Damion Thomas leads the world in 110mh, Sparkle McKnight takes 400mh crown at Texas Relays

By March 28, 2021

Damion Thomas and Sparkle McKnight were winners on Saturday’s final day of the 93rd Clyde Littlefield Texas Relays held at the Mike A. Myers Stadium in Austin, Texas.

Thomas, the NCAA National 60m hurdle champion after running a personal best and collegiate-leading 7.51, took his good form outdoors winning the 110m hurdles in a personal best and world-leading 13.22 seconds.

The LSU junior powered away from the field leaving South Dakota freshman Brithon Senior (13.54) and LSU sophomore Erica Edwards Jr (13.56) to battle for the other podium spots.

McKnight won the Women’s 400m hurdles invitational in a creditable 57.27 ahead of Melissa Gonzalez of Colombia who was more than a second behind in the runner-up spot having crossed the line in 58.69.

Alana Yukich, a senior at UTSA, was third in 58.78.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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