CWI partners with Horizm in bid to monetize social media popularity

By Sports Desk August 23, 2021

Cricket West Indies (CWI) has forged a new partnership with digital inventory management specialists, Horizm to value and unlock revenues from CWI’s website and social media channels.

Founded in 2019, the Horizm is revolutionizing the way rights holders operate in the new digital era and fully support them across their digital commercial lifecycles. The company provides a new, real-time solution to digital inventory management, leveraging artificial intelligence to help sports and entertainment better track, value and monetize their digital media.

Cricket West Indies boasts one of the fastest growing online and social media audiences in sport with the www.windiescricket.com website, over 4 million followers on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and over 2.5m subscribers on YouTube.

This growth is a result of the West Indies teams being one of the most successful, innovative and loved teams in world sport. Innovating the way that cricket has been played in every format of the game, the West Indies have one of the most impressive records in Test cricket, are the first-ever two-time winners of the ICC ODI World Cup, and are current two-time back to back ICC T20 World Champions.

Cricket West Indies will benefit from access to Horizm’s AI-powered, digital asset management platform, providing a real-time valuation of CWI’s social media, website and mobile activity and helping to understand how additional value in CWI’s content can be unlocked to generate new revenues.

 “The West Indies website and social channels have seen incredible growth in the last three years as fans across the Caribbean and around the world follow one of the most loved and followed teams in sports,” said Dominic Warne, CWI’s Commercial Director.

“As we have increased the quality and quantity of West Indies content, it has become a major source of value for our sponsors and potential new sponsors to reach and connect with West Indies and cricket fans. This new agreement with Horizm will help us better understand the value of our digital assets, create new commercial content opportunities and unlock untapped revenue potential.”

CWI will join a number of other high profile cricket organizations working with Horizm, including New Zealand Cricket, IPL side Delhi Capitals, the Caribbean Premier League, Yorkshire County Cricket Club and Middlesex Cricket.

“We are honoured to be working with Cricket West Indies with such a storied past and an exciting future,” said Head of Commerical at Horizm Sam Grimley.

“The skill and flair with which their teams play the game have won them many fans around the world and together we can help them capitalise on the digital potential of their fan base.

Horizm’s award-winning digital asset services are now used by more than 50 rights holders across eight different sports, most notably in football where they work with 30 clients including Chelsea, Real Madrid, Inter Milan and the Portuguese Football Federation.

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    A report by Katharine Newton KC published last December found reference to players’ ethnic, racial and religious origins was “entirely normalised and tolerated behaviour” within the dressing-room culture between the mid-1990s until around 2013, under the misguided belief that it was acceptable ‘banter’.

    Newton was commissioned to carry out the report in 2021 after allegations of discrimination were made by former Essex players Jahid Ahmed, Maurice Chambers and Zoheb Sharif.

    The club revealed on Wednesday that sanctions have now been issued, but have not confirmed who has been sanctioned, how many individuals are involved and what the nature of those sanctions are.

    Mohindru told the PA news agency: “I am not going to give a number because it’s about jigsaw identification.

    “Everyone who has been implicated and had an adverse finding in the report has been sanctioned in some way.

    “When the report came out we gave it to the independent panel, who then had nothing off the table for them at that stage. They could decide what was appropriate from bans, to losing membership to bans from the ground.

    “That was then sent back to the board and everybody had an opportunity to make representation with regards to mitigating circumstances or anything we thought the board should take into consideration.

    “The board then took the starting point that the panel had thought or the range, took mitigation into place and then we imposed the sanction.

    “Each person has been told individually. We haven’t told anybody what anybody else has got and so forth like that. And that’s keeping in line with the anonymity we wanted to keep throughout this.

    “It is not a matter of us trying to shut shop, but with regards to the Katharine report, we were very clear in our mind we needed to follow the anonymity that stemmed from the start.”

    Mohindru refused to reveal if any of the individuals sanctioned were still working for Essex, but said the England and Wales Cricket Board had been told about all those sanctioned and what those sanctions were.

    “I can’t tell you that because again, I can’t confirm or deny that. All I can say is anybody that has been in the report has been sanctioned and there has been an array of sanctions that have been put forward,” Mohindru said when questioned if any of the sanctioned individuals were still at Essex.

    “I absolutely understand (criticism) but I need to also keep an eye on people’s welfare and the process we’ve followed from the start. We had to follow legal advice, which we have done all the way through and I think we were in a catch 22.

    “If we had revealed it, I am sure we would have been criticised for that and by not revealing it, we’ll be criticised for that, but what I can say is it has been a very strong process.

    “The independent panel are an experienced panel that are used to dealing with regulatory as well as sanctions so they would know what would be appropriate. It is my day job as well so I know how to deal with it.

    “It is a matter of this board had nothing to do with anything that happened before and it is an independent board that was pretty much elected after all of this started, so we’ve tried to be as fair as possible all across the board in every way. That’s been robust sanctions as well as being fair to the individuals.”

    Newton said in her report conclusions that those on the receiving end of discriminatory treatment “were too scared to speak up for fear of damaging their prospects of selection and progression”.

    “In any event, there were no effective mechanisms for raising such concerns,” she added.

    Her report also found a lack of understanding of the needs of Muslim players at Essex.

    Newton also found that the club’s former chairman, John Faragher, used racist language during a board meeting in 2017 and that the club failed to properly investigate a complaint about the language used.

    Newton said in the summary report that she had upheld “a number” of complaints of racially discriminatory conduct, and that the perpetrators were named in the full report she sent to Essex.

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    Ahmed, who has been contacted for comment, has previously told PA the term “curry muncher” was directed towards him during his time at the club.

    The ECB has not commented on the sanctions. The Cricket Regulator is continuing its own investigation into what happened at Essex, but Mohindru is unsure when it will conclude.

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    The Bajan received good support from Yastika Bhatia with 26 and Amelia Kerr with 23.

    The Warriorz then needed only 16.3 overs to reach 163-3 and get their first win of the season.

    Openers Alyssa Healy and Kiran Navgire all but killed any chance of a Mumbai victory with a rapid opening partnership of 94 in just 9.1 overs.

    Navgire led the charge with a top score of 57 off 31 balls including six fours and four sixes. Healy was more measured in her approach, making a 29-ball 33 including five fours.

    The finishing touches were put on by Grace Harris and Deepti Sharma who made 38* and 27*, respectively.

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  • Essex not naming those sanctioned over independent review into racist abuse Essex not naming those sanctioned over independent review into racist abuse

    Essex are not naming the individuals they have sanctioned over an independent review which found players at the club had been subjected to racist abuse and discriminatory treatment.

    A report by Katharine Newton KC published last December found reference to players’ ethnic, racial and religious origins was “entirely normalised and tolerated behaviour” within the dressing-room culture between the mid-1990s until around 2013, under the misguided belief that it was acceptable ‘banter’.

    Newton was commissioned to carry out the report in 2021 after allegations of discrimination were made by former Essex players Jahid Ahmed, Maurice Chambers and Zoheb Sharif.

    The club say sanctions have now been issued, but have not confirmed who has been sanctioned, how many individuals are involved and what the nature of those sanctions are.

    “Essex County Cricket Club can confirm that sanctions have been imposed against the individuals implicated in Katharine Newton KC’s independent review into historic allegations of racism,” a club statement read.

    “Following the publication of Ms Newton’s report on December 8, 2023, the club commissioned an independent committee who recommended disciplinary measures.

    “While the individuals are not named to align with the anonymised report, Essex CCC takes allegations of racism extremely seriously and the measures are a further commitment to creating an inclusive and welcoming club for everyone.

    “Essex CCC have shared the measures with the England and Wales Cricket Board and reaffirms its pledge to promoting equality, diversity, and inclusion within cricket to prevent such incidents from occurring in the future.”

    Newton said in her report conclusions that those on the receiving end of discriminatory treatment “were too scared to speak up for fear of damaging their prospects of selection and progression”.

    “In any event, there were no effective mechanisms for raising such concerns,” she added.

    Her report also found a lack of understanding of the needs of Muslim players at Essex.

    Newton also found that the club’s former chairman, John Faragher, used racist language during a board meeting in 2017 and that the club failed to properly investigate a complaint about the language used.

    Newton said in the summary report that she had upheld “a number” of complaints of racially discriminatory conduct, and that the perpetrators were named in the full report she sent to Essex.

    Newton said one of the players was given the nickname ‘bomber’ following the September 11 terrorist attacks. She also found that the phrase ‘curry muncher’ was “commonly used” in the dressing room to describe individuals of South Asian heritage.

    Ahmed, who has been contacted for comment, has previously told PA the term “curry muncher” was directed towards him during his time at the club.

    The ECB has not commented on the sanctions. The Cricket Regulator is continuing its own investigation into what happened at Essex.

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