Australia captain Aaron Finch admitted he was fearing being on the end of a stunning Bangladesh run chase in their high-scoring Trent Bridge clash.

The defending champions eventually secured a 48-run victory to move a step closer to the semi-finals of the Cricket World Cup.

But after posting 381-5 the result should never have been in doubt, and the fact Bangladesh could reach 333-8 and threaten at one stage to get much closer was worrying to Finch.

Mushfiqur Rahim and Mahmudullah put on 127 for Bangladesh's fifth wicket but the run rate eventually became too demanding. Mahmudullah's dismissal for 69 precipitated a lower-order collapse and Australia were comfortable enough winners in the end.

Asked if he was getting butterflies at any stage, Finch said: "Absolutely. Every time a team starts to get a partnership going, and they're experienced players – I think that's what worries you a lot at times, the experience of the players.

"When they get in they know how to get home in a run chase. I thought our boys held our nerve pretty well though."

Mushfiqur went on to reach 102 not out, and Tamim Iqbal at the top of the order also made a useful 62.

Finch accepted Australia's error-ridden fielding had been uncomfortable to experience.

"Very sloppy, wasn't it," he said. "It was disappointing actually because we always pride ourselves on our fielding. Early on it was quite wet and slippery but no excuses… pretty poor."

Australia opener David Warner made a superb 166 – his second century of this World Cup and 16th in ODIs.

It puts him joint third with Adam Gilchrist in the ranks of Australia's most prolific century makers in the 50-over format, and Warner said on receiving his man-of-the-match award: "Obviously it's a great achievement. But I think for us it's about getting these two points and then moving on to the next game at Lord's."

England are Australia's next opponents, on Tuesday.

Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza said: "When we batted I thought Mushy, Shakib [Al Hasan] and obviously Tamim batted so well. I think 381 is just too much."

David Warner dominated Bangladesh with the highest score of the Cricket World Cup as Australia took another stride towards the semi-finals with a 48-run victory at Trent Bridge.

Warner has been in outstanding form and moved to another level in Nottingham, capitalising on being dropped by Sabbir Rahman on 10 by smashing 166 off 147 balls to become the leading run-scorer in the tournament.

The opening batsman's explosive 16th ODI hundred was Australia's second-highest individual World Cup score - Warner having also posted the biggest of 178 versus Afghanistan four years ago.

Usman Khawaja (89) returned to form after Aaron Finch struck 53, with Soumya Sarkar taking 3-58 as the holders put 381-5 on the board in another Nottingham run-fest.

Mushfiqur Rahim (102 not out) made a brilliant first World Cup century and there were half-centuries for Tamim Iqbal (62) and Mahmudullah (69), yet Bangladesh were unable to pull off a repeat of their huge successful run-chase against West Indies on Monday.

The Tigers did post their highest ODI score of 333-8, but they nevertheless suffered a defeat that strikes a major blow to their hopes of reaching the last four as Australia went top of the table.

 

IMPERIOUS WARNER PUNISHES SABBIR

Sabbir was brought in to make his first appearance of the tournament as one of two changes to the Tigers side and he did not get off to the best of starts, putting Warner down at backward point before he had got going.

The left-hander made him pay in brutal fashion after biding his time, slog-sweeping Shakib Al Hasan for a massive six and bringing up his half-century in 55 balls.

Warner then accelerated with a magnificent combination of power and improvisation following Finch's exit, clearing the ropes five times and putting on 192 for the second wicket with Khawaja, who passed 50 for the first time in the tournament.

 

MUSHFIQUR AND MAHMUDULLAH PROVIDE RESISTANCE

Glenn Maxwell (32 from 10) also did some late damage after Warner and Khawaja had been dismissed by Soumya, who missed out with the bat when he was run out by Finch following a big mix-up.

The fit-again Marcus Stoinis (2-54) claimed the big wicket of the in-form Shakib (41) and the Tigers were 144-3 almost halfway through their innings when Tamim chopped on.

Mitchell Starc rattled Liton Das on the helmet straight after ending Tamim's knock and the number five was on his way after being trapped in front by Adam Zampa, but Mushfiqur and Mahmudullah made a game of it.

 

STARC AND AUSTRALIA RISE TO THE SUMMIT

Nathan Coulter-Nile (2-58) ended an 83-ball stand when Mahmudullah holed out after hitting three sixes and five fours in a swashbuckling 50-ball knock, while the Australia seamer compounded Sabbir's misery by bowling him first ball.

Starc (2-55) became the top wicket-taker in the tournament and, although the excellent Mushfiqur reached three figures in the penultimate over, Australia comfortably made it five wins out of six.

The in-form David Warner bludgeoned the highest score of the 2019 Cricket World Cup with an imperious innings as Australia piled on the runs against Bangladesh at Trent Bridge on Thursday.

Warner smashed his second hundred of the tournament, having also made two half-centuries, and fell just 13 runs short of his ODI-best score when he was removed for a magnificent 166 after being dropped on 10 by Sabbir Rahman.

The Australia opener's brutal 166 from 147 balls bettered the previous joint-best knocks of the World Cup of 153 - posted by Warner's captain Aaron Finch and England's Jason Roy.

Warner played himself in before he was at his powerful best in Nottingham, hitting five sixes and 14 fours in a scintillating innings.

His latest masterclass of clean striking was Australia's second best in a World Cup, Warner holding the record of 178 against Afghanistan four years ago.

Holders Australia were 313-2 in the 45th over when former vice-captain Warner tamely steered a delivery from Soumya Sarkar to Rubel Hossain on the edge of the circle when attempting to go over the top.

Usman Khawaja was then dismissed for 89 from only 72 balls after he and Warner put on 192 for the second wicket.

Warner's highest international score in the 50-over format remains the 179 he made versus Pakistan at the Adelaide Oval two years ago.

Australia are wary of the threat posed by Shakib Al Hasan as they prepare to encounter the Cricket World Cup's leading run-scorer at Trent Bridge on Thursday.

The all-rounder has scored 384 in four innings so far, including a pair of centuries in his last two visits, and there is no disguising the fact he is Bangladesh's main threat.

Shakib made 124 not out as the Tigers chased down 322 inside 42 overs to hammer West Indies at Taunton on Monday, a victory that left them just two points adrift of the semi-final spots.

"I think he's in probably career-best form with the white ball," said Australia wicketkeeper Alex Carey of Shakib. "So we sort of know the areas and line and length we want to bowl to him and I guess out there we'll assess the conditions as well.

"No extra planning, I don't think. We normally have our plans going into every game and we assess each player accordingly.

"In terms of what we're going to bowl, we leave that up to the bowlers and the captain to do that, but we'd love to get him out early. He's in great form, along with the other players."

Australia could bring all-rounder Marcus Stoinis back into their side after he recovered from the side strain that saw him miss matches against Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

 

TOURNAMENT SO FAR

Australia have won four games from five to sit in a strong position to reach the semi-finals. Captain Aaron Finch is having a fine tournament with the bat, making 343 in five innings to date.

Bangladesh enter the match with two wins and two defeats plus one no-result due to rain. They cruised to a seven-wicket win over the Windies last time out.

WHAT THEY SAID

Carey: "Obviously Bangladesh are playing some really good cricket at the moment and it's led by Shakib. He's one guy we want to get out early."

Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza: "Shakib is brilliant. The way he's playing, I think we need to support him as well, his team. It's not been a one-man army, but as you said he's been doing outstandingly."

OPTA FACTS

- These two sides have been involved in 19 completed ODIs, with Australia winning 18 of those and losing just once, in Cardiff 14 years ago.

- Australia have won the World Cup more often than any other side (five times) and are looking to win this tournament for the fifth time in their last six attempts; Bangladesh are yet to reach the semi-final stage.

- Steve Smith is set to register his 100th ODI innings for Australia in this match. He has scored 3,674 runs across his previous 99 knocks and heads into this contest on the back of a 59-ball 73 against Sri Lanka.

- Shakib Al Hasan has managed to register 50 runs or more in five successive ODI knocks. No batsman has ever posted six half-centuries on the spin for Bangladesh. Shakib is currently tied for the record with Tamim Iqbal, who made five 50-plus scores in succession in 2012.

Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza called on his team to follow Shakib Al Hasan's "exceptional" contributions after a match-winning turn against West Indies.

Shakib made an unbeaten 124 - his second century in a row - as Bangladesh completed their highest ODI run chase and ran out resounding seven-wicket winners in Taunton.

Liton Das (94 not out) and Tamim Iqbal (48) also weighed in, but Mortaza acknowledged Shakib, who became the tournament's highest-scoring player on Monday, has been the Tigers' star of the Cricket World Cup so far.

Bangladesh are up to fifth in the standings with five points from as many matches and more performances like Shakib's could boost their chances of making the semi-finals.

"He has made it at this World Cup and delivered for the team," Mortaza said in the post-match presentation. "Every match he has come and brought something really exceptional.

"Hopefully he'll keep going and others will join him. In the last two matches, Mushy [Mushfiqur Rahim] has batted so well; today, Tamim and Soumya [Sarkar (29)] started batting so well."

For Shakib, another strong batting display was just reward for his own hard work and a call to move up to number three.

"It feels great - obviously to stay at the wicket until the end was the most satisfying thing," Shakib said. "I've been working on my batting for the past month and a half and it's been paying off.

"I know that if I bat at number three I'll get more opportunities, I'll get more time to bat. Sometimes, if I bat at number five, I'll come in at the 30th over or the 40th over, which is not ideal for me. So I wanted to bat up the order."

Asked about the prospect of another ton against Australia on Thursday, he replied: "I hope so. It'll be tough, especially playing against Australia, who are picking up their form. We have to bring our A-game."

The Windies were particularly disappointing with the ball but beaten skipper Jason Holder felt the problems started with a total of 321-8.

"We just didn't get enough runs," Holder said. "But having said that, I still think we could have been a lot more disciplined with the ball and we let ourselves down in the field as well.

"It was just a situation where we never got the momentum we probably should in the middle overs. We had too much to do at the back end.

"If you score 320 here, you've got to fight really hard in the field to defend it. We didn't get wickets and we let one or two chances slip."

Shakib Al Hasan's superb Cricket World Cup continued as he compiled an unbeaten century to lead Bangladesh to an emphatic seven-wicket win over West Indies at Taunton.

The Tigers were undaunted by a target of 322, in-form all-rounder Shakib leading the way with 124 not out - a second successive hundred for the tournament's leading run-scorer - against a sluggish Windies attack.

Liton Das added an unbeaten 94, sharing 189 with Shakib on a memorable day for Bangladesh, who romped home with 51 balls to spare and leapfrogged Windies into fifth position in the group stage.

West Indies' own qualification hopes look increasingly slim and they got off to a poor start when opener Chris Gayle was caught behind off Mohammad Saifuddin (3-72) for a 13-ball duck.

Shai Hope (96 off 121 balls) and Evin Lewis (70 off 67) responded impressively to lay a strong platform, before Shimron Hetmyer (50 off 26) and skipper Jason Holder (33 off 15) raised the tempo in the latter stages of an innings that featured three wickets for Mustafizur Rahman and two for Shakib.

A total of 321-8 looked to have left Bangladesh facing a tall order, given no team had chased down more than 245 in the competition prior to Monday.

However, the Tigers got off to a quick start through openers Tamim Iqbal (48) and Soumya Sarkar (29), with the Windies looking lacklustre in the field, before Shakib took centre stage once again.

Having made 75, 64 and 121 in his previous three innings, Shakib maintained his fine form and found an able partner in Das, with the pair able to score freely all around the wicket.

The beleaguered Windies simply had no answer to Bangladesh's fourth-wicket pair, with Das even hitting Shannon Gabriel for three sixes in a row as his side closed in on a hugely convincing victory.

 

Tigers in the hunt for semis, Windies on the brink

Monday's result realistically preserved Bangladesh's hopes of reaching the semi-finals. They are up to fifth in the table, having beaten South Africa and the Windies in impressive fashion.

However, after a heavy defeat to England in their previous match, this was another dire performance from West Indies, whose bowling left much to be desired. Since thrashing Pakistan in their opening game, Holder's men have lost three matches and seen another rained off. It is hard to see them recovering from here.

 

Shakib reaches landmark 

What a tournament it has been for Shakib, who once again starred for Bangladesh here as well as passing the impressive milestone of 6,000 ODI runs. It was a world-class performance of real maturity and skill from the 32-year-old, who has relished the responsibility of stepping up in the batting order to number three. He also made a key contribution with the ball at Taunton, taking two wickets including the valuable scalp of Lewis. 

South Africa may have to win all of their remaining group-stage matches to earn a place in the Cricket World Cup semi-finals and Faf du Plessis' side face two tricky challenges this week.

The Proteas lost their first three games at this tournament, belatedly getting a point on the board with a washout against West Indies before picking up their first win thanks to a comfortable triumph over Afghanistan last week.

But things certainly do not get any easier for South Africa over the coming seven days, as they take on an unbeaten New Zealand and a mercurial Pakistan, who desperately need a win themselves following Sunday's resounding defeat to fierce rivals India.

Virat Kohli's side look the strongest all-round outfit in the competition and they should pick up another victory against Afghanistan, who also face hosts England in a tough week for the only team yet to claim a point.

 

FIXTURES

Monday 17 June:  West Indies v Bangladesh (Taunton) - 1030 BST start

Tuesday 18 June:  England v Afghanistan (Old Trafford) - 1030

Wednesday 19 June:  New Zealand v South Africa (Edgbaston) - 1030

Thursday 20 June:  Australia v Bangladesh (Trent Bridge) - 1030

Friday 21 June:  England v Sri Lanka (Headingley) - 1030

Saturday 22 June:  India v Afghanistan (the Rose Bowl) - 1030, West Indies v New Zealand (Old Trafford) - 1330

Sunday 23 June:  Pakistan v South Africa (Lord's) - 1030

 

THE WEEK'S BIG GAME

With over half their matches played and only three points to their name, South Africa can ill-afford any slip-ups. Their first assignment of the week comes against the Black Caps on Wednesday, in a repeat of the thrilling semi-final from four years ago that saw New Zealand squeeze through. If the Proteas can dish out a first defeat of the tournament to Kane Williamson's side, they will go into Sunday's clash against an erratic Pakistan with renewed hope of securing a top-four finish.

STANDINGS

1. Australia - 8pts from 5 games, Net Run Rate +0.812
2. New Zealand - 7pts from 4 games, NRR +2.163
3. India - 7pts from 4 games, NRR +1.029
4. England - 6pts from 4 games, NRR +1.557
5. Sri Lanka - 4pts from 5 games, NRR -1.778
6. West Indies - 3pts from 4 games, NRR +0.666
7. South Africa - 3pts from 5 games, NRR -0.208
8. Bangladesh - 3pts from 4 games, NRR -0.714
9. Pakistan - 3pts from 5 games, NRR -1.933
10. Afghanistan - 0pts from 4 games, NRR -1.638

 

LEADING RUN-SCORERS

1: Aaron Finch (Aus) - 343
2: Rohit Sharma (Ind) - 319
3: David Warner (Aus) - 281

 

LEADING WICKET-TAKERS

=1: Mohammad Amir (Pak), Mitchell Starc (Aus) - 13
2: Pat Cummins (Aus) - 11

West Indies are confident Andre Russell will be fit to face Bangladesh at Taunton on Monday in what could prove a pivotal World Cup match.

The all-rounder was forced off the field in Friday's match against England because of a knee problem, and could only bowl two overs.

A fit Russell is a major asset to West Indies and captain Jason Holder said the Jamaican was "progressing quite nicely", with a final decision on his availability to be left until the morning of the match.

Holder allayed concerns over Evin Lewis, who took a blow to the body in the nets, saying the opener had only "a little bruise" and should be fit to play. Lewis has scored just three runs in two innings so the Windies will be relying on him to improve on that, if selected.

Bangladesh have won seven of their last nine ODIs against the Windies, including the last four matches, and Holder said his team would look to counter that recent history.

"If you want to put us in the underdog category, fair enough," Holder said on Sunday. "We've played them quite a bit in the recent past and they've gotten the better of us in recent past. [This is a] different stage, lots at stake for this game. We're all up for it."

Bangladesh are hopeful Mushfiqur Rahim will be able to take part after X-ray and MRI scans gave him the all-clear following a nets scare.

The wicketkeeper-batsman was hit on the hand by a delivery from team-mate Mustafizur Rahman but was "totally fine" on Sunday, according to captain Mashrafe Mortaza.

Bangladesh and West Indies have both won once, lost twice and had a match rained off at the World Cup, leaving five matches to play.

Both are seeking to rediscover early momentum, knowing further defeats at this stage will put their semi-final hopes in serious doubt.

 

TOURNAMENT SO FAR

Bangladesh have shown flashes of their potential, beginning with victory over South Africa before losing a tight match to New Zealand. Their bowlers could not cope with England's brutal batting in Cardiff, however, and that is sure to have alerted the likes of Chris Gayle.

West Indies also started strongly by rolling over Pakistan at Trent Bridge. They fell just short against Australia at the same ground but were crushed by eight wickets against England at Southampton, an outcome that shattered some of the optimistic illusions around their pace attack.

WHAT THEY SAID

Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza: "We still have five matches left. So you never know. You don't have to think [about] all those five matches. Tomorrow's match is very important. We have to take one by one. It's been ups and downs. But still a lot of matches left. We can make the difference. And we have to believe in it, which I believe that my team is believing."

West Indies captain Jason Holder: "I don't want to sit here and try to perceive what they would come with, but we're open to anything. Traditionally they rely heavily on their spinners. We don't expect them to move too far away from it. It's a smallish ground. I saw the wicket today as well. There's quite a bit of grass on it. We'll see how it plays. But we know what we're expecting in a sense from Bangladesh. And I can't see them being much different from that."


OPTA FACTS

- Bangladesh have lost their last two completed World Cup matches and have not lost three in a row in the same World Cup since the 2007 tournament. The last defeat in that run came against West Indies.

- West Indies all-rounder Andre Russell has an ODI batting strike rate of 130.6, the best of any batsman from any country to score 500 or more runs in the format.

- West Indies batsman Shimron Hetmyer needs 34 runs to reach 1,000 in ODIs. He averages 40.3 with the bat so far in his career.

- Bangladesh paceman Mustafizur Rahman is set to play his 50th ODI. He already has 87 wickets to his name at an average of 23.4 - the best average of anyone to take more than five wickets for Bangladesh.

- Shakib Al Hasan requires 23 more runs to become the second player to score 6,000 men’s ODI runs for Bangladesh, joining Tamim Iqbal who stands on 6,695.

Bangladesh fast bowling coach Courtney Walsh expects his team to come back strongly as they take on West Indies in their fifth game of the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup 2019 in Taunton on Monday. 

Bangladesh head coach Steve Rhodes believes there should've been reserve days at this year's ICC World Cup, after a second abandoned match in two days.

ICC chief executive David Richardson said reserve days for weather reasons in the first phase of the Cricket World Cup would be "extremely complex to deliver" after a third match in five days ended without a result.

Unseasonable rain across the United Kingdom continued to impact the tournament on Tuesday, with Bangladesh's clash against Sri Lanka in Bristol abandoned without a ball being bowled.

It followed a no result in Monday's clash between South Africa and West Indies, in which just 7.3 overs were played, and another complete washout on Friday for Pakistan's meeting against luckless Sri Lanka.

Bangladesh coach Steve Rhodes argued the case for reserve days during the initial phase of the Cricket World Cup on Tuesday, saying: "We put men on the moon, so why can't we have a reserve day, when actually this tournament is a long tournament."

With rain and forecasts the talk of the cricket world, outgoing ICC boss Richardson said that Rhodes' suggestion was not plausible for a host of reasons.

"Factoring in a reserve day for every match at the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup would significantly increase the length of the tournament and practically would be extremely complex to deliver," Richardson said in a statement.

"It would impact pitch preparation, team recovery and travel days, accommodation and venue availability, tournament staffing, volunteer and match officials availability, broadcast logistics and very importantly the spectators who in some instances have travelled hours to be at the game.

"There is also no guarantee that the reserve day would be free from rain either."

Richardson added reserve days would be in place later in the tournament, before expressing his disappointment with the British weather.

"We have reserve days factored in for the knock-out stages, knowing that over the course of 45 group games we should play the large majority," he added.

"This is extremely unseasonable weather. In the last couple of days we have experienced more than twice the average monthly rainfall for June which is usually the third driest month in the UK. In 2018 there was just 2mm of rain in June but the last 24 hours alone has seen around 100mm fall in the south-east of England.  

"When a match is affected by weather conditions, the venue team work closely with Match Officials and Ground Staff to ensure that we have the best possible opportunity to play cricket, even if it is a reduced-overs game."

Weather permitting, the Cricket World Cup will continue on Wednesday when Australia face Pakistan in Taunton.

Bangladesh are "very optimistic" Shakib Al Hasan will overcome a thigh injury in time to face West Indies next Monday at the Cricket World Cup.

All-rounder Shakib strained his left thigh while batting during the clash with host nation England on Saturday, though he still went on to score a century in a losing cause in Cardiff.

The Tigers saw Tuesday's fixture against Sri Lanka washed out in Bristol but now have a break from action in the tournament, giving the 32-year-old time to undergo further treatment.

"He picked up a little injury, as you all saw in that game against England," Bangladesh coach Steve Rhodes told the media.

"He fought on, battled on and played extremely well with an injury.

"We're very, very optimistic that the treatment that he'll get this week and the way that he can recover well. We're very optimistic that he can play in that next game against West Indies."

Bangladesh's game with Sri Lanka was the second at this year's World Cup to be abandoned without any play whatsoever, while South Africa and West Indies managed just 7.3 overs in Southampton on Monday.

With teams picking up just a solitary point for rained-off fixtures, rain could have a crucial say in deciding who qualifies for the semi-finals.

Englishman Rhodes knows all about the unpredictable weather in his home country, leading him to suggest the World Cup may have benefited from building reserve days into the schedule for the group stage.

"If you know the English weather, sadly we're going to get a lot of rain," said Rhodes, who played 11 Tests and nine ODI games for England in his playing career.

"We never know when the rain is going to come. People from all over the world keep asking me whether it's going to rain; I don't know. But, at the moment, we're seeing some problems.

"And I know logistically it would have been a big headache for the tournament organisers, and I know that it would have been difficult, but we have got quite a lot of time in between games, and if we have got to travel a day later, then so be it.

"We put men on the moon, so why can we not have a reserve day, when actually this tournament is a long tournament? They are spread out, the games.

"I would say that it's disappointing for the crowd as well. They have got tickets to see a game of cricket and it would be up to them if they can get there the day after."

Sri Lanka were again left frustrated by the Bristol weather as their Cricket World Cup clash with Bangladesh was washed out on Tuesday.

No play was possible when Sri Lanka were due to face Pakistan on Friday and rain put paid to the match at the same venue four days later.

Both sides were looking for a second win of the tournament, but persistent rain made conditions unplayable.

West Indies and South Africa also had to settle for a point apiece when their match was called off on Monday, with the struggling Proteas in trouble on 29-2 after 7.3 overs at the Rose Bowl.

Sri Lanka will now turn their attention to facing holders Australia at The Oval on Saturday, while Bangladesh have to wait until Monday for their next match against the Windies at Taunton.

Sri Lanka and Bangladesh could be frustrated by the weather as they eye a second victory at the Cricket World Cup on Tuesday.

Rain is forecast in Bristol a day after the clash between West Indies and South Africa was abandoned, with just 7.3 overs bowled at the Rose Bowl.

Sri Lanka's match against Pakistan last Friday was washed out at the County Ground and the rain may ruin things once more for two sides in need of some sort of contest as they look to defy the odds and reach the semi-finals.

Paceman Nuwan Pradeep was ruled out of Sri Lanka's fourth match of the tournament with a dislocated finger, which he sustained in a practice session on Sunday.

Bangladesh, beaten in all three previous World Cup meetings between the two nations, have an injury concern over key man Shakib Al Hasan (quad).

 

TOURNAMENT SO FAR

Sri Lanka made an abysmal start, losing by 10 wickets to New Zealand after being dismissed for only 136. They responded with a victory over Afghanistan before being rain prevented them from facing the ICC Champions Trophy holders.

Bangladesh saw off South Africa in an Oval run-fest before the Black Caps consigned them to a tense two-wicket loss. Hosts England then downed the Tigers by 106 runs in Cardiff on Saturday despite a Shakib century.

 

WHAT THEY SAID

Sri Lanka batting coach Jon Lewis  "Our focus will be on us and us being positive on ourselves, and we'll believe even though we know it is a strong opposition, and an opposition that probably has the right to be confident because of the way they have played so far, we'll still be backing ourselves very strongly."

Bangladesh captain Mashrafe Mortaza: "There is still a lot of hope. The boys are really hungry to win matches. Pressure will be there, but we have to cope with the pressure and make sure we deliver."

 

OPTA FACTS

- Shakib has passed 50 in four consecutive ODIs. Tamim Iqbal (five) is the only batsman to have a longer streak for the Tigers.

- Lasith Malinga's 3-39 against Afghanistan meant the veteran has now moved inside the all-time top five list for most men's Cricket World Cup wickets (46), 

- Bangladesh beat Sri Lanka when they last took them on in this format, winning by a huge margin of 137 runs last September.

Jos Buttler looks set to be fit for England's Cricket World Cup match against West Indies on Friday as he recovers from a hip injury.

The wicketkeeper-batsman appeared to pick up a knock while hitting a six in Saturday's win over Bangladesh, although he carried on batting after receiving treatment.

The 28-year-old smashed 64 from 44 balls but did not keep wicket, with Jonny Bairstow taking the gloves.

Captain Eoin Morgan insisted after a 106-run victory that Buttler stayed off the field as a precautionary measure and England are hoping he will make a swift return.

"Jos sustained heavy bruising on his right hip during the match against Bangladesh at Cardiff," said an England spokesperson.

"He is responding well to treatment and will be reassessed later this week.

"We anticipate he will train with the rest of the squad at the Hampshire Bowl on Wednesday ahead of the match against West Indies on Friday."

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