Andrenette Knight went into Jamaica’s National Senior Athletics Championships on Thursday as the fastest Jamaican woman in the world over the 400m hurdles this year.

Janieve Russell entered this season short on confidence. Years of injury resulted in disappointing performances that saw her missing out on individual representation for the last seven years. That all changed on Friday night when she won the national title in the Women’s 400m hurdles at Jamaica’s National Senior Athletics Championships in Kingston.

Trailing Andrenette Knight, who is the fastest Jamaican woman in the world this year, with less than 100m to go, the 28-year-old Russell seized on the moment after Knight hit the ninth hurdle and fell. Russell stormed through to pass Shian Salmon and win in her fourth national title in a season-best 53.63. She said afterwards it was good to be back on top once more.

“It is really refreshing and it shows that you should never give up,” she said.

“Of course, I had some doubts coming into the season. I am saying to myself since 2015 I haven’t made a world championships team in an individual event I was a bit worried but I put in the work. I am confident and I am a lot stronger than last year and faster.

“I just went out there and execute and the execution wasn’t as perfect as my coach wanted it to but I was glad I was in the top three.”

The 2018 Commonwealth Games 400m hurdles champion said winning has boosted her confidence, especially in light of the fact that her injury issues are seemingly behind her.

“It has given me a lot of confidence,” she said of the victory.

“This is the first season I can remember that I haven’t had any major injuries. I did start the season with some little niggles but nothing that kept me out of training so I feel really good; words can’t explain but for the World Championships I am just going out there to represent.”

There is still work to be done if she is to improve over the next three weeks before the championships begin in Oregon on July 15.

“I believe I am really ready. When I go back to training we will look back at the video to see where I went wrong and see what I need to strengthen and what I need to change. I know there is a lot to change,” she said.

 

Natoya Goule is hopes to run a fast time when she takes to the track for the 800m final at Jamaica’s national senior championships at the National Stadium in Kingston on Sunday. However, she expects to unleash her best time for the World Championships in Eugene, Oregon next month.

The 31-year-old Goule, a finalist at the Tokyo Olympics in Japan in 2021, holds her country’s national record of 1:56.15 but has run a best time this season of 1:59.31 in Oslo on June 16. But even though she doesn’t expect to be challenged as she goes for a ninth consecutive title on Sunday, she expects to perform well.

“Now is a good time to target a time in a race like this where you control the race,” she said, “because sometimes you are in other races and you are not able to control the race like you want to so if I want to run a time I need to just go and do it.”

The national record holder also revealed that she has been working on a new race strategy that will result in her finishing on the podium in Oregon in July. In some races this season, she has run from the front while in others she has tried to run on from behind. So far this season, that has been a work in progress, she said.

“Well, in some of the races it was but for one particular race, it was not planned. It just happened. I think it was Rome, it was not planned. There was a lot going on at that time but it showed me I can still run from the back even though I wasn’t able to go as fast as I wanted at that time, it still showed that I can run from anywhere and I was able to dip under two minutes so that showed something but I was really trying to work on different strategies throughout the season in some races,” she explained.

“I just have to be ready on that day, be super fit and be able to execute my race properly and make sure I don’t overdo it and then I will be able to run faster.”

That said, she was non-committal about whether Jamaica would see elements of that developing strategy come Sunday but believes her best time is yet to come this season.

“My coach and I haven’t really spoken about my race plan as yet but we definitely want to run a good time so I think I will probably have to take it out,” she said.

“I am in the shape for that but let’s see what will happen because it is not easy running that by yourself. I think it is going to come between now and worlds because when I ran my PR it was in July. I always run my fastest in July so for me, July is the time.”

The 2022 World Championships begin on July 15.

 

Though pleased with her ‘workout' at the National Stadium in Kingston last Saturday, Derron Herah, coach and husband of Olympic champion, Elaine Thompson-Herah believes the next six weeks of preparation will be crucial.

 This is especially true if she is to realize her goal of winning her first World Championship title this summer.

The triple-gold medallist at last year’s Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan, ran a smart 10.94s to win the 100m dash running into a headwind of -1.8m/s and then less than an hour later clocked a decent 22.55 to complete the double.

“Her performance is good,” her proud husband told Sportsmax.TV after the 100m final where had there been no headwind, Thompson-Herah’s time would have been 10.81.

“Today (Saturday) was mainly a training run; didn’t know she was going to run this fast. She was not necessarily pressing the gas, just basically the first 30 and trying to maintain and maintaining brought her 10.94, so we are right there. We just need to lighten up because we’re still heavy. So when the time is right we will lighten up and then go when we need to go.”

Lightening up, as Herah puts it, involves getting Thompson-Herah to approach her peak at the National Championships from June 23-26 but be at her best at the 2022 World Championships that begin in Eugene, Oregon on July 15, just over two weeks later.

He explained that with the two championships so close to each other, everything comes down to timing.

“The timing is very important. After the National Championships, we have two weeks before World Championships, so we almost have to peak in the championships and maintain that into the World Championships. We have to be very careful and very and very selective with races and how we approach races,” he said of Thompson-Herah’s preparation.

“What we are trying to do is getting her to peak for Oregon, not necessarily the trials. We will have to be in some kind of shape to indicate what we are going to do in Oregon so we have to be on that cycle now, six-seven weeks out, so by the time trials come around then we would have to be in similar shape as to what we would be in Oregon.”

The delicate nature of this phase is partly why they decided against flying to Birmingham, England last week for the Diamond League meeting after Thompson-Herah suffered some discomfort during training.

Herah explained.

“Even our decision to not go to Birmingham, we had everything in mind because we knew what the weather was going to be like and she was feeling some type of soreness. It’s not like we would go and then not run,” he said.

“We decided on the day not to go and as the week went along she started to feel a little better so I decided we would come out here today (Saturday) because we would have had a training session today anyway, so we got in two competitive runs but what we saw today was good enough.”

Thompson-Herah is down to compete at the Prefontaine Classic Diamond League meeting in Eugene, Oregon on Saturday, May 28. She lines up against some of the fastest women in the world including Dina Asher-Smith, World 60m champion, Mujinga Kambundji, Olympic gold medallist Briana Williams, Shericka Jackson, Marie Jose Ta Lou and Twanisha Terry.

 

 

Following an impressive season-best run over 400m at the second JAAA/SDF Jubilee Saturday night, Tokyo Olympics bronze medallist Candice McLeod revealed that she has been working on a new race plan that she believes could make even faster than she was in 2021.

Inside the National Stadium in Kingston, the well-chiselled McLeod exploded at the 250m mark and pulled away from the field to win handsomely in 50.58. In her devastating wake were the Sprintec pair of Tiffany James and Ashley Williams, who ran 52.10 and 53.40 for second and third, respectively.

McLeod’s winning time was the third-fastest by a Jamaican woman behind Charokee Young (49.87) and Stacey-Ann Williams (50.21).

Surprisingly, she was pleased but not overly impressed with the performance.

 “I feel okay but I feel like I have a little more (to give). I feel like I was just working on what we have been working on in training,” she said following the victory.

The new race plan that she and coach Fitz Coleman has been putting together is intended to take her to the next level because despite running a massive personal best of 49.51 at the Olympics last summer, McLeod feels as if she needs to suffer to get the best out of her body.

“Honestly, even when I ran 49.5, I never felt like I gave it my all. I didn’t feel the leg pain, the headaches and whatever so I feel like I didn’t do enough,” she explained.

“I have always wanted to feel at my maximum regardless of what it feels like. I want to feel like I am dying so I felt like I needed to switch it up a bit to get that dying feeling. Today wasn’t bad, it still wasn’t there but it’s getting there.”

That plan has been coming together since the outdoor season began earlier this year when she opened with 51.78 at the MVP Velocity Fest meet in Kingston on April 2 before flying off to Bermuda where in extremely windy conditions on April 9, she clocked a solid 51.57. She was second in both races to the 2019 World Championship 400m bronze medallist Shericka Jackson.

The University of the West Indies accounting graduate followed up on April 23 with what was then a season-best 51.20 in Kingston.

However, just over a week ago, on May 13, the 25-year-old Olympic finalist ran her worst race of the season clocking 52.37 in a fifth place finish at the Doha Diamond League meeting. Despite the poor showing, McLeod said that race was important to her plans for this season even if things didn’t work out as planned.

“I needed Doha because after the 51.2 here, I needed to see if I could get it (the race plan) in play but, unfortunately, I didn’t do what I wanted to, so I came today even though it wasn’t part of the schedule to run,” she said while explaining what went wrong in Doha.

“It was the wind. It was bad execution by me too. Bad judgement of the wind and as for recovery, I am not too keen or known to recover well after travel but I am working on that. It takes time.”

She expressed confidence that most, if not everything, will fall into place by the time Jamaica’s National Championships roll around in late June when she believes a new lifetime best is probable as she heads into the World Championships in Oregon just over two weeks later.

“With practise comes improvement,” she said. “Everybody wants to be better than they were before so if I get that (below 49.51) then, wow. If I get 49.5, then wow again, but I am working towards just bettering myself,” said McLeod who is relishing the prospect of going up against the best that Jamaica has to offer, namely Young, Williams and defending national champion, Stephenie-Ann McPherson.

“I am very confident in my preparation, my conditioning and everything. I love competition. It’s all fun for me because I love what I do, so regardless, competition or not, I am here for it,” she said.

 

 

 

After running a massive personal best 60m time indoors and starting her outdoor season with a couple of 400m races, Tokyo Olympics 100m bronze medallist Shericka Jackson has confirmed that she is leaning towards the 100/200m double again this season.

Jackson, 27, a World Championships and Olympics 400m bronze medallist experienced a successful step down to the blue ribbon sprint last season, running personal bests of 10.76 and 21.81 in the 100m and 200m, respectively. The times, along with her 49.47 personal best in the 400m, have made her the second best active combination sprinter and fifth all-time.

Only Marita Koch, Marion Jones, Florence Griffith-Joyner, who no longer compete and Bahamian wonder girl Shaunae Miller-Uibo rank ahead of her.

Jackson missed out on a possible Olympic medal in the 200m in Tokyo last year when she mistimed her run during the preliminary round and failed to advance. However, she will have a second crack at a global 200m medal at the World Championships in Oregon this summer, should all go well at the National Championships in Kingston next month.

“I am definitely doubling this year,” Jackson said after running 11-flat in her first 100m final this season at the JAAA/SDF Jubilee meet last weekend. The time was run into a headwind of -1.8m/s, which makes her time about 10.87 without the influence of the wind.

“I think coach and I will lean more to the 1-2 than the 400 but we will see come trials.”

Jackson, who will be competing against a stacked 200m field that includes Tokyo Olympic bronze medallist Gabby Thomas and British star Dina Asher-Smith at the Doha Diamond League meeting on Friday, believes running a personal best indoors has helped her become a better sprinter.

“It has helped me good. I am coming from a 7.31 to a 7004, it was a really good accomplishment and I am healthy and I’m ready,” she said.

Several Jamaican Olympians will be on show this weekend at the next staging of the Velocity Fest Series at the National Stadium in Kingston.

Chief among them are the likes of Olympic medalists Hansle Parchment, Shericka Jackson and Stephenie-Ann McPherson.

Parchment, who is set to compete at the 2022 Drake Relays next week, will shake off some rust in the 110m hurdles where he will line up against rising star Rasheed Broadbell, Tyler Mason and Michael O’Hara, who is returning from an injury that ended derailed him last season.

Jackson, who has run a couple of 400m races this season, steps down to the half-lap sprint where she will match times with McPherson, who will also step down to the 200m for this meet along with fellow quarter-miler Tiffany James.

Also down for the 200m is the speedy Natasha Morrison, Anthonique Strachan and Sasha Lee Forbes.

2014 NCAA 100m champion Remona Burchell is in the line-up for the 100m along with long jumper Tissana Hickling, Kashieka Cameron as well as 2008 Olympic 400m hurdles gold medallist Melaine Walker.

The men’s 100m will feature Julian Forte, Tajay Gayle as well as Waseem Williams, Yohan Blake, Chadic Hinds and Antonio Watson.

The Women’s 400m event promises to be compelling as it should have Janieve Russell, Candice McLeod, Anastassia Le-Roy, James, Junelle Bromfield and the veteran Christine Day among the participants.

 

As the CARIFTA Games return for the first time since 2019, SportsMax, the Caribbean’s premier sports and entertainment broadcaster, will broadcast the games live on its channels and Mobile App.

Cancelled in 2020 and 2021 because of the Covid-19 pandemic, the CARIFTA Games first held in 1973, returns to the Caribbean sports landscape with the promise from the broadcaster that it will be bigger and better than ever. Jamaica will host the Games scheduled for April 16-18 at the National Stadium in Kingston and SportsMax Limited, the holder of the broadcast rights, plans to take the broadcast to a whole new level.

SportsMax will produce the CARIFTA Games and broadcast on linear TV via its many cable partners across the region and on CEEN TV outside the Caribbean and on its SportsMax and SportsMax+ channels within the SportsMax App in addition to partnering with several free-to-air entities across the region, ensuring that fans get to see their favourite athletes engage in pulsating track and field action over the Easter Weekend.

When the CARIFTA Games get underway, SportsMax, through its partnership with the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) and the North American, Central American and Caribbean Athletics Association (NACAC), will ensure that the action on the track and on the field will be seen live on CNC3 in Trinidad, CBC in Barbados, CVM TV in Jamaica and Winners TV in St Lucia.

SportsMax CEO, Nicolas Matthews has also assured that viewers are in for a unique experience.

 “SportsMax will bring its world-class expertise and team to deliver the highest level of production, bringing quality to viewers across the world like never seen before for CARIFTA. Our team of highly innovative, passionate and qualified professionals will ensure viewers get the best seat in the house. As the Caribbean’s leading broadcaster, we will showcase athletes on screen from across the region as they compete to see who is the Caribbean’s best.”

Matthews said the broadcast will be of the highest standard that will include elements that are sure to enhance the viewing experience.

“As the Home of Champions, we plan to give our audience the best viewing experience as never seen before for CARIFTA. We have prepared features highlighting athletes from the many competing countries. You can expect to view over 20 hours of live coverage with daily highlight packages. Our world-class production comes with our first-class commentary team including world-renowned Lance Whittaker, Ricardo Chambers and other expert analysts from around the region.”

“There will be interviews with past CARIFTA athletes, now greats, and other special guests.”

In addition to the live broadcast on SportsMax and the SportsMax app, viewers can find clips of the action on the SportsMax YouTube channel.

“We look forward to a great competition and SportsMax will ensure a true track and field broadcast, where CARIFTA gets the quality attention it deserves,” Matthews concluded.

 

 

Camperdown High School’s Roshawn Clarke smashed the championship record and exacted revenge on Kingston College’s Rayon Campbell in the finals of the 400m hurdles on Day 4 of the ISSA Boys and Girls Championships at the National Stadium in Kingston on Friday.

Clarke, beaten by Campbell at the recent Carifta trials exploded over the final 200m of the race to surge past Campbell and pulled away down the home stretch to win in 49.50, breaking the record set of 49.86 set by Jamaica College’s Javier Brown in 2021.

Campbell, who ran 49.52 to beat Clarke at the Carifta trials struggled over the final half of the race and was a distant second in 50.54 while his teammate Antonio Forbes took the bronze medal in 51.48.

Oneika McAnnuff of Hydel High School won the Girls’ Open equivalent in a personal best of 57.68 over Safhia Hinds of St. Jago High, who ran 59.33 for the silver medal. Tonyan Beckford of Edwin Allen was third in 1:00.07.

Daniel Wright of Excelsior High School won the Class II event in 52.83 ahead of Calabar High School’s Zacre Braham (53.31) and Kingston College’s Jordan Mowatt (53.70).

In action in the field, Michael-Andre Edwards of Jamaica College soared out to 6.55m to win the Class III long jump over Courtney Kinglock of Kingston College (6.18m) and Deandre Jennings of St Jago (5.94m).

In the Class IV high jump for girls, Hydel High School’s Zavien Bernard cleared 1.64m to win gold over her teammate Kaira Wright (1.55m) and St Jago High School’s Alexia Williams (1.50m).

Ahshareah Enoe of Edwin Allen won the Class I event with 1.76m over Malaika Cunningham of Wolmer’s Girls, who cleared the same height but lost on the countback. Chenessa Davis of Excelsior High School was third with a clearance of 1.65m.

Excelsior had better fortune in the Class II discus where Najhada Seymoure won gold with a mark of 45.14m. Shamoyea Morris of Edwin Allen won the silver medal with her best throw of 43.49 while Victoria Christie of Camperdown High was third having thrown 43.09m.

Jafar Moore of Kingston College won the Pole Vault Open event with a clearance of 4.00m. He won comfortably over Nicholai Blossom of Jamaica College who cleared 3.60m for the silver medal and Mark Phillips of Wolmer’s who cleared 3.40m.

Samantha Pryce of Holmwood Technical claimed gold in the 2000m steeplechase after crossing the finish line in 7:10.52 more than eight seconds ahead of Taiefa Gowe of Hydel High, who clocked 7:18.77 and Sushana Johnson of Edwin Allen High, who was third in 7:19.73.

The boys' race was won by Kingston College’s Gianni Henry (6:10.78) over Nellie Ambriton of Jamaica College (6:25.33) and Jalen Brown of St. Jago High (6:30.76).

Personal best performances were the order of the day during the finals of the 400m on day three of the 2022 ISSA GraceKennedy Boys and Girls Championships at the National Stadium in Kingston on Thursday night.

It ended with St Jago’s Gregory Prince running a lifetime best of 45.99 to win the Class I Boys event in dominating fashion over Deandre Watkin of Jamaica College (46.50) and Shemar Palmer of Manchester High (46.79).

Marcinho Rose of Kingston College won the Class II race in  48.03 for what appeared to be a Pyrrhic victory as he went down injured after crossing the finishing line ahead of teammate Tahj-Marques White (48.39) and Enrique Webster of  St. Elizabeth Technical who clocked 48.90 for the bronze medal.

Troydian Flemmings of Manchester High ran his heart out to win the Class III race in a personal best of 50.25. He was well clear of Samuel Creary of Jamaica College, who ran 51.06 for the silver medal. Demarco Bennett of Excelsior High was third in 51.12.

The girls’ races were just as thrilling as Dejanea Oakley of Clarendon College followed up her victory last year in Class II with a brand new personal best of 51.81 to win the title in her first year in Class I. Oneika McAnnuff Hydel High, the silver medalist in Class II once again won silver in 52.38. Kaylia Kelly of Vere  Technical (53.59) won the bronze medal.

Abigail Campbell of Ferncourt High pulled off a late run down the stretch to win the Class II 400m in a personal best 53.75 ahead of Natasha Fox of  Edwin Allen High (54.26) and Alliah Baker of Hydel High (54.44).

It was an all-rural school sweep of the 400m for the girls as Sabrina Dockery of Lacovia High won gold in the Class III event in 54.76. She finished ahead of the Holmwood Technical pair of Rosalee Gallimore Holmwood Technical and Abriana Wright, who ran 55.47 and 55.79, for second and third, respectively.

In the field, Zachary Campbell of Jamaica College won the Class II Boys shot put with a massive throw of 19.13m. He was more than two metres better than Rajay Hemmings of St Catherine High who put 16.74m. Calabar’s Matthew Clarke won the bronze medal with 15.63m.

 

     

 

 

 

 

It was billed as a clash between Hydel’s Brianna Lyston and the Clayton twins, Tia and Tina over 100m on Day 2 of the ISSA GraceKennedy Boys and Girls Championships at the National Stadium in Kingston and it lived up to expectations except for the fact that the hot favourite did not win.

Lyston, who came into the championships with a personal best 11.14 set at Central Champs last month, enhanced her tag as the favourite when she ran an easy 11.28 into a headwind of -1.6m/s. However, in the final, Lyston, who was sandwiched between the Claytons; Tia in lane four and Tina in lane six, got off to a good start but was unable to shake Tina, the World U20 champion, who then briefly relinquished the lead before fighting back to edge Lyston at the line.

With a headwind of -2.8m/s, Tina clocked 11.23 to Lyston’s 11.26. Tia was third in 11.47.

The fastest girls' race of the night happened in the Class II final where Hydel’s Kerrica Hill ran a fast 11.16 to equal Kevona Davis’ record and hold off her fast-finishing teammate Alana Reid who clocked a personal best of 11.22 for the silver medal.

Mount Alvernia’s Carleta Bernard was third in 11.44.

Edwin Allen’s Theianna-Lee Terrelonge recovered from a poor start to win the Class III sprint in 11.60 over St Jago’s Camoy Binger (11.73) and Shemonique Hazle of Hydel (11.75) while Wolmer’s Girls’ Natrece East copped the Class IV title in 11.81 ahead of Edwin Allen’s Moesha Gayle (12.03 and Excelsior High School’s Janella Williams 12.10.

Edwin Allen’s Bryan Levell was the favourite to win the Class I Boys’ 100m title and he delivered on his promise but only just.

In the race in which Kingston College’s medal contender Bouwahjgie Nkrumie stumbled at the start and almost fell, Levell maintained his composure to go on to win in 10.23 over Jeevan Newby of Kingston College (10.23) and Herbert Morrison’s De Andre Daley 10.33.

Nkrumie was sixth in 10.49.

The Class II race was an even closer affair as the pre-race favourite, Mark Anthony Miller of Jamaica College clocked 10.76 for the win, the same time as Wolmer’s Boys’ Gary Card. Jason Lewis of Edwin Allen won the bronze medal after finishing third in 10.84.

Herbert Morrison’s Tavaine Stewart was lost for words after he ran a personal best of 11.03 to win the Class III Boys 100m. He managed to edge Calabar High’s Nickecoy Bramwell (11.06) at the line. Ferncourt High School’s Ajae Brown (11.34) took the bronze.

Edwin Allen’s plans to sweep all classes in the 1500m were dashed when Jodyann Mitchell of Holmwood Technical took advantage of a mishap that affected the race leader Rushana Dwyer took take gold in 4:36.39.

Shone Walters of St Mary High ran 4:37.05 for the silver medal while Dwyer’s teammate Jessica McLean was third in 4:37.06. Dwyer finished fifth in 4:42.30.

However, the defending champions won gold in the Class II event as Rickeisha Simms ran away from the field to clock 4:41.85 over St Jago High School’s Misha-Jade Samuels, who clocked 4:47.45 to claim the silver medal. Finishing third was Cindy Rose of Holmwood Technical, who ran 4:47.86.

Kora Barnett of Edwin Allen took the gold medal in 4:44.30 over the Holmwood Technical pair of Andrene Peart of Holmwood Technical (4:45.30) and Jovi Rose (4:50.09).

Meanwhile, defending Boys’ champions Jamaica College enjoyed a 1-2 finish in the Class I 1500m in which Jvoughnn Blake took the gold in 3:56.78 over Handal Roban (3:57.09). Giovouni Henry of Kingston College was third in 4:01.51.

Yoshane Bowen of Maggotty High won the gold medal in the Class II 800m in 4:12.70 ahead of Brian Kiprop of Kingston College (4:13.94) and Gage Buggam of St. Elizabeth Technical (4:13.99).

Earlier in the day, Balvin Israel of St. Jago High School won the first gold medal of the 2022 championships with a leap of 7.33m. Mark Phillips of Wolmer’s Boys took the silver medal with a jump of 7.02m while Ricoy Hunter of St Elizabeth Technical finished third with 6.90m.

Camperdown High School’s Victoria Christie win the Class II Girls Shot Put with a mark of 14.59m. Nastassia Burrell of Hydel threw 13.99m to win the silver medal and Maja Henry of Immaculate Conception won bronze with 13.51m.

Kingston College’s Jaydon Hibbert won the long jump with an excellent effort of 7.87m. Uroy Ryan of Jamaica College won the silver medal with 7.75m while Demario Price of St Jago took the bronze with a jump of 7.28m.

Meanwhile, in the Class I Girls discus, St Jago High School’s Jamora Alves battled hard to take the gold medal with her best effort of 48.13, just four cm ahead of Damali Williams of Edwin Allen (48.09) and Britannie Johnson of Camperdown (46.54).

At the end of action on Wednesday, Edwin Allen leads the girls’ standings with 76 points after nine finals with Hydel close behind on 54 points. St Jago (48), Holmwood (35) and Immaculate Conception (24) make up the top five schools.

Title favourites Kingston College leads the boys’ standings with 68 points after eight finals. Defending champion Jamaica College are second with 51 points while St Jago High (28), St Elizabeth Technical (23) and Wolmer’s Boys (18) complete the top five.

 

 

 

 

Athletes competing in the 100m and sprint relays at the 2022 ISSA/GraceKennedy Boys and Girls Athletics Championships next month, will have extra incentive to win after the title sponsor’s CEO announced on Monday, that there will be a financial benefit for their respective victories.

Speaking at the launch of the championships at the National Stadium in Kingston, Don Wehby, GraceKennedy's CEO, announced the sweetener before an audience across multiple platforms.

 “The winner of each class of the 100m finals – seven winners in all - will receive an educational grant valued at J$100,000 (approximately US$600). We will also award each winners’ school a J$100,000 grant to invest in a school upliftment project, which is to be chosen by their Champs team.  Similarly, the winning teams for the 4x100m – seven classes total - and their school will also receive a J$100,000 grant,” the CEO said to applause.

The 111th staging of the championships will be held from April 5-9 and will see 69 Boys’ teams and 68 Girls’ teams from across the island participating in 88 events over the five days.

The finals will be spread across four days as the Inter-Secondary-School Sports Association (ISSA) moves to make all the days of the championships memorable. The opening day, April 5, will be all preliminary rounds of competition.

On Wednesday, April 6, there will be 17 finals including the blue-ribbon 100m finals for boys and girls. ISSA says the move to have the 100m finals on the second day of the championships is in keeping with international trends where the 100m is contested early in the competition.

On Thursday, April 7, fans will get to enjoy 13 finals including the 400m for boys and girls, while on Friday, April 8, 13 more finals involving field events and the 400m hurdles will unfold.

On the final day of the competition, April 9, the 43 finals will include battles in the 200m, 4x100m and 4x400m relays.

In 2022, GK’s sponsorship of Boys’ and Girls’ Champs, totals over J$88 million.

“We see this as a major investment in nation-building which underlies GK’s long-term commitment to Jamaica. It’s an investment in our youth, our schools, sports development, and our country,” Wehby said.

 

Rayon Campbell threw the gauntlet down to his rivals locally and regionally on Sunday when he ran a blistering 49.52 to win the U20 Boys, 400m hurdles at Jamaica’s Carifta Trials at the National Stadium in Kingston. By the looks of it, Jamaica will field a formidable duo in the event set for April 16-18 in Kingston as Roshawn Clarke of Camperdown High was close behind in a time of 49.85.

Campbell’s Kingston College schoolmate Antonio Forbes ran 50.48 for third place.

Jordan Mowatt, also of Kingston College, won the U17 final in 52.53 over Martin Princewell of Jamaica College, who stopped the clock at 53.01. Daniel Wright of Excelsior High School was third in 54.77.

The Girls U20 final was won by Safhia Hinds of St. Jago who ran 58.06. She was a comfortable winner over Hydel High School’s Oneika McAnnuff, who took second place in 59.35. Shackelia Green of St Elizabeth Technical High was third in 59.77.

Deandra Harris of Spot Valley won the U17 event in 61.78. She finished miles ahead of Edwin Allen High’s Kelly Ann Carr, who completed the race in 65.22, just ahead of St Jago’s Olivia St. John (65.30).

A goal from Joel Campbell in the 62nd minute gave Costa Rica a critical 1-0 victory over Jamaica at the National Stadium in Kingston on Wednesday night. The defeat effectively scuppers Jamaica’s chances of qualifying for the 2022 FIFA World Cup.

After a scoreless first half that saw Costa Rica GK Keylor Navas called into action several times, both teams dialled up more attacking postures in the second half.

In the 50th minute, Jamaica MF Devon Williams had an opportunity at the top of the box after a move down the right wing but sent his effort over Navas’ goal.

In the 61st minute, Jamaica’s stopper Andre Blake was given his turn to come through, with Kevin Stewart whistled for a penalty on Campbell. Veteran Costa Rica Celso Borges stepped up but was denied by Blake.

The celebrations on the Jamaica bench had barely concluded, however, when Campbell found the winner. Borges played a ball over the top to the 29-year-old attacker, and he took a touch with his left to move inside and beat Blake to his back post.

Jamaica manager Paul Hall modified his lineup in search of an equalizer, with one of the best chances coming in the 71st minute when Andre Gray narrowly missed a chance to apply a finishing touch to a cross toward the back post.

The Costa Rica win moves the Ticos within a point of the playoff position, pending later results.

When Costa Rica returns to action in the final window of qualification, it will host Canada, while Jamaica will be back in the National Stadium for a contest against El Salvador.

Football’s world governing body FIFA has fined Jamaica Football Federation (JMD$170,000) for a bottle-throwing incident that occurred during the World Cup qualifying match against the United States at the National Stadium in Kingston last month.

Near the end of the match that ended in a 1-1 draw, a plastic water bottle was thrown from the bleachers' seats near the running track. The incident was reported to the FIFA security officer on-site and the JFF was subsequently fined.

According to the FIFA ruling, “The Jamaica Football Federation is ordered to pay 1000 Swiss Francs for the inappropriate behaviour of its supporters in connection with the match Jamaica vs the USA played on 16 November 2021 in the scope of the Preliminary Competition for the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022™, CONCACAF Zone. The fine is to be paid within 30 days of notification of the present decision.”

The JFF appealed the decision but the appeal was deemed inadmissible. In its appeal, the JFF expressed regret at the incident while pointing to its constant appeal to fans through different means not to throw objects, as well as the limitations on the sale of refreshments inside the stadium.

In light of the fine, the JFF said it was once again reminding spectators that they must follow all outlined protocols once they are within the confines of the National Stadium on match day as another breach could threaten Jamaica's hopes of hosting international games in the future.

Page 1 of 2
© 2022 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.