'Fit and ready' Briana Williams eyes new 200m personal best in Bermuda on Saturday

By April 08, 2022

Coming off her impressive 200m season opener at the Florida Relays on April 1, Tokyo Olympic gold medallist Briana Williams believes a new personal best for the half-lap sprint is a possibility when she takes on a strong field at the USATF/Bermuda Games on Saturday.

Williams, who ran a personal best of 7.04 at the World Indoor Championships in Belgrade in March, blazed to her best ever opener in the 200m, clocking a nippy 22.82 in Gainesville, signalling that good things could be in store for the 20-year-old Jamaican this season.

However, in Bermuda, both her speed and mettle will be tested when she lines up alongside world leader Jasmine Camacho-Quinn, USA's Dezerea Bryant and Twanisha Terry as well as Anthonique Strachan of The Bahamas.

Not one to be daunted by the opposition, Williams said she is eager to step into the blocks on Sunday with a new personal best in mind.

“I’m really thrilled to run my second 200m of the season in Bermuda, it’s my first time there,” she said. “The field is very strong and I’m looking forward to a new personal best, it’s time to update that number and run a very strong and fast race.”

Williams’ personal best of 22.50 was set in 2018 while winning the 200m and completing the sprint double at the World U20 Championships. She was just 16 years old.

Meanwhile, her coach Ato Boldon, who said his young star will be running more 200m races this year, thinks Sunday’s race will be a true test for the young Olympian but believes she is ready for the challenge.

“Briana getting a chance to run a high-quality 200m in April in Bermuda fits her overall plan,” he said. “A year ago, she was battling injuries. She’s fully fit and ready now."

*Editor's note: This story initially stated that the USATF/Bermuda Games would be held on Sunday. The Games will be held on Saturday. Sportsmax.TV apologizes for the error.

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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