Rafael Nadal recovered from a second-set blip to progress to the quarter-finals of the US Open in style with victory over Marin Cilic.

Nadal needed to play just two matches to reach the fourth round and won each of them in straight sets, with Cilic presenting his first real challenge of the tournament.

However, Nadal's hugely impressive reaction after dropping the second set was that of a player still somehow operating at the peak of his incredible physical powers.

Cilic faded rapidly following a supreme third set from Nadal, who secured a 6-3 3-6 6-1 6-2 triumph in two hours, 48 minutes, booking a quarter-final with Diego Schwartzman.

Nadal began a run of three successive breaks in the fourth game, the key blow coming two games later as a superb flicked forehand gave him the initiative once more after Cilic had struck back.

Cilic fired wide on the return to give the Spaniard the opening set but the Croatian was a different animal in the second, pairing his unwavering ambition with accurate groundstrokes and deftness at the net.

He broke for a 3-1 lead as Nadal looped a mishit backhand long, an error that proved enough for Cilic to become the first player to take a set off the 18-time grand slam champion in the tournament.

Cilic's squaring of the match only served to fuel Nadal, however, and the world number two broke in the fourth game of the third in astonishing fashion.

Nadal twice attempted to lob Cilic and, after the Croatian met the second with a desperate smash, unleashed a cross-court backhand to bring up three break points, with the 2014 champion double-faulting on the first.

Another double fault gave Nadal a chance for the double break, which he took emphatically with a scintillating forehand down the line that had him jumping for joy in celebration.

The set was secured as Cilic went long on a return and it was clear the end was nigh when he sent down another double fault in the opening game of the fourth.

Cilic was eventually able to stem a run of nine successive Nadal games to avoid a bagel, but he was powerless to stop the three-time US Open winner taking another step towards a prospective final with Roger Federer, providing one final flourish with a glorious forehand around the net post in the decisive game.

 

STATISTICAL BREAKDOWN
Rafael Nadal [2] bt Marin Cilic [22] 6-3 3-6 6-1 6-2

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS
Nadal – 37/26
Cilic – 33/40

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS
Nadal – 11/6
Cilic – 10/5

BREAK POINTS WON
Nadal – 6/11
Cilic – 2/3

FIRST SERVE PERCENTAGE
Nadal – 57
Cilic – 66

PERCENTAGE OF POINTS WON ON FIRST/SECOND SERVE
Nadal – 83/48
Cilic – 59/46

TOTAL POINTS
Nadal – 109
Cilic – 86

Alexander Zverev was unable to pull off another five-set victory at the US Open as an error-strewn performance condemned him to a fourth-round loss to Diego Schwartzman marked by an umpiring controversy.

Zverev won the first set at Arthur Ashe Stadium in straightforward fashion but fell victim to a tremendous comeback from Schwartzman, who progressed to his second quarter-final in three years at Flushing Meadows.

Schwartzman came through 3-6 6-2 6-4 6-3 in over three hours, demonstrating devastating power off both wings and great touch at the net in a superb showing.

By contrast, Zverev's display was well below the standard that has seen him become established as one of the best young talents on the ATP Tour.

The 22-year-old has yet to make the breakthrough most expect of him, and his defeat on Monday owed to 65 unforced errors and 17 double faults.

Zverev was also docked a point that cost him the seventh game of the fourth set, allowing Schwartzman to go up 5-2, after being assessed a second code violation, the German left furious having claimed he did not hear the first.

Schwartzman wrapped up the win with a rasping forehand and will play either Rafael Nadal or Marin Cilic next.

On the prospect of playing Nadal, he told ESPN: "He's my friend, it's always great to play against him in quarter-finals of grand slams."

It has been a long road back to the top of men's tennis for Novak Djokovic, which will have made another betrayal by his body sting all the more on Sunday.

What may be even more painful for the world number one, however, is the realisation he could be about to lose ground in the race for his ultimate goal: the all-time record for men's grand slam singles titles.

Djokovic has made no secret of his desire to beat Roger Federer's leading tally, which stands at 20. However, his retirement due to a left shoulder injury after being thoroughly dismantled by Stan Wawrinka in the fourth round of the US Open has made that challenge even harder.

Through his struggles with an elbow problem, Djokovic saw eight slams go by without him lifting any of them, with six shared between Federer and Nadal.

That set him back significantly in his quest to take Federer's crown as the greatest of all time, and he will know his withdrawal makes it highly likely the Swiss star or Nadal will be collecting the US Open trophy come the end of the second week of proceedings at Flushing Meadows.

Federer and Nadal will be the heavy favourites to contest the final, with the former having the chance to move onto 21 and Nadal the opportunity to pull to within one of him on 19.

Djokovic does not believe this latest setback to be a long-term issue - he plans to play in Tokyo in four weeks' time - and was defiant when asked in his post-match media conference about his dream of catching Federer and Nadal.

"It's a long road ahead hopefully for me," Djokovic said. "I hope I can play for many more years. I'm planning to. I mean, I don't see an end behind the corner at all.

"Now it's a matter of keeping my body and mind in shape and trying to still peak at these kind of events that are majors and that are the most significant in our sport."

However, keeping his body in shape has proven easier said than done for Djokovic. This was his sixth retirement at a slam, albeit his first at the US Open, and at 32 it is easy to question just how long he will be able to remain at the highest level given that record of durability problems in majors.

Barring a breakthrough for Daniil Medvedev or perhaps a continuation of the Wawrinka resurgence in New York this week, Djokovic's task of claiming the slam record will be a more difficult one going into the 2020 season.

Having seen the career of Andy Murray – who is just seven days younger than Djokovic – completely derailed by injury, the Serbian should have an understanding that his time as one of the best in the world can be brought to an end at any moment.

By contrast, he will also be encouraged by the manner in which the now 38-year-old Federer has been able to extend his time as a grand slam champion well beyond the expected twilight of his career.

Federer, though, has been able to achieve that by reducing his playing schedule. The 2019 season was the first in which Federer has played the French Open since 2015 and he has only featured in 10 tournaments all year. 

Djokovic's insistence that he plans to play in Tokyo despite saying he has been in "constant pain" for weeks indicates he believes he can continue to have a very busy schedule and compete in grand slams.

His body is telling him otherwise.

The 16-time major winner is not one for giving up, which is what made his retirement against Wawrinka all the more surprising.

However, unless he accepts shifting to a lighter schedule is the best policy as he moves into his mid-30s, Djokovic may have to resign himself to the prospect of his moving to the top of the major pile never coming to pass.

Stan Wawrinka could see Novak Djokovic was struggling with his shoulder but was still surprised the world number one retired from their fourth-round match at the US Open.

Wawrinka produced a superb performance at Arthur Ashe Stadium, taking the first two sets 6-4 7-5 and leading 2-1 in the third before Djokovic succumbed to his shoulder problem on Sunday.

Djokovic double-faulted to gift Wawrinka a break early in the third set, before which the Serb had received treatment on the shoulder that hindered him in a second-round clash with Juan Ignacio Londero.

That prompted defending champion Djokovic to concede the match, giving Wawrinka a place in the quarter-finals, where he will face Daniil Medvedev.

Asked if he could sense something wrong with Djokovic in a rematch of the 2016 final won by the Swiss, Wawrinka told a media conference: "For me, my sense, I was feeling good on the court. I was playing well.

"The more the match was going, better I was playing, I was hitting really hard the ball. I was feeling great on the court. That's the most important.

"For sure I could see some little thing that he was in trouble. But I was most likely, most of the time, focused on myself because I know how well he can fight.

"I know how well he can come back. Doesn't matter how he's feeling on the court, and that's what I was focusing on."

"Yeah, it was," Wawrinka said when asked if the retirement was a shock. "It's always a surprise, for sure, when you play a champion like him.

"You always expect to play against the best of Novak. I saw he wasn't feeling great, but again, it was a surprise, for sure."

Djokovic was booed by large sections of the Arthur Ashe Stadium crowd as he left the court, a turn of events that also had Wawrinka taken aback in New York.

"[I'm] always surprised when you play the number one and you hear the fans booing him when he had to retire, that's for sure," he added.

"He's a good friend. I know him really well. He's [an] amazing champion, and if he has to retire, it's not the best for a tennis player to have to leave the court like that."

Wawrinka will likely have the crowd on his side against Medvedev, who has revelled in boos during his last two matches after being seen to direct a middle-finger gesture to the crowd in his third-round meeting with Feliciano Lopez.

Three-time grand slam champion Wawrinka understands how Medvedev can feed off negative energy, saying: "For sure I understand how you can get from any atmosphere. That's why you play.

"I understand the enjoyment of that, not only in positive but also in negative. You always look for something, and that's going to be interesting."

Novak Djokovic revealed he had been in constant pain for weeks after he retired from his US Open fourth-round match with Stan Wawrinka due to a shoulder injury.

Djokovic received massages on his shoulder at several junctures during his second-round meeting with Juan Ignacio Londero at Flushing Meadows.

However, the world number one appeared in much-improved condition in a third-round win over Denis Kudla on Friday, only for the issue to resurface as Wawrinka dictated Sunday's last-16 clash.

Wawrinka claimed the first two sets 6-4 7-5, with Djokovic receiving treatment prior to the third before conceding defeat following a double-fault that gave the Swiss another break of serve for a 2-1 lead.

After his title defence came to an end, Djokovic told a media conference: "The pain was constant for weeks now. Some days higher; some days with less intensity and obviously taking different stuff to kill the pain instantly. Sometimes it works; sometimes it doesn't.

"[It's] very frustrating. Obviously not the first, not the last player to get injured and to, you know, withdraw from one of the biggest events in sport.

"But obviously I just came off the court, so of course it hurts."

Djokovic was booed off by large sections of the Arthur Ashe Stadium crowd upon leaving the court but refused to blame them for doing so.

"Look, I'm not being offended by, you know, [being] mistreated by anybody," he added. "I don't really pay too much attention on that.

"I like to respect others. I hope that others can respect me and my decision.

"I'm sorry for the crowd. Obviously they came to see a full match, and just wasn't to be. That's all it is.

"A lot of people didn't know what's happening, so you cannot blame them. It is what it is."

Novak Djokovic bowed out of the US Open against Stan Wawrinka, while Roger Federer cruised into the quarter-finals on Sunday.

Wawrinka looked in fine form and was two-sets-to-love up when Djokovic, who has been dealing with a shoulder injury, retired on Arthur Ashe Stadium.

The world number one and defending champion's exit has opened up the top half of the draw, although Federer is starting to find some better form in New York.

 

DJOKOVIC DEPARTS AMID SHOULDER STRUGGLES

Wawrinka was leading Djokovic 6-4 7-5 2-1 when the Serbian retired, having earlier again received treatment on his left shoulder.

In a rematch of the 2016 final, Wawrinka – then the champion in four sets – looked in good form as he took control of the fourth-round clash.

The Swiss three-time grand slam champion has struggled with injuries in recent years, but seems to be getting close to his best form again.

The quarter-finals at Flushing Meadows add to his run to the last eight at the French Open.

 

FEDERER IN A RUSH

Federer, the five-time champion, needed just 79 minutes to thrash Belgian 15th seed David Goffin 6-2 6-2 6-0.

The 20-time major champion mixed 35 winners with 17 unforced errors in a ruthless victory.

Federer dropped the opening set in the first two rounds, but has now lost just nine games in his past two wins.

MEDVEDEV RUN CONTINUES, DIMITROV RESURGENT

Next up for Wawrinka is Daniil Medvedev, who continued his run with a 3-6 6-3 6-2 7-6 (7-2) win over qualifier Dominik Koepfer.

No player has more wins than the Russian on the ATP Tour this year and Medvedev is still embracing his villain status with the crowd in New York.

His win saw him move into the quarter-finals at a grand slam for the first time, with a tough clash against Wawrinka awaiting him.

Grigor Dimitrov moved into his first US Open quarter-final by beating Alex de Minaur 7-5 6-3 6-4.

The Bulgarian has reached the last eight at majors four times previously, but his clash against Federer will be his first grand slam quarter-final since the 2018 Australian Open.

Novak Djokovic is out of the US Open after retiring from his fourth-round match with Stan Wawrinka.

The Serbian battled a shoulder injury in his second-round win over Juan Ignacio Londero but appeared to suggest his condition had improved after a third-round defeat of Denis Kudla.

However, the world number one was second best throughout against the 2016 champion and called it quits after he dropped his serve to give Wawrinka a 6-4 7-5 2-1 lead in the third.

Wawrinka, who is in pursuit of his fourth major title, will play Daniil Medvedev for a place in the semi-finals.

Mike Bryan received a $10,000 fine from the US Open for mimicking pointing a gun at a line judge during a doubles match on Saturday.

Playing with his brother Bob Bryan, Mike Bryan received a code violation for unsportsmanlike conduct from chair umpire Mariana Alves during the second set of their match with Federico Delbonis and Roberto Carballes Baena.

The US Open subsequently assessed Mike Bryan the fine, which is the largest given to a male player at this year's grand slam, with the 41-year-old conceding his gesture could be deemed particularly inappropriate given the recent spate of shootings in the United States.

In a statement reported by the New York Times, Mike Bryan said: "I apologise for any offense I may have caused. We won the point and the gesture was meant to be playful.

"But given the recent news and political climate I understand how my gesture could be viewed as insensitive. I promise that I will never do anything like this again."

The Bryan brothers won the match in straight sets. Mike Bryan has claimed 18 grand slam doubles titles, 16 of those coming alongside Bob.

Roger Federer conceded he had expected a greater test from David Goffin after he trounced the world number 15 in three sets in the US Open fourth round.

Federer needed just an hour and 19 minutes to see off Goffin 6-2 6-2 6-0 and progress to a quarter-final with Grigor Dimitrov.

The 20-time grand slam champion has hit his stride since dropping a set in each of his first two matches, having dispatched Dan Evans for the loss of only five games in round three.

In his post-match media conference Federer was asked about the particularly emphatic nature of his win over Goffin, and revealed he had anticipated more from the Belgian.

"Sometimes these scores just happen. You catch a good day, the opponent doesn't, then things happen very quickly," Federer said.

"Maybe he struggled a bit early on. But I found my groove after a while and was able to roll really. Never looked back. David wasn't nearly as good as I expected him to be. He was struggling a little bit today. I was able to take advantage of it, and I think that's the key.

"In a fourth round like this, if you can keep it nice, short, simple, you have to take them. I'm very happy."

In Dimitrov, Federer faces a player enjoying a resurgence at Flushing Meadows, the Bulgarian reaching his first tour-level quarter-final since January by overcoming Alex de Minaur.

During his emergence Dimitrov was known by many as 'Baby Fed', and the Swiss still sees him as his closest competitor stylistically.

"I'm happy that things are going better for him after he won Cincinnati a couple of years ago. Also the World Tour Finals. He had a bit of a slump," Federer said.

"This is the big quarters for him, obviously with an opportunity against me. I'm aware of the fact it's a big match for him.

"I've done well against him in the past. But new match, new Grigor, new me again. I don't know where we're going to be, if it's day or night, all that stuff.

"But I like watching him. I like playing against him. Of course, when we play, it's as close as it gets to being a similar playing style. I think for both of us it's cool to play one another."

Roger Federer's quest to reach a first US Open final since 2015 continued at pace as he dismantled David Goffin in straight sets at Flushing Meadows.

Federer has breezed through the draw in New York and, despite going down an early break at Arthur Ashe Stadium, was able to enjoy another comfortable early afternoon triumph.

The 20-time grand slam champion needed only an hour and 19 minutes to complete a 6-2 6-2 6-0 triumph in imperious fashion

Having easily avoided falling at the same stage he did last year, Federer will now face either Grigor Dimitrov or Alex de Minaur for a place in the semi-finals.

Goffin produced early signs of a potential shock when he put Federer under pressure in the third game and the Swiss netted a backhand to surrender a break.

However, Federer swiftly responded in kind and then broke to love for a 4-2 lead before going on to take the first set in just 27 minutes.

Belgian Goffin pulled a backhand wide to give Federer the break and a 3-1 advantage in the second. However, Federer went down 0-40 on serve in the subsequent game and handed the break back with a double fault.

Yet a poor volley followed by a poor backhand from Goffin saw Federer take the initiative once more, and there were to be no further slip-ups from the 38-year-old as he raced to victory.

Goffin's third-set surrender was meek as Federer shifted through the gears, brilliantly dictating proceedings and pulling a tiring world number 15 from pillar to the post.

Federer wrapped things up in trademark style with stylish backhand down the line to delight the crowd and send him into the last eight.

 

STATISTICAL BREAKDOWN
Roger Federer [3] bt David Goffin 6-2 6-2 6-0

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS
Federer – 35/17
Goffin – 8/17

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS
Federer – 10/3
Goffin – 0/4

BREAK POINTS WON
Federer – 9/10
Goffin – 2/7

FIRST SERVE PERCENTAGE
Federer – 68
Goffin – 50

PERCENTAGE OF POINTS WON ON FIRST/SECOND SERVE
Federer – 83/40
Goffin – 40/27

TOTAL POINTS
Federer – 83
Goffin - 39

Rafael Nadal should head into the second week of the US Open with a spring in his step after another routine win at Flushing Meadows.

Nadal was the beneficiary of a walkover in his second-round match after Thanasi Kokkinakis' withdrawal and needed just under two hours to beat Hyeon Chung in the third round in New York on Saturday.

Spanish second seed Nadal – looking to reclaim the title he won in 2017 – will next face 2014 champion Marin Cilic, who won the battle of the big servers with John Isner.

While Nadal has enjoyed a routine first week, Alexander Zverev continued to showcase a flair for the dramatic, needing four sets to beat Aljaz Bedene and reach the last 16.

 

ZVEREV: EVERYTHING CAN BE BETTER

Sixth seed Zverev played three tie-break sets in overcoming Bedene 6-7 (4-7) 7-6 (7-4) 6-3 7-6 (7-3), requiring three hours, 36 minutes to get through to round four.

It was another marathon effort from the German, which came on the back of a pair of five-setters with Radu Albot and Frances Tiafoe.

Diego Schwartzman – a winner against Tennys Sandgren – is next for Zverev, who knows the difficulty of his match is only going to increase.

"It doesn't get easier, the opponents don't get easier, the matches don't get easier," he said.

"There's still a lot of things to improve. Obviously, I mean, if you go into details, we'll be here for a very long time. In general, the serving, the returning. Everything can still be better."


MONFILS PRODUCES MAGIC AT SECOND HOME

Gael Monfils went the distance against Denis Shapovalov, the 13th seed eventually prevailing 6-7 (5-7) 7-6 (7-4) 6-4 6-7 (6-8) 6-3.

Monfils' best grand slam results came at the 2008 French Open and in 2016 at Flushing Meadows, reaching the semi-finals on each occasion.

Asked if he feels if the US Open is his second home, Monfils replied: "Here is definitely the second for me, the second slam in my heart, the second biggest tournament in my heart for many reasons.

"Also New York, my idol is Arthur Ashe. Always something magic happen. I feel very good here."

Pablo Andujar is Monfils' next opponent. The 33-year-old progressed to the second week of a slam for the first time in his career with a 6-4 6-3 6-2 defeat of Alexander Bublik.


GAMER KYRGIOS STRUGGLES UNDER LIGHTS

Nick Kyrgios had a tough act to follow as he faced Andrey Rublev last on Arthur Ashe following the blockbuster clash between Naomi Osaka and Coco Gauff.

The enigmatic Australian could not live up to the occasion, losing 7-6 (7-5) 7-6 (7-5) 6-3, having conceded to finding it difficult to see during the match.

He was heard saying "Call of Duty will ruin my life" at one point. Asked about those remarks, the 28th seed replied: "I was just taking a shot because I game a lot.

"My eyes might have taken a while to adjust to the lights, yeah. Bit of a gamer."

His fellow Aussie Alexei Popyrin was beaten by Matteo Berrettini 6-4 6-4 6-7 (3-7) 7-6 (7-2).

There were not too many questions to be asked of Rafael Nadal's game after his routine win over Hyeon Chung at the US Open, so talk instead turned to his diet.

Nadal, who swept aside Chung 6-3 6-4 6-2 to reach the fourth round at Flushing Meadows, was asked in a post-match media conference about his diet by a reporter who heard he does not eat meat or cheese.

The 18-time grand slam champion responded: "I don't eat cheese. I never eat cheese in all my life. I don't like [it].

"The meat, I eat meat when I want to eat meat. I have nothing against the meat.

"I prefer fish. That's all. But I don't have big problems with [my] diet. I eat what I want to eat. And of course the diet is important for life and to stay healthy."

There may be a rise in pescatarian diets following Nadal's comments in the wake of a dominant performance.

The Spaniard battled injury earlier this year, a hip problem forcing him out of Indian Wells and Miami.

Nadal could hardly have looked in better shape against Chung, though, and asked about his fitness, he said: "Well, honestly, the first three months of the season were very hard, too many issues again.

"And then it's true that since Barcelona, things have been improving. I was able to fix a little bit the body and play more or less with freedom of movements.

"That's given me the chance to compete at the highest level again. And the most important thing, enjoy the sport. That's the main thing in this stage of my career more than anything else.

"I don't think a lot of events remain for me this year. Just a couple. This one is one of the ones that you want to be ready [for].

"So here I am to try my best and I'm going to put my 100 per cent to try to be ready for the next round."

Rafael Nadal cruised into the fourth round of the US Open with a routine 6-3 6-4 6-2 victory over Hyeon Chung at Flushing Meadows on Saturday.

Nadal was given the benefit of a walkover in the second round after the withdrawal of Thanasi Kokkinakis and, in truth, he was never really tested by Chung on Arthur Ashe.

The three-time champion was in complete control throughout, his win setting up a last-16 clash with Marin Cilic or John Isner.

Chung had come from two sets down to beat Nadal's compatriot Fernando Verdasco in the previous round, but there were never any signs of such heroics being repeated once Nadal forged ahead.

The South Korean qualifier produced only flashes of the brilliance that saw him reach the Australian Open semi-finals in 2018, and tougher tests are sure to await Nadal as he bids to regain the trophy he last won in 2017.

Nadal struck the opening blow in the sixth game of the match as Chung sent a cross-court backhand wide. 

Chung actually hit five aces to Nadal's four, but it was one off the Spaniard's racquet that wrapped up the first set.

A scintillating forehand down the line provided Nadal with what proved the decisive break in the second set and he did not have to wait long to make inroads in the third.

The third game of the set saw Chung drag a forehand off-target as he faded badly against the physical challenge presented by Nadal, the 23-year-old having only returned from injury at the end of July.

Asked about the potential benefit of a comfortable opening week in which he has only had to play two matches, Nadal told ESPN: "You never know, last year I had some tough matches and then in the semi-finals I had to retire [against Juan Martin Del Potro].

"You never know what's better. I have a tough opponent, John Isner or Marin Cilic [in the fourth round], I need to be ready for this, I can't think further than this."

Daniil Medvedev has been fined $9,000 for the unruly conduct in his US Open win over Feliciano Lopez that saw him booed by the crowd.

Medvedev was given a code violation in the first set on Friday after snatching a towel from a ball boy's hand. He responded by tossing his racket in the direction of the umpire's chair.

Unseen by the umpire, Medvedev then directed a middle-finger gesture at the crowd, with the fans inside Louis Armstrong Stadium incensed after seeing him do so on the big screen.

Medvedev was jeered throughout the contest and after he wrapped up a four-set victory in the third-round clash.

The 23-year-old Russian seemed to revel in the boos and told the crowd: "The more you do this, the more I will win."

He later told reporters his actions were brought on by the heat of the moment and said: "Hopefully I will do better next time."

Medvedev was fined $5,000 for unsportsmanlike conduct and $4,000 for a "visible obscenity", tournament officials said.

The world number five will look to put the episode behind him when he faces qualifier Dominik Koepfer on Sunday.

Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer remain on a collision course to meet in the US Open semi-finals after they each claimed straight-sets wins to reach the last 16.

Djokovic declared himself "almost pain-free" after coming through a decent test from Denis Kudla and sealing a meeting with Stan Wawrinka, the defending champion having faced questions about his troublesome left shoulder going into his 6-3 6-4 6-2 victory.

Federer has had no such fitness issues and breezed through against Daniel Evans, though the Swiss was forced to respond to suggestions he had influenced the decision to have him play first on Arthur Ashe against the Briton, who had come through a four-set encounter on Thursday.

Next for Federer is David Goffin after the Belgian overcame Pablo Carreno Busta in three sets.

Daniil Medvedev provided late drama in the last match on Louis Armstrong, with his victory over Feliciano Lopez booed by fans after he was seen to aim a middle finger at them.

 

MEDVEDEV WINS DESPITE MELTDOWN

World number five Medvedev needed three hours and 19 minutes to see off Lopez 7-6 (7-1) 4-6 7-6 (9-7) 6-4, the Russian progressing despite a first-set meltdown.

Medvedev lost all support from the crowd after he was seen to direct an insulting gesture at them, this after he had been assessed a code violation for snatching a towel from a ball boy, which he reacted to by tossing a racquet in the direction of the umpire's chair.

The Russian revelled in the boos that came after he clinched victory, seemingly enjoying playing the role of villain, telling the crowd their energy will be "enough for the next five matches".

He later described his actions as "heat of the moment" and expressed hope he will deal with such situations better next time. Whether he will have the crowd on side in his match with qualifier Dominik Koepfer, who is set to break into the top 100 after beating 17th seed Nikoloz Basilashvili in four sets, is debatable at best.

WAWRINKA EXPECTS TO BRING HIS BEST

Wawrinka has beaten Djokovic twice in grand slam finals, at the French Open and in New York, and anticipates producing his best tennis against the world number one in round four.

The Swiss saw off Paolo Lorenzi in three sets, a day after the Italian completed a second-round match that lasted nearly five hours.

Speaking in a media conference, Wawrinka said of his meeting with Djokovic: "There's something with him that when I get into my best game, I know that it's going to have some big rally, I'm going to play good tennis."

DEMON DE MINAUR SET FOR DIMITROV DUEL

Alex de Minaur claimed his first top-10 win as he shocked seventh seed Kei Nishikori 6-2 6-4 2-6 6-3. 

The Australian was afterwards asked if he had a nickname he likes and replied: "Demon. That's something that's sort of caught on in Australia. And, yeah, I don't mind it.

"I like to think it's got something to do with sort of my fiery attitude on court. Just, you know, I get pretty fired up and pumped up. I'd like to think it's something to do with that."

Grigor Dimitrov will be the next man faced with De Minaur's fire, after the Bulgarian saw off Kamil Majchrzak in three sets.

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