The World Athletics Continental Tour Silver event, Racers Grand Prix will host its 2024 staging on Saturday, June 1 at the National Stadium.

Known globally as Jamaica’s foremost track and field meet credited with showcasing many of Jamaica’s most decorated athletes, Racers Grand Prix promises an exhilarating three-hour demonstration of athletic excellence.

As the well-supported meet returns to its pride and place on the sporting calendar for the second year post-pandemic, Racers Grand Prix CEO Devon Blake is prepared to raise the engagement for fans of the sport.

“As usual we will have a star-studded lineup of international and Jamaican athletes. A major focus for this year's meet will be our fan engagement activities. We are working on new ways for attendees to immerse themselves in the Grand Prix experience. We are proud to announce that for the first time this year, fans of track and field will be able to sign up online for free tickets to the meet,” Blake shared

 While deliberations continue to determine the meet lineup for 2024, Blake is keen to highlight the Racers Track Club members to watch at this year’s meet.

 “It's too early to have any confirmed athletes who are not part of Racers Track Club. However, we are expecting exemplary things from Oblique Seville (who leads the new generation of 100m athletes), Antonio Watson (Jamaica's first World Championship gold medallist in over 40 years), and Zharnel Hughes (British 100m and 200m record holder),” Blake added.

 Racers Grand Prix was conceived by Chairman Glen Mills and launched in 2016. Today it stands as a premier Track and Field Meet showcasing top talents from the Racers Track and Field Club, Jamaica and around the world. The event plays a pivotal role in developing Jamaica's athletics and the Racers Track and Field Club.

 Racer’s Grand Prix Organizing Committee Chairman, Glen Mills is particularly excited to facilitate the development of local talent at this year’s meet as a precursor to the Olympics.

“This is an Olympic year and the Racers Grand Prix offers our Jamaican athletes the perfect opportunity to measure themselves against the best in the world in front of their home fans and also assess their progress in preparation for the Olympics,” Glen Mills commented.

Zharnel Hughes dismissed any fears over the direction of UK Athletics just seven months before the Olympics.

The Great Britain sprinter, who won 100m bronze at the World Championships last year, believes the governing body has no choice but to battle on.

Technical director Stephen Maguire’s sudden departure in October – after a record-equalling medal haul of 10 at the World Championships – was followed by the announcement of a £3.7million loss in December.

But Hughes, who has been training at his base in Jamaica, remains focused on his own work ahead of the Paris Games.

“They have to get themselves sorted out because they have major championships coming up,” he said, with Paula Dunn in interim charge through the Olympics.

“I hope everything will be ironed out by the time the championships come around and everything will be running smoothly for the athletes to be in the best place mentally to give our best performances.

“I hope they get their stuff sorted out. I see it, I read it but I keep my head down and keep moving.

“It did surprise me (Maguire’s departure). We had just come out of Budapest and, shortly after, it happened. ‘OK, what happened there?’ I just left it alone, no-one said anything to me.

“I’m pretty sure they’re aware it doesn’t have much to do with me. It’s not like I’m writing the cheques or anything.”

The 28-year-old is focused on this year’s outdoor season after opting to skip the indoor competitions, including the World Indoor Championships in Glasgow in March.

 

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Last year he claimed his first individual world medal, finishing third in the 100m in Budapest having broken the 100m and 200m British records.

He ran 9.83 seconds in New York in June – smashing Linford Christie’s 30-year 100m mark – before running 19.73 seconds in the 200m in London a few weeks later.

Hughes had written down 9.83 seconds in his diary before running the time and has already scribbled his goals down for this year.

“I’ve written down my times and what I want to accomplish. I’ve even said I want to break the British record again,” he said, ahead of defending his 200m European title in Rome in June.

“I want to medal in the European Championships and Olympics and want to get to the Diamond League final and see what I can do.

“Plans have been written down long before any New Year resolutions. I wrote them down in the first week of training.”

Zharnel Hughes is an ambassador for Vita Coco, for updates and information on the partnership visit: www.vitacoco.co.uk

Kenny Bednarek and Zharnel Hughes locked in an intense battle over 200m at the Diamond League meeting in Brussels on Friday with the American edging the Briton to win in 19.79. The Glen Mills conditioned Hughes was not far behind in 19.82.

Close behind in third was Canada’s Andre DeGrasse who ran a season’s best 19.89 for third place. His Canadian teammate Aaron Brown also ran a season-best 19.98 for fourth place.

World 100m champion Noah Lyles remained on course for the sprint double after winning his semi-final heat in a fast 19.76s at the World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Thursday. Also through are Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes and Letsile Tebogo, the other medallists in the blue-ribbon sprint.

After initilally failing to progress with compatriot Rasheed Dwyer, Andrew Hudson was added to the medal event which will now see all nine lanes being occupied.

Lyles unleashed his superior speed and put distance between himself and Alexander Ogando of the Dominican Republic who clocked in at 20.22 to seal his spot in the final.

Meanwhile, Tebogo show-boated down the home stretch looking across at Kenneth Bednarek of the United States, who won the heat in 19.96, with the Botswanian close behind in 19.97.

The USA’s Erriyon Knighton is also in the final after winning his heat in 19.98 with Hughes close behind in 20.02. Four athletes from the heat advanced to the final as Canada’s Andre DeGrasse (20.10) and Liberia’s Joseph Fahnbulleh (20.21) took the spots for non-automatic qualifiers.

Hudson, who was fifth in his heat in 20.38, almost didn’t compete as the cart taking to the stadium collided with another and resulted in flying glass getting into his eye. As such, the officials felt it was only fair to give him a lane in the final.

Dwyer was sixth in the final heat in 20.49.

 

Andrew Hudson and Rasheed Dwyer of Jamaica both advanced to the semi-final round of the 200m during the opening session of Day 5 of the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary on Wednesday.

Hudson, the Jamaican champion, came home in second place in Heat 2 that was won by 100m champion Noah Lyles. The American who is favoured to win the sprint double, cruised through the finish line in an impressive-looking 20.05, barely breaking a sweat in sweltering conditions.

Hudson, meanwhile, who challenged Lyles over the first 150m, visibly backed off to take an automatic qualifying spot in 20.25. Ondřej Macik of the Czech Republic also advanced from the heat after finishing third in 20.40.

Dwyer also ran 20.40 for third place in Heat 5.

Towa Uzawa of Japan surged to the lead late to win the heat in 20.34 with the USA’s Courtney Lindsay close behind in 20.39.

Also through to the semi-final round are medal contenders, Letsile Tebogo of Botswana, Zharnel Hughes of Great Britain and Erriyon Knighton of the USA.

Tebogo, the 100m silver medalist, who is expected to challenge Lyles for the gold medal, was in complete command of Heat 3, striding to victory in an easy 20.22 while Knighton won Heat 6 in 20.17 over Canada’s Andre DeGrasse, who ran 20.28.

Hughes, the bronze medallist in the 100m, easily won the opening heat in 19.99, the fastest time heading into the semi-finals with Canada’s Aaron Brown a close second in 20.08.

Brown’s compatriot, Brendon Rodney won Heat 4 in a season’s best 20.14 as did the USA's Kenny Bednarek, who sped to a 20.01 clocking to win the final of the seven heats. Alexander Ogando of the Dominican Republic crossed in second place in a time of 20.14.

 

 

Great Britain’s speed king Zharnel Hughes admits Olympic heartbreak inspired him to his historic 100m bronze at the World Championships.

The 28-year-old clocked 9.88 seconds to finish third in Sunday’s night final – less than an hour after Katarina Johnson-Thompson won heptathlon gold in Budapest.

Hughes became the first British man to win an individual 100m sprint medal at the worlds in 20 years – since Darren Campbell’s bronze in 2003.

The USA’s Noah Lyles took the title in 9.83 seconds with Botswana’s Letsile Tebogo winning silver, just a thousandth of a second ahead of Hughes.

It marks Hughes’ comeback after he was disqualified for a false start in the Olympic 100m final.

He said: “The heartbreak I’ve been through from Tokyo was devastating. Last year, I missed out on the finals. I got knocked out in the semis. I told myself this time, ‘I’m not getting knocked out whatsoever. I’m going to give it my very best’.

“I got through that semis and I told myself in the warm-up, ‘believe Zharnel. You got this’.

“I kept it all in. I cried a lot but lessons were learnt and I dug deep. It’s been years of trying, years of lessons – I wouldn’t call it failure – years of lessons.

“Doubts were there. People probably didn’t believe in me as much but I just need to believe in myself. Over the years the speed has always been there but the mind wasn’t aligned properly. Now it’s instinct.

“This morning I wrote down, ‘get a medal’. I thought I won. Being in the race, it looks a lot closer but a medal is a medal.”

The European 200m champion went into the race as the fastest man in the world this year and was boosted after defending champion Fred Kerley crashed out in the semi final, along with Olympic champion Marcell Jacobs.

Hughes, ranked 12th in the world ahead of the championships, had qualified fourth fastest after running 9.93s in his semi.

Yet he had struggled with a slow start in the heat and semi and, despite the fastest reaction time in the final, still needed to recover in the last 50m to ensure he snatched a podium place in a tight race.

It caps a remarkable summer for the Anguilla-born star, who trains under Usain Bolt’s former coach Glen Mills, after he broke two long-standing British records.

In June, he shattered Linford Christie’s 30-year 100m record by running 9.83s in New York.

A month later in London, he broke John Regis’ 200m mark to post 19.73s. Hughes is now eyeing the 200m and 4x100m relay.

Eugene Amo-Dadzie, an accountant who is due back to work as a senior management accountant for property developer Berkeley Group on August 29, bowed out in the semi-final after running 10.03s – still quicker than Olympic champion Jacobs.

Reece Prescod ran 10.26s and also failed to qualify, ending his championships as the 25-year-old pulled out of the 4x100m relay squad last week.

In a stirring battle for the 100m gold medal at the end of day two of the 2023 World Athletics Championships on Sunday, the USA’s Noah Lyles emerged victorious in 9.83 but it was not close to the 9.65 that he had predicted.

In what was one of the closest finishes in years, the battle for the other two medals came down to mere milliseconds as Letsile Tebogo, Zharnel Hughes and Oblique Seville were each credited with the same time of 9.88. Tebogo’s time was a new national record for Botswana.

Seville lost the bronze medal by 0.003 seconds as Tebogo was timed in 9.873, Hughes in 9.874 and Seville 9.877.

Christian Coleman, the 2019 champion, was fourth in 9.92.

Jamaica’s Ryiem Forde, in his first global final, was eighth in 10.08.

Though disappointed with the outcome, Seville thought he did his best under the circumstances but admitted to crucial errors late in the race. “I think it was an excellent performance up to the last part of my race which wasn’t that good but as my coach always told me it’s milliseconds that separates us  and I think  that was what separated me from a bronze medal,” he said.

He explained further the mistakes he made in the race.

“Well, everyone was close at the line and I think I should have stayed with my technique a little bit more because I dipped very early, which actually cost me.”

Great Britain’s speed king Zharnel Hughes grabbed brilliant bronze to make history in the 100m final at the World Championships.

The 28-year-old clocked 9.88 seconds to finish third on Sunday night – less than an hour after Katarina Johnson-Thompson won heptathlon gold in Budapest.

Hughes becomes the first British man to win an individual 100m sprint medal at the worlds in 20 years – since Darren Campbell’s bronze in 2003.

The USA’s Noah Lyles took the title in 9.83 seconds with Botswana’s Letsile Tebogo winning silver just a thousandth of a second ahead of Hughes.

European 200m champion Hughes went into the race as the fastest man in the world this year and was boosted after defending champion Fred Kerley crashed out in the semi final, along with Olympic champion Marcell Jacobs.

Hughes, ranked 12th in the world ahead of the Championships, had qualified fourth fastest after running 9.93s in his semi.

Yet he had struggled with a slow start in the heat and semi and, despite the fastest reaction time in the final, still needed to recover in the last 50m to ensure he snatched a podium place in a tight race.

It caps a remarkable summer for the Anguilla-born star, who trains under Usain Bolt’s former coach Glen Mills, after he broke two long-standing British records.

In June, he shattered Linford Christie’s 30-year 100m record by running 9.83s in New York.

A month later in London, he broke John Regis’ 200m mark to post 19.73s.

Eugene Amo-Dadzie, an accountant who is due back to work as a senior management accountant for property developer Berkeley Group on August 29, bowed out in the semi-final after running 10.03s – still quicker than Olympic champion Marcell Jacobs.

Reece Prescod ran 10.26s and also failed to qualify, ending his Championships with the 25-year-old pulling out of the 4x100m relay squad last week.

Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes believes he is making Usain Bolt proud as he looks to follow in the superstar’s footsteps.

The 28-year-old is eyeing the 100m title ahead of the heats on the opening day the World Championships on Saturday.

He arrives in Budapest as the fastest man in the world this year, having smashed Linford Christie’s 30-year British record in June when clocking 9.83 seconds in New York.

A month later in London he broke John Regis’ national 200m mark when running 19.73secs.

The 100m crown is up for grabs in Sunday’s final in Budapest, with no sprinter dominating since Bolt retired in 2017.

Hughes joined the Racers Track Club at 16 to train with Bolt, who was at the peak of his powers, and under coach Glen Mills and feels he soon grabbed the Jamaican star’s attention.

The 200m European champion said: “It first happened when I ran against Bolt in New York in 2015. I finished second to him, we both went to the finish line together and that’s when I opened his eyes. He noticed I was pretty quick and he was like, ‘Who is this young boy?’

“Since then, I think he has always held me at high regard, but injuries came along and stuff came by that’s out of my control. But I’m pretty sure now he sees the performances and he’s proud of me.

“First, Usain didn’t even know who I was. I was just a 16-year-old who came from Anguilla, skinny, looking like a tooth pick.

“But I came there and trained hard because I looked across every day to see what they were doing, how was it they pushed on? I was inspired by being in the presence of Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake, Warren Weir.

“I came there running 10.4 on grass and by the end of the season, I was running 10.20 and then the following year I got down to 10.12. So just being amongst those guys pushed me a lot.

 

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“To be in the presence of greatness was just one of those surreal moments. I just needed to pinch myself a second to realise, ‘Hey, you’re actually here’, but I think I got a little star struck.”

Eugene Amo-Dadzie and Reece Prescod also start their 100m campaigns at the National Athletics Centre.

Defending champion Fred Kerley, Noah Lyles and Olympic champion Marcell Jacobs will all make claims for the podium and Hughes recognises the nature of the race.

“It’s open but I’m bringing my A-game,” he said. “That’s all I know. I’m focusing on myself. I’m not really focused on whoever else is there. I’ll see them at the starting line and we will race towards the finish and see who gets there first.

“I don’t have a prediction, but I want to win. That’s the only thing on my mind, just going out, getting through the rounds and once I’m in the final let it all out.

“It’s a bit tense (in the call room), you can feel the tension and people are just sipping water, looking at you and you hear little grumbles now and then.

“They try to intimidate you, but my head is a bit hard to get into right now. So you can do whatever you have to do, but you’re not going to get into my head.

“I just go there. I sip my water. I look at who I need to look at, put my spikes on and I’m ready to race.”

Katarina Johnson-Thompson also competes on day one of the heptathlon, with Jazmin Sawyers going in long jump qualification, while Josh Kerr, Neil Gourley and Elliot Giles run in the 1500m heats.

Great Britain’s medal prospects are in the final countdown to the World Championships in Budapest, which starts on Saturday.

They won seven medals but just one gold – Jake Wightman’s shock 1500m triumph – at last year’s rearranged edition in Eugene and will be looking to improve on that tally.

Here, the PA news agency looks at some of those who will be challenging for the podium in Hungary.

Hughes looking to make mark

 

Zharnel Hughes won the 100m and 200m at the British Championships (Martin Rickett/PA)

 

The fastest man in the world this year, Hughes is in the form of his life. He broke Linford Christie’s 30-year 100m record by running 9.83 seconds in New York in June.

Just a month later he broke John Regis’ 200m record – clocking 19.73 seconds – at the London Diamond League. His sights are now set on a first individual world medal, having claimed 200m European gold last year after 2018’s 100m European victory.

The 100m and 200m fields remain open. Defending 200m champion Noah Lyles and 100m holder Fred Kerley, along with Trayvon Bromell and Erriyon Knighton, will all fancy their chances, but Hughes can challenge.

Muir aims to bounce back

 

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The Scot – named Great Britain’s captain on Tuesday – suffered a shock defeat in the 1500m at the British Championships last month when she finished second to Katie Snowden.

 

Muir, who has won Olympic and World silver, split with long-term coach Andy Young earlier this year and has been coached by Steve Vernon in the build up to Budapest.

She was clearly upset after defeat in Manchester but has the experience and composure to recover and reach the podium this month having said she is now competing happy.

Daryll v Dina

Great Britain have a duo who, although they downplay their rivalry, can create some serious headlines.

Daryll Neita has beaten Dina Asher-Smith – the 2019 world champion – over 200m this year as she gets to grips with the event, while Asher-Smith remains one of the world’s best.

Neita’s decision to move to Italy under coach Marco Airale has paid off handsomely and she can now rival Asher-Smith to become number one.

Hodgkinson’s battle

The 21-year-old’s contest with Athing Mu and Mary Moraa for the 800m title could be one of the races of the Championships.

The United States’ Mu beat Hodgkinson to gold at the Olympics and last year’s Worlds, while Kenyan Moraa got the better of her in the Diamond League last month. Yet, this month, Mu’s coach admitted she had not committed to running in Hungary.

Hodgkinson, though, keeps improving and, having narrowed the gap on Mu last year, will be confident she can beat her this time around – if the American competes.

Johnson-Thompson eyeing her biggest comeback

The 2019 world heptathlon champion has had little luck since that glorious evening in Doha.

Covid postponed the 2020 Olympics just when she looked set to challenge Nafi Thiam for gold before an Achilles rupture later that year. She battled back to reach Tokyo, only for a calf injury to wreck her dreams in Japan but she did defend her Commonwealth title last year.

With defending champion Thiam out and Johnson-Thompson fit and ready, the podium is well within reach.

World Athletics president Lord Sebastian Coe believes “real deal” Keely Hodgkinson and sprint star Zharnel Hughes are Great Britain’s best bets for World Championship glory.

Hodgkinson missed out on the world 800 metres title by just 0.08 seconds to American Athing Mu last year and also finished second behind the same athlete at the Toyko Olympics in 2021.

The 21-year-old has been in excellent form this season, setting a world best indoors over 600m in January and defending her European indoor title before beginning her outdoor season by lowering her British record in Paris.

Hughes has enjoyed arguably even better preparation for Budapest, the Anguilla-born star breaking the 30-year-old British records of Linford Christie and John Regis over 100 and 200m respectively in the space of a month.

His 100m time of 9.83 seconds, recorded in New York in June, remains the fastest in the world this year.

Asked if Hughes’s performances had earned the respect of the top sprinting nations and could lead to gold in Budapest, Coe said: “Yes and yes.

“I can give you the feedback from the cradle of sprinting and the NACAC congress in Costa Rica last month.

“People whose judgement I really value, both in Jamaican sprinting and US sprinting, think he can win in Budapest simply because it may not be that fast a race anyway. Their judgement is that he is absolutely a contender.

“The more people coming on the scene and fighting their way into the upper echelons of the sport is terrific and for British sprinting it’s not just a good thing, it’s an important thing.

“And those were good records; John Regis’s 200m record was one for the ages when he set it.”

Hodgkinson has tasted just one defeat over 800m so far in 2023, finishing second behind Kenya’s Mary Moraa, the Commonwealth champion, in Lausanne.

“I think she’s the real deal, I’ve thought that for some time,” added Coe, who also feels Dina Asher-Smith and Katarina Johnson-Thompson will challenge for medals in Budapest.

“At the age of 19 winning a silver in a world championships, similar type of performance at an Olympic Games, she’s outstanding. She’s coached well, she’s grounded and she’s talented.

“She is at this moment in great shape and this is where we’re beginning to see some strength in depth with Jemma Reekie running 1:57 in London. We’ve got depth now and genuine quality and this is encouraging.”

Coe reiterated that no Russian or Belarusian athletes would be competing in Budapest following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, a stance that World Athletics is set to maintain for next year’s Olympic Games.

“We’ve taken the view they won’t be in Paris,” Coe said. “We made the decision that we felt was in the best interests of the sport.

“Decisions we’ve made in the past have been tough ones, whether it’s around preserving the female category, transfers of allegiance, the initial suspension of Russia back in 2015 – we’ve done it because it’s been the right thing to do.

“If it has given other sports permission or comfort to feel that they can do the same then that’s a good thing but it’s entirely up to them – we didn’t do it for that reason.

“The nature of these decisions is that the world does change. We are also creating working groups to monitor the situation so we aren’t closing the door forever.

“We’re not the ‘computer says no’ federation and we’ve always, if we could, found the navigable route through.”

Not since Paris in 2003 has the men’s 100m title been claimed by a sprinter from outside the US or Jamaica. Could 2023 in Budapest be the time and place for someone to follow in the footsteps of Kim Collins by bringing an end to the 20-year-old duopoly?

The event appears to be as open as it was in the French capital two decades ago, when Collins put St Kitts and Nevis on the global track and field map. No-one stands out as a clear favourite, though Fred Kerley perhaps ought to be considered the main contender.

The 6ft 3in Texan is the reigning champion, having led a US medal sweep on home soil in Oregon last year ahead of Marvin Bracy-Williams and Trayvon Bromell. US sprinters have won the last three golds and Kerley will lead the starred and striped challenge in Budapest, supported this time by Cravont Charleston, the 2019 world champion Christian Coleman and two-time world 200m champion Noah Lyles, a potential ‘surprise’ packet.

Kerley has contested just five 100m races this season, two of them in the Seiko Golden Grand Prix in Yokohama in May, where he clocked a season’s best of 9.88. He registered comfortable victories on the Diamond League circuit in Rabat and Florence, both in 9.94, but was edged out in a tight finish in Silesia on 16 July, South Africa’s Akani Simbine taking the win in 9.97 with Kerley and Cameroon’s Emmanuel Eseme clocking 9.98 in second and third, and the newly-crowned US champion Charleston fourth in 9.99.

Ahead of Kerley on the 2023 world list stand two potential challengers in Britain’s Zharnel Hughes (9.83) and Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala (9.84).

When Hughes, a qualified pilot, flew to his 9.83 clocking in New York on 24 June, he sliced 0.04 off the ancient national record held by the only British sprinter to have claimed the world 100m title, Linford Christie, who triumphed in Stuttgart 30 years ago. Should he strike gold in Budapest, the native Anguillan would make it five wins in the event for his Jamaican coach, Glen Mills, the sprint guru who guided Usain Bolt to victory in 2009, 2013 and 2015, and also Yohan Blake in 2011.

“Obviously people are going to target the time I’ve run,” said Hughes, who won the European 200m title last year, “but I don’t put pressure on myself. That’s when things can go topsy turvy.”

Hughes, who false started in the Olympic final two years ago, has no other official sub-10 to his name in 2023, although he won the British title in 10.03 in monsoon conditions and smashed John Regis’ 30-year-old national 200m record with 19.73 for third place behind Lyles (19.47) and Botswana’s Letsile Tebogo (19.50) in the London Diamond League meeting on 23 July.

Omanyala is the only man who has dipped under 9.90 twice this year, the Commonwealth champion backing up his 9.84 from the Kip Keino Classic in May with 9.85 in the Kenyan trials on 8 July. The former rugby player has yet to make a global 100m final but has been a consistent performer on the Diamond League stage, placing third in Rabat, second in Florence and Paris and first in Monaco, and is not lacking in confidence.

Simbine’s victory ahead of Kerley in Silesia will have raised his hopes of finally making a global podium – and winning the race to become Africa’s first medal winner in the event. The 29-year-old South African has long been the ‘nearly’ man of the 100m: fifth in London in 2017, fourth in Doha in 2019 and fifth in Oregon last year, as well as fourth and fifth in the last two Olympic finals. With four successive wins behind him (in Kladno, Ostrava, Stockholm and Silesia), he heads to Hungary with serious momentum.

The African challenge promises to be fierce. Like Simbine and Omanyala, Eseme and Tebogo have also notched top three finishes on the Diamond League circuit, while Simbine’s South African teammate Shaun Maswanganyi has a 9.91 clocking to his name.

A place on the podium might not be beyond the scope of all four US sprinters – including Lyles, who beat Omanyala and Tebogo to win the 100m at the Paris Diamond League and was recovering from Covid when he took third place in the US Championships. He boasts a PB of 9.86.

A new kid on the senior international block, the 20-year-old Bahamian Terrence Jones who won the NCAA indoor 60m title in March, has run 9.91.

The Jamaican challenge will be led by Oblique Seville, who finished fourth in Oregon last year, and the emerging Rohan Watson, who started the year with a best of 10.41 but won the Jamaican title in 9.91. Ackeem Blake stands fourth on the world list with 9.89 but, having placed fourth in the trials, is on the entry list as a reserve.

Zharnel Hughes had a premonition he would blitz the British 200m record in the specific time of 19.73 seconds ahead of doing so at Sunday’s sold-out London Diamond League meet.

The 28-year-old warmed up for next month’s World Championships in Budapest by impressively shaving 0.21 seconds off the previous national mark of 19.94, set by John Regis in 1993.

Hughes revealed post-race that he had earlier written his precise finishing time, which was only good enough for third place behind Noah Lyles and Letsile Tebogo, in a notebook.

His latest feat was witnessed by around 50,000 spectators at London Stadium and comes just a month after he broke Linford Christie’s 30-year-old 100m record when he ran 9.83 seconds in New York.

“It’s the exact time,” he said. “If you want to come around here, you can check it out.

“It depends how I am feeling and, if I know I am in good shape, I just write down a time and I use that time as a target.

“I don’t care about winning as long as I execute the plan that my coach wanted and we get the British record. I wanted to do it here on home soil and I did it.”

Hughes previously ran 19.77 with an illegal wind speed to claim the UK 200m title in Manchester earlier this month.

He burst out of the blocks on Sunday and pushed American world champion Lyles hard before his rival and Tebogo of Botswana moved clear on the home straight.

Hughes credited a “Kobe Bryant mentality” for his impressive recent results and warned he can become “much faster”.

“I’ve seen some little bits I can work on – and it’s exciting for me,” he said.

“I’m not pressured one bit. I am enjoying myself. I can get much faster.

“I spoke to you about that Kobe Bryant mentality. For me, I just wanted to go there and give it a great performance.”

Hughes broke away from his post-race interview to watch compatriot Dina Asher-Smith finish second in the women’s 100m, before Britain’s Jemma Reekie capped a stirring end to Sunday’s action by clinching 800m glory.

Former 200m world champion Asher-Smith crossed the line in 10.85 seconds, 0.10sec behind Marie-Josee Ta Lou of Ivory Coast, while compatriot Daryll Neita finished fourth.

“I am always disappointed not to win but this shows I am building,” said Asher-Smith.

“It is all about the end of August and Budapest, which isn’t a long way away, so I am excited.

“I managed to see the end of the men’s 200m and I am so pleased for Zharnel. British sprinting is doing so well.”

Zharnel Hughes warned he can “get much faster” after blitzing the British 200m record in front of a sold-out London Diamond League crowd.

The 28-year-old warmed up for next month’s World Championships in Budapest by shaving 0.21 seconds off the previous national mark of 19.94, set by John Regis in 1993.

His latest feat was witnessed by around 50,000 spectators at London Stadium and comes just a month after he broke Linford Christie’s 30-year-old 100m record when he ran 9.83 seconds in New York.

Yet the phenomenal time was only good enough for third place on the day as world champion Noah Lyles and Letsile Tebogo of Botswana claimed the top two podium spots.

“I wanted to do it here on home soil and I did it,” Hughes said of the record.

“I don’t care about winning as long as I execute the plan that my coach wanted and we get the British record.

“I’ve seen some little bits I can work on – and it’s exciting for me. I’m not pressured one bit. I am enjoying myself. I can get much faster.”

Hughes previously ran 19.77 with an illegal wind speed to claim the UK 200m title in Manchester earlier this month.

He burst out of the blocks on Sunday and pushed Lyles hard before his rival moved clear on the home straight.

Hughes forecasted his time in a notebook and credited a “Kobe Bryant mentality” for his impressive recent results.

“It’s the exact time,” he said. “If you want to come around here, you can check it out.

“It depends how I am feeling and, if I know I am in good shape, I just write down a time and I use that time as a target.

“I spoke to you about that Kobe Bryant mentality. For me, I just wanted to go there and give it a great performance.”

Hughes broke away from his post-race interview to watch compatriot Dina Asher-Smith finish second in the women’s 100m, before Britain’s Jemma Reekie capped a stirring end to Sunday’s meet by clinching 800m glory.

Former 200m world champion Asher-Smith crossed the line in 10.85 seconds, 0.10sec behind Marie-Josee Ta Lou of Ivory Coast, while compatriot Daryll Neita finished fourth.

“I am always disappointed not to win but this shows I am building,” said Asher-Smith.

“It is all about the end of August and Budapest, which isn’t a long way away, so I am excited.

“I managed to see the end of the men’s 200m and I am so pleased for Zharnel.

“British sprinting is doing so well.”

Zharnel Hughes smashed the 30-year-old British 200m record by clocking 19.73 seconds in front of a sell-out crowd at the London Diamond League.

The 28-year-old shaved 0.21 seconds off the previous mark of 19.94, set by John Regis at the World Championships in 1993, in finishing third at London Stadium.

His latest feat was witnessed by around 50,000 spectators and comes just a month after he broke Linford Christie’s 100m record when he ran 9.83 seconds in New York.

American world 200m champion Noah Lyles, who on Saturday backed Hughes for the British record, triumphed in 19.47 secs, while Letsile Tebogo of Botswana was second in 19.50 secs.

Hughes claimed he had earlier forecasted his record-breaking time.

“I did it again – I predicted it,” he said. “I wrote down that exact time this morning, at about 9.30am.

“I wanted to get the British record here on home soil and I did it.

“I don’t care about winning as long as I execute the time that my coach wanted and get the British record.”

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