the Super League proposal, ordering FIFA and UEFA to, either directly or through their affiliated bodies, refrain from taking any action which may hinder this initiative in any way while court proceedings are pending."

The three clubs defended the Super League proposal by stating that "structural reforms are vital to ensure our sport remains appealing and survives in the long-term".

They added that the founding clubs agreed that the new competition would only take place if it was "recognised by UEFA and/or FIFA or if, in accordance with applicable laws and regulations, it was deemed to be a competition duly compatible for all purposes with the continuity of the founding clubs in their respective domestic competitions".

Juve, Barca and Madrid claim the Super League provided "a unique opportunity to offer fans around the world the best possible show and to reinforce global interest in the sport".

The trio of clubs say they are "ready to reconsider the proposed approach" but it would be "highly irresponsible" if they abandoned a mission to "provide effective and sustainable answers to the existential questions that threaten the football industry".

Manchester United co-chairman Joel Glazer has promised to discuss the issue of fans owning shares in the Red Devils and acknowledged disgruntled supporters' calls for change after a week of turmoil at the club.

Glazer provided a written response on United's official website to a letter from a fans' forum, which had demanded increased consultation with supporters in the aftermath of the decision to sign up for the doomed European Super League.

It marks the first statement from Glazer since supporters protested against the owners prior to Sunday's scheduled Premier League fixture with Liverpool. A group of fans, who are still banned from attending matches due to the coronavirus pandemic, broke into Old Trafford and invaded the pitch, while hundreds of others gathered at the Lowry Hotel to stop the team leaving to play the game, which was postponed and rescheduled for Thursday.

A four-point plan put to Glazer asked for a fan share scheme giving supporters voting rights, support for a fan-led government review, the appointment of independent directors to the board, and regular consultation with season ticket holders on major decisions.

In response, Glazer wrote: "As one of the few European football clubs listed on the public markets, we believe in the principle of fans owning shares in the club. 

"We have previously engaged with the Manchester United Supporters' Trust on fan share ownership and we want to continue and accelerate those discussions, together with provisions to enhance associated fan consultation.

"In particular, I want to acknowledge the need for change, with deeper consultation with you [fans forum] as our main fan representative body across a range of important issues, including the competitions we play in. 

"We also recognise the importance of fan and football interests being embedded in key decision-making processes at every level of the club, and we are open to constructive discussions on how to reinforce that principle."

Glazer said he will "willingly and openly" engage with the government's fan-led review into football and described it as "a positive opportunity to explore new structures for fan engagement and influence".

He also once again apologised "for the mistakes that were made" in relation to United's involvement in the proposed breakaway Super League, which received huge backlash due to the closed-shop nature of the competition.

"I want to acknowledge the need for change, with deeper consultation with you as our main fan representative body across a range of important issues, including the competitions we play in," he added. 

"We also recognise the importance of fan and football interests being embedded in key decision-making processes at every level of the club, and we are open to constructive discussions on how to reinforce that principle.

"We remain committed to working with the wider football community to make the game stronger and more sustainable over the long-term, and we will now refocus our efforts on doing this within the existing structures of UEFA and the Premier League."

Speaking prior to the second leg of United's Europa League semi-final against Roma this week, manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer said fans must be allowed to protest peacefully but felt last Sunday's actions went "too far".

"It was a difficult day for us," Solskjaer said.

"Of course we wanted to play and beat Liverpool, for the fans, even. Our job has to be getting good results on the pitch, that's the players' focus, my focus, but as I said before the game, we have to listen, hear the fans' voices, it's everyone's right to protest.

"But it has to be in a peaceful manner. Unfortunately, when you break in, when police get injured, scarred for life, that's one step too far, and when it gets out of hand like this, it's a police matter, it's not about opinions anymore."

Manchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer believes supporters' protests against the club's owners went "too far" as they led to the postponement of Sunday's Premier League clash with Liverpool.

The club's involvement in the breakaway European Super League, which swiftly collapsed, had reignited lingering resentment of the ownership at Old Trafford.

The Glazers, who acquired the club through a leveraged buyout in 2005, have long been unpopular but became the subject of increased criticism in recent weeks.

Fans surrounded The Lowry Hotel, where United stay before home matches, on Sunday, letting off red smoke bombs and leading anti-Glazer chants.

The demonstration did not end there, however, with some supporters gaining access to the stadium and then the pitch, with flares hurled towards the directors' box and press area.

Although United and Liverpool confirmed their respective starting XIs, the match was postponed roughly an hour after the intended kick-off time.

A minority of United fans clashed with police officers outside the ground, and Solskjaer feels that – coupled with the trespassing at Old Trafford – meant some took their actions too far.

"It was a difficult day for us," Solskjaer said ahead of Thursday's Europa League semi-final second leg against Roma.

"Of course we wanted to play and beat Liverpool, for the fans, even. Our job has to be getting good results on the pitch, that's the players' focus, my focus, but as I said before the game, we have to listen, hear the fans' voices, it's everyone's right to protest.

"But it has to be in a peaceful manner. Unfortunately, when you break in, when police get injured, scarred for life, that's one step too far, and when it gets out of hand like this, it's a police matter, it's not about opinions anymore."

Other clubs involved in the attempted breakaway are trying to build bridges with supporters, with Chelsea announcing plans to have three fan representatives at board meetings from July.

Solskjaer accepts the communication with fans has to be better, and he understands United are already taking such steps.

"Of course, my focus has to be on the results, but you don't have to be a rocket scientist to see we have challenges to be dealt with, there's friction.

"Others have started discussing with fan groups already, which will be massive for us going forward.

"I would be sad if all the good work the players have done got disrupted. Our focus is on playing well and getting to a final now."

United co-owner Joel Glazer issued a public apology to United fans in the wake of the Super League's collapse, and Solskjaer has now revealed he received a personal message from the owners.

"I've been communicating with owners, I got a personal apology, they apologised to fans for how this came out," he continued. "I know they've started communications with other individuals.

"As I said, it's a difficult position for me to be in because I've got to focus on the football and I've always had a good relationship and they listen to me, they listen to the fans and I'm sure there'll be better communication coming."

But Solskjaer's focus is building on the 6-2 defeat of Roma last week and securing a first final appearance as United boss, which he hopes can at least temporarily serve as a welcome distraction.

"Sometimes frictions and challenges can move things forward," he said. "The last few weeks have been tough.

"I've had backing, I have to say. I've been put in charge and I'm responsible for the footballing matters, and I understand fans want to see trophies and progress.

"Hopefully we can get to a final tomorrow, that's the short-term fix, then we'll take it from there."

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