Watson becomes second Jamaican man to win 400m gold at World Championships; Hudson-Smith, Hall take silver and bronze, respectively

By August 24, 2023
Watson becomes second Jamaican man to win 400m gold at World Championships; Hudson-Smith, Hall take silver and bronze, respectively Loop News/Marlon Reid

Antonio Watson produced a spirited run to claim his maiden World title in the men’s 400m final at the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Thursday.

The 21-year-old, who produced a massive personal best 44.14 in the semi-finals on Tuesday, ran a measured first 300m before producing a magnificent final 100m to blaze past Great Britain’s Matthew Hudson-Smith who was second in 44.31. American Quincy Hall ran a personal best 44.37 to take bronze.

2011 World Champion Kirani James ran 44.52 for fifth while Sean Bailey ran 44.96 for sixth.

Watson’s gold medal is the second in the World Championships by a Jamaican with the first coming 40 years ago when Bert Cameron took gold in Helsinki.

Bradley Jacks

Bradley Jacks is a budding journalist and an avid sports fan. His love of research and sports has led him to SportsMax.tv, a place where those passions work hand in hand to allow him to produce content.

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