World number seven Alexander Zverev is still unsure if he will play the US Open.

The grand slam is scheduled to start on August 31 amid the coronavirus pandemic, but uncertainty remains over the strength of the field due to health concerns.

Zverev, coming off three wins at the Ultimate Tennis Showdown, is unsure if he will make the trip to New York.

"I will see because the situation right now in the US is not that great so I don't know what we will decide with my team," the German told Tennis Majors.

"I want to play tournaments, but I think the US right now is a little bit of a funny place."

The United States has seen more than 4.8 million confirmed cases of coronavirus, with the death toll exceeding 158,000.

Zverev, 23, said he would wait and see before making a decision on the US Open.

"I think just see how it develops over the next few weeks, if the cases go up, how the travelling will be and if it will be safe," he said.

"I might not to go there if I don't feel safe, my team doesn't feel safe. I'm still quite young but everybody that is involved with me maybe is a little bit older and they're in more danger than I am."

Nick Kyrgios took a swipe at Borna Coric after the Croatian said he does not care about the Australian's criticism of Novak Djokovic's Adria Tour.

World number one Djokovic, Coric, Grigor Dimitrov and Viktor Troicki all tested positive for coronavirus at the exhibition event as social-distancing guidelines were ignored.

Alexander Zverev, who also featured, came under fire after he was apparently spotted partying despite saying he would quarantine for two weeks.

The outspoken Kyrgios criticised those who played at the event and branded Zverev "selfish".

Coric responded, telling Croatia's Jutarnji List newspaper: "I read what he wrote, but I simply don't care because he likes to be a general after a battle.

"If someone else was teaching lessons I would have understood, but Kyrgios...it's somehow not realistic.

"I agree that was not good, Zverev acted badly but I don't see the need to criticise fellow players in such a way. I wouldn't do it, but again, it's Kyrgios."

Kyrgios slammed the comments and said Coric's "intellectual level" is zero.

"You should care. Do you have rocks in your head?" Kyrgios, who added a donut emoji at the end of his post, wrote on Twitter.

"Again, you can stand up for your mates, I'm just trying to hold them accountable. When I said what I said, I didn't intend to bother.

"They are tennis players, they aren't special. Just as I thought, Coric intellectual level = 0."

Nick Kyrgios has hit back at Boris Becker after the German legend branded him a "rat" over his public criticism of Alexander Zverev.

World number seven Zverev was labelled as "selfish" by Kyrgios after he was apparently spotted partying despite vowing to self-isolate.

Zverev took part in the Adria Tour where several players, including world number one Novak Djokovic, tested positive for coronavirus and, although he returned a negative result himself, promised to isolate, with guidelines recommending 14 days.

Becker, a winner of six grand slams, called out Kyrgios' public criticism, leading to the duo exchanging a few virtual volleys on Twitter.

"We all live in the pandemic called #Covid_19 ! It's terrible and it killed to many lives...we should protect our families/loved ones and follow the guidelines but still don't like #rats @NickKyrgios," Becker wrote on Twitter.

Kyrgios defended himself, writing: "Rats? For holding someone accountable? Strange way to think of it champion, I'm just looking out for people. WHEN my family and families all over the world have respectfully done the right thing. And you have a goose waving his arms around, imma say something."

The argument was not done there, though, with Becker once again repeating his earlier insult.

"Don't like no #rats ! Anybody telling off fellow sportsman/woman is no friend of mine! Look yourself in the mirror and think your better than us...@NickKyrgios."

To which Kyrgios responded: "For goodness sake Boris, I'm not competing or trying to throw anyone under the bus. It's a global pandemic and if someone is as idiotic as Alex to do what he has done, I'll call him out for it. Simple."

The back-and-forth exchange did not end there, with Kyrgios saying Becker is a "bigger doughnut than I thought" and he "can hit a volley, obviously not the sharpest tool in the shed though".

Becker continued the argument, with the retort: "Your [sic] funny guy ....how is it down under? Respect all the guidelines?" before somewhat bizarrely attempting to change tact.

"I really would like to see @NickKyrgios fulfil his potential and win a grand slam! He would be an incredible role model for the youth of the world addressing the issues of equality/race/heritage! Man up buddy and deliver!" Becker commented.

Kyrgios, though, was in little mood to change the topic of discussion.

"Why are you now talking about tennis? It has nothing to do with tennis? How about the dude who you are defending mans up and gives us some sort of explanation? Not another average management apology," he wrote.

Nick Kyrgios hit out at Alexander Zverev for being "selfish" after apparently being spotted partying despite vowing to self-isolate.

Zverev, the world number seven, played at the Adria Tour, where Novak Djokovic was among several players to test positive for coronavirus, as social-distancing guidelines were ignored earlier this month.

In a statement released on Twitter on June 22, Zverev said he tested negative for COVID-19 but would follow self-isolation rules, with 14 days usually recommended.

But the German was reportedly spotted partying and Kyrgios blasted the 23-year-old.

"So I wake up and I see more controversial things happening all over the world," Kyrgios said in an Instagram video.

"But one just stuck out for me was seeing 'Sascha' Zverev again, man, again, again, how selfish can you be? How selfish can you be?

"I mean if you have the audacity to f****** put out a tweet that you made your management write on your behalf saying you're going to self-isolate for 14 days and apologising to the f****** general public for putting their health at risk, at least have the audacity to stay inside for 14 days, my God.

"Have your girlfriend with you for f****** 14 days, Jesus man. Pissing me off, this tennis world is pissing me off, seriously, how selfish can you all get?"

The ATP Tour season is scheduled to restart in August, having been suspended in March due to COVID-19.

There have been more than 10.2 million confirmed cases of coronavirus worldwide, with the death toll exceeding 504,000.

Novak Djokovic won both of his matches and booked a place in the final as the second leg of his Adria Tour got under way in Zadar, Croatia.

The Australian Open champion, who has organised the series of exhibition events, recorded victories over Pedja Krstin and Borna Coric on Saturday.

Last week in Belgrade, a costly defeat to Filip Krajinovic meant Djokovic missed out on a place in the showpiece.

Instead, Dominic Thiem was crowned champion after a final win over Krajinovic.

This time, though, Djokovic will be in the final having won both of his encounters in straight sets on day one.

In his opening match, Djokovic fell a break down and saved three set points before winning a tie-break against Krstin, ultimately claiming a 4-3 (7-3) 4-1 victory.

A comfortable 4-1 4-3 (7-1) triumph over Coric followed as he recovered from a brief mid-match blip when he fell two games behind early in the second set.

Russian Andrey Rublev was another player to earn a 100 per cent record thanks to wins over Marin Cilic and Danilo Petrovic.

Alexander Zverev lost two tie-breaks as he suffered a defeat to Petrovic in his first match, before bouncing back with a victory over Cilic in the last contest of the day, winning a decisive final-set breaker.

On Sunday, the last round of group-stage matches in the day session will be followed by the final in the evening.

Grigor Dimitrov, who was in Djokovic's group, withdrew after losing to Coric in the first match of the day.

An emotional Novak Djokovic will not be involved in the final of the Adria Tour exhibition event in Belgrade despite beating Alexander Zverev on Sunday.

The world number one needed to triumph in straight sets to finish top of Group Novak Djokovic, but his hopes of progressing were dashed when he lost the second to his German opponent.

While the home favourite did go on to record a 4-0, 1-4, 4-2 victory at the Novak Tennis Centre in Belgrade, it was not enough.

“I am not crying because I got knocked out of the tournament, I am just overwhelmed by emotion because this reminds me of my childhood," Djokovic told the crowd. 

"It's been an emotional few days and I want to thank everyone who made this possible. The important thing after this match is that we have one of our own in the final. I love you all and thank you so much for turning up."

Djokovic had opened his campaign at the tournament with a comfortable win over Viktor Troicki on Saturday, though he did come off second best in a point played against a ball boy, who thrilled the crowd with a successful drop shot.

Playing again in the evening session, the 17-time grand slam champion suffered his first loss of 2020, coming out on the wrong side of a deciding set in his contest against Filip Krajinovic.

Djokovic compiled an impressive 18-0 record on the ATP Tour this year, including winning the Australian Open, before the season was suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Krajinovic will instead provide a home presence in Sunday's final, a victory over Troicki enough to see him top the table.

He will go up against Dominic Thiem, who defeated Grigor Dimitrov in straight sets to progress from a group named after his opponent.

Novak Djokovic suffered his first loss of 2020 as the Adria Tour exhibition event got underway in Belgrade on Saturday.

The 17-time grand slam champion started the event with a 4-1 4-1 victory over fellow Serbian Viktor Troicki.

However, Djokovic was stunned by Filip Krajinovic 2-4 4-2 4-1 in his second match, beaten for the first time this year.

Djokovic was 18-0 on the ATP Tour in 2020, including winning the Australian Open, before the season was suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The 33-year-old launched the Adria Tour last month, although the event scheduled for Montenegro later in June was cancelled.

Alexander Zverev and Dominic Thiem claimed two wins from as many matches on Saturday.

Dominic Thiem and Alexander Zverev have cast doubt over whether the US Open can go ahead as scheduled amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The grand slam is due to get under way on August 31, but New York has been hard hit by the COVID-19 crisis.

World number one Novak Djokovic this week described the restrictions that players would be subjected to in order for the major to be staged as "extreme" and "impossible".

It has been suggested players will have restrictions on the size of their entourages for the tournament, while access to outside courts at the venue will be limited and players arriving from outside the United States could face a quarantine period.

Rafael Nadal, Ash Barty and Simona Halep are among the other stars to have questioned whether it is realistic for them to be taking to the court at Flushing Meadows.

Thiem and Zverev also expressed their reservations on Friday.

Speaking in Belgrade before featuring in Adria Tour exhibition matches arranged by Djokovic, Thiem said: "All of these circumstances are pretty tough.

"I think some circumstances will have to change [for it to] make sense to go there [New York]."

The world number three added: "Well nobody knows, maybe things improve, maybe not, so we'll have to wait until the facts are out and then decide."

Zverev, the world number seven, said: "It's great if we get the opportunity to play, but under these circumstances I don't think a lot of players will feel comfortable in the environment there.

"So that's my opinion. But it's not really up to us players in that way; in a way, the US Open decides."

The ATP Tour is suspended until at least the end of July.

Novak Djokovic kept it quiet that he was able to train almost every day during lockdown as the world number one did not want to "infuriate other players".

Djokovic is back in Serbia after spending two months in Marbella, as the coronavirus pandemic prevented him from returning to his homeland.

The 17-time grand slam champion, who is set to host and play in the new Adria Tour next month, did not want to make it public that he had been able to stay more active than most of his rivals during his time in Spain.

He said at a press conference in Belgrade on Monday: "Unlike many other players, I was able to train almost every day because we resided in a house with a tennis court.

"I refrained from posting clips on social networks because I didn't want to infuriate other players. I am fit and in good shape, so I am looking forward to the Adria Tour, which I am organising."

Djokovic, who turned 33 last Friday, revealed that Alexander Zverev is the latest player who has committed to playing on the Adria Tour.

The world number seven has agreed to play in the June 13-14 event in Belgrade and could be on court in Zadar, Croatia a week later.

Djokovic added that matches in Montenegro and Bosnia-Herzegovina have not yet been 100 per cent confirmed.

The events have been arranged to raise money for "humanitarian projects across the region" as well as helping tennis players get back in shape during the ATP Tour suspension.

Dominic Thiem and Grigor Dimitrov are among the other players who will feature.

Australian Open semi-finalist and German star Alexander Zverev suspects he contracted coronavirus in December.

COVID-19 has wreaked havoc across the world, with more than 69,300 deaths globally and sport brought to a standstill.

All ATP and WTA tournaments have been called off until mid-July, with Wimbledon cancelled, due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Zverev produced his best grand slam performance at the Australian Open, where he reached the semi-finals in January, and the 22-year-old believes he may have been infected prior to the year's opening major in Melbourne.

"My friend Brenda and I were in China on December 28," the world number seven told Bild.

"You can't imagine how I coughed for a month in Australia. I had a fever for two or three days and I coughed for five or six hours. Brenda too. We didn't know what it was. It was a cough that I never had. I had no pain, but I coughed continuously every 10 seconds.

"I had no pain, but I coughed continuously every ten seconds."

Top seed Rafael Nadal advanced to the Mexican Open quarter-finals in straight sets, while Alexander Zverev was a shock casualty.

Nadal – playing his first competitive tournament since the Australian Open – produced some highlight moments as he saw off Miomir Kecmanovic 6-2 7-5 in Acapulco on Wednesday.

A two-time winner of the ATP 500 event, world number two Nadal was a class above against his Serbian opponent to stay on course for the title.

After his powerful display, the 19-time grand slam champion will face Kwon Soon-woo for a spot in the semi-finals after the South African beat eighth seed Dusan Lajovic 7-6 (7-2) 6-0.

Australian Open semi-finalist Zverev was bundled out of the tournament by American qualifier Tommy Paul 6-3 6-4.

Zverev dropped his opening service game and it was a sign of things to come for the German star as Paul capitalised to eventually claim the biggest win of his career.

Next up for 22-year-old Paul is fifth seed John Isner, who downed fellow American Marcos Giron 6-3 7-6 (7-4).

Grigor Dimitrov saved two match points as he prevailed 6-7 (8-10) 6-2 7-6 (7-2) against Adrian Mannarino in a thriller.

Mannarino erased Dimitrov's 4-1 lead in the final set to earn a pair of match points but the Bulgarian rallied to set up a showdown with third seed Stan Wawrinka, who eased past Pedro Martinez 6-4 6-4.

Elsewhere, fourth seed Felix Auger-Aliassime was surprised 6-4 6-4 by Kyle Edmund and Taylor Fritz topped Ugo Humbert 6-4 6-1.

At the Chile Open in Santiago, seeds Casper Ruud, Hugo Dellien and Federico Delbonis all moved through to the quarters but Pablo Cuevas fell to qualifier Renzo Olivo.

Top seed Rafael Nadal advanced to the Mexican Open quarter-finals in straight sets, while Alexander Zverev was a shock casualty.

Nadal – playing his first competitive tournament since the Australian Open – produced some highlight moments as he saw off Miomir Kecmanovic 6-2 7-5 in Acapulco on Wednesday.

A two-time winner of the ATP 500 event, world number two Nadal was a class above against his Serbian opponent to stay on course for the title.

After his powerful display, the 19-time grand slam champion will face Kwon Soon-woo for a spot in the semi-finals after the South African beat eighth seed Dusan Lajovic 7-6 (7-2) 6-0.

Australian Open semi-finalist Zverev was bundled out of the tournament by American qualifier Tommy Paul 6-3 6-4.

Zverev dropped his opening service game and it was a sign of things to come for the German star as Paul capitalised to eventually claim the biggest win of his career.

Next up for 22-year-old Paul is fifth seed John Isner, who downed fellow American Marcos Giron 6-3 7-6 (7-4).

Grigor Dimitrov saved two match points as he prevailed 6-7 (8-10) 6-2 7-6 (7-2) against Adrian Mannarino in a thriller.

Mannarino erased Dimitrov's 4-1 lead in the final set to earn a pair of match points but the Bulgarian rallied to set up a showdown with third seed Stan Wawrinka, who eased past Pedro Martinez 6-4 6-4.

Elsewhere, fourth seed Felix Auger-Aliassime was surprised 6-4 6-4 by Kyle Edmund and Taylor Fritz topped Ugo Humbert 6-4 6-1.

At the Chile Open in Santiago, seeds Casper Ruud, Hugo Dellien and Federico Delbonis all moved through to the quarters but Pablo Cuevas fell to qualifier Renzo Olivo.

Top seed Rafael Nadal advanced to the Mexican Open quarter-finals in straight sets, while Alexander Zverev was a shock casualty.

Nadal – playing his first competitive tournament since the Australian Open – produced some highlight moments as he saw off Miomir Kecmanovic 6-2 7-5 in Acapulco on Wednesday.

A two-time winner of the ATP 500 event, world number two Nadal was a class above against his Serbian opponent to stay on course for the title.

After his powerful display, the 19-time grand slam champion will face Kwon Soon-woo for a spot in the semi-finals after the South African beat eighth seed Dusan Lajovic 7-6 (7-2) 6-0.

Australian Open semi-finalist Zverev was bundled out of the tournament by American qualifier Tommy Paul 6-3 6-4.

Zverev dropped his opening service game and it was a sign of things to come for the German star as Paul capitalised to eventually claim the biggest win of his career.

Next up for 22-year-old Paul is fifth seed John Isner, who downed fellow American Marcos Giron 6-3 7-6 (7-4).

Grigor Dimitrov saved two match points as he prevailed 6-7 (8-10) 6-2 7-6 (7-2) against Adrian Mannarino in a thriller.

Mannarino erased Dimitrov's 4-1 lead in the final set to earn a pair of match points but the Bulgarian rallied to set up a showdown with third seed Stan Wawrinka, who eased past Pedro Martinez 6-4 6-4.

Elsewhere, fourth seed Felix Auger-Aliassime was surprised 6-4 6-4 by Kyle Edmund and Taylor Fritz topped Ugo Humbert 6-4 6-1.

At the Chile Open in Santiago, seeds Casper Ruud, Hugo Dellien and Federico Delbonis all moved through to the quarters but Pablo Cuevas fell to qualifier Renzo Olivo.

Rafael Nadal and Alexander Zverev moved through at the Mexican Open, while Nick Kyrgios was booed as his title defence came to an end.

A two-time champion of the event, top seed Nadal cruised past Spanish compatriot Pablo Andujar 6-3 6-2 on Tuesday.

In competitive action for the first time since the Australian Open, Nadal needed just 90 minutes to post his fourth victory in as many meetings with Andujar.

Zverev, the second seed at the ATP 500 tournament, survived an early battle before getting past Jason Jung 7-6 (8-6) 6-1.

Last year's runner-up, Zverev served 12 aces and broke four times in his victory.

Kyrgios beat Zverev in the final in 2019, but the Australian lasted just 31 minutes in the first round.

Ugo Humbert took the first set 6-3 when Kyrgios retired due to a wrist injury, the 24-year-old receiving some boos as he left the court.

Kyrgios was the only seed to fall as Felix Auger-Aliassime, John Isner, Grigor Dimitrov and Dusan Lajovic advanced at the hard-court tournament.

Taylor Fritz, Pedro Martinez and Kwon Soon-woo were also among the winners.

At the Chile Open in Santiago, seeds Juan Ignacio Londero, Federico Delbonis and Thiago Monteiro all got through their first-round matches.

Dominic Thiem hopes to find the perfect balance between attack and defence against Novak Djokovic in the Australian Open final, but accepts it is a fine line.

Thiem booked his spot in a third grand slam final and first in Melbourne by edging Alexander Zverev 3-6 6-4 7-6 (7-3) 7-6 (7-4) on Rod Laver Arena on Friday.

The Austrian will face seven-time champion Djokovic in Sunday's final, and goes into that clash on the back of four wins in his past five meetings with the Serbian great.

Thiem, 26, said controlled aggression was a key when taking on Djokovic, who will be playing a record eighth Australian Open men's singles final.

"I think I have to keep a good balance. Of course, I have to risk a lot. I have to go for many shots," he told a news conference.

"At the same time, of course, not too much. That's a very thin line. In the last match against him, hit that line perfectly in London [at the ATP Finals].

"Of course, going to take a look at that match, how I played, and try to repeat it.

"But for sure he's the favourite. I mean, he won seven titles here, never lost a final, going for his eighth one. I'm feeling good on the court. I'm playing great tennis, so try to be at my absolutely best on Sunday."

A two-time French Open runner-up, Thiem's run to the final in Melbourne has come as a surprise, having previously never been beyond the fourth round at the Australian Open.

Considered a bigger threat on clay, Thiem said winning the Indian Wells Masters last year had boosted his confidence.

"First of all, Indian Wells, that victory gave me so much relief and so much confidence because finally got my first Masters 1000 title on hard court," he said.

"I mean, there in Indian Wells in the desert, it's pretty similar to clay. It's perfect for my game, balls bouncing so high.

"Then I think last fall in Asia, then in the indoor season, I made this huge step forward. I really developed my game I think in the right direction.

"I got more aggressive on hard courts, started to serve smarter and to return better. That also gave me a lot of confidence for this new year and for Australia because I told myself, 'If I can be in the finals in London, the ATP Finals, why not as well in a hard-court slam?' Since then I know that I'm also playing very well on the faster surfaces."

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