Rising sprint sensation Adaejah Hodge named in BVI's four-member team to Paris Games

By Sports Desk July 09, 2024

Rising sprint sensation Adaejah Hodge is set to make history as the youngest female athlete to compete in the women’s 200m at the Olympic Games, after she was named to the British Virgin Islands team to the upcoming multi-sport showpiece in Paris.

The 18-year-old, who won the women’s 100m and 200m at the BVI’s Championships, was included in a four-member team, which includes 40mm hurdles stalwart Kyron McMaster, sprinter Rikkoi Brathwaite, and Sailing representative Thad Lettsome.

While it will be her first Olympic Games appearance, Hodge is no stranger to the proverbial big league competitions, as she competed at last year’s World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, where she made the women’s 200m semi-finals.

Hodge’s Olympic appearance will not only mark a significant personal milestone, but more importantly, shines light on the promising future of young BVI athletes, who she will no doubt inspire.

Meanwhile, McMaster, 27, a seasoned campaigner in the 400m hurdles, will be hoping to repeat his silver medal-winning feat from last year’s World Championships, while Brathwaite and Lettsome are also poised to give good accounts of themselves in making BVI proud.

That said, the BVI Olympic committee expressed confidence in their team, as it pointed to the dedication and hard work of each athlete to represent the island nation at the elite level.

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