After fastest 400m in a decade, Natoya Goule says she has a lot more left in the tank

By April 26, 2021
Jamaica's 800m national record holder Natoya Goule Jamaica's 800m national record holder Natoya Goule

Natoya Goule says she feels she has a lot more left in the tank following her fastest 400m in a decade at the UCF Knights Invitational in Florida on Saturday.

Goule, who turned 30 in March, clocked 52.22 to win ahead of University of Central Florida’s Latasha Smith and Alabama State’s Kyana Evans, who ran 53.88 and 54.25, for second and third, respectively.

It was Goule’s fastest quarter-mile since she ran 51.52 in El Paso, Texas in April 2011.

 “I felt great. That was my second fastest 400 that I ever ran and the fastest since college so I am very pleased,” said the 30-year-old 800m specialist, who also ran as the pacesetter in the 800m.

“I think there is more in the tank and I have another 400 scheduled so I am looking forward to it and also see if I can better this time that I ran yesterday (Saturday).

She runs that next 400 in Athens, Georgia this coming weekend and explained that these 400m races and the 1500m she ran at the Florida State Relays in March, are all part of her plan to improve on her 800m for the Olympics this summer.

“I am working on both strength and speed. It is very important to have a balance for the 800m,” she explained.

“Actually, in previous years I also ran the 1500 and 400. The only difference now is that I am much stronger and my times have improved.”

She remains optimistic that the improved times in these other distances will help her run faster than her personal 1:56.15 run in Monaco in July 2018, which is also Jamaica’s national record. Should that happen, it is likely she will improve on her sixth-place finish at the 2019 World Championships in Doha where Uganda’s Halimah Nakaayi won the gold medal in 1:58.04.

 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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