World 200m champion Shericka Jackson storms to a world-leading 10.82 100m victory at Velocity Fest 13

By Sports Desk April 23, 2023
Shericka Jackson opens her 100m account with a world-leading 10.82 at Velocity Fest 13. Shericka Jackson opens her 100m account with a world-leading 10.82 at Velocity Fest 13.

Shericka Jackson’s world-leading time in the 100m was the highlight of the Velocity Fest 13 meeting held at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday night.

The meet ended in controversy after Akeem Blake clearly false started in the men’s 100m final but the electronic timing system reportedly shut down and the race was not called back or re-run. Blake was subsequently disqualified and the race awarded to Zharnel Hughes in a hand time of 9.9. Kadrian Goldon and Julian Forte were second and third, respectively with both being awarded a time of 10.0.

The system worked fine for the women’s final minutes earlier as MVP’s Jackson, the 2022 World 200m gold medalist and at 21.45 the second fastest woman of all time over the half-sprint sprint, gave an indication that she will be hard to beat in the blue-ribbon sprint this year.

The 28-year-old star, who has a personal best of 10.71, ran a smart 10.82 (-0.1m/s) while still pulling away from Natasha Morrison, who was second in 11.09 while Anthonique Strachan of the Bahamas was third in 11.11.

Jackson had given fair-warning during the preliminary round that something special was coming when she sleep-walked 11.06 to win her heat at a canter. Morrison ran 11.08 to win her heat.

Briana Williams, who ran 11.34 while finishing second in Morrison’s heat, withdrew from the final citing “tightness” while Elaine Thompson-Herah, who had been listed as a starter for the event, was a no-show.

Jonielle Smith of MVP International won the ‘B’ in 11.35 during what was a close finish with Shockoria Wallace, who was awarded the same time. Krystal Sloley was third in a personal best 11.46.

Adrian Kerr ran a personal best 10.26 to win the Men’s ‘B’ final with Odaine McPherson of GC Foster College and MVP’s Michael Campbell finishing in his wake in 10.34 and 10.36, respectively.

Kuron Griffith of Barbados and the Racers Track Club won the ‘C’ final in a season-best 10.42. Mazinho Barrett of the University of the West Indies clocked a personal best 10.47 for second while McKish Compton of St Vincent and the Grenadines and GC Foster College was third in a season-best 10.48 in what was a close race.

World Championship bronze medallist Sada Williams was an impressive winner in the ‘A’ final of the Women’s 400m clocking 51.84 while finishing ahead of Janieve Russell, who ran a season-best time of 52.41. Tovea Jenkins ran 52.66 for third place.

The 'A' final of the Men's 400m offered up a thrilling finish between Jamaica's national record holder Rusheen McDonald and Zandrian Barnes. The two were on lock-step for the final few metres of the race that ended with Barnes falling across the line in a time of 45.41, the same time as McDonald. The two were separated by a mere 0.07s. Demish Gaye, back from a long-term injury was third in a season-best 46.07.

Tyler Mason ran his fastest time in almost a decade to equal his personal best of 13.32 defeating Commonwealth Games finalist Orlando Bennett who ran 13.47 for second place. Odario Phillips of Pelicans Track Club was third in 13.60.

The last time Mason ran as fast was in 2015.

There was a spectacular finish in the Women’s 100m hurdles in which newly minted professional Kerrica Diamond Hill ran a new meet record 12.75 for victory. Seemingly left for dead by Megan Tapper after the first five flights, Hill, who turned 18 in March, stormed back to blow past the Olympic bronze medallist and claim a comfortable victory.

Tapper had to settle for second in 12.99 while Asharria Ulett of St Catherine High finished third in 13.99.

Assinie Wilson of Titans International ran a new personal best of 49.15 to win the 400m hurdles ahead of training partner Malik Kymani James-King, who clocked 50.29 for second. Zachary Chamberlain finished third in a pedestrian 55.18.

Jodean Williams of Racers Track Club won the 200m in a season- best 23.56 over Olympic 400m finalist Candace McLeod, who ran 24.05 for second place. Tricha Walker of Camperdown High School was third in a new personal best of 25.16.

Tissanna Hickling of Ricketts Performance was the only woman past six metres in the long jump with a season-best 6.56m. Jodian Stewart of MVP jumped a season-best 5.91m while Aaliyah Foster of Mt Alvernia High set a mark of 5.89m for third.

Tajay Gayle won the men’s long jump that had sub-par performances from the podium finishers. Gayle jumped 7.90m to take the win ahead of Shawn ‘D Thompson (7.42m) and Aubrey Allen (7.39m).

Meanwhile, Fedrick Dacres won the men’s discus with a throw of 65.66m. Traves Smikle was second with 64.30m with Chad Wright third with a season-best of 63.35m.

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