NACAC Athletes Commission ready to bring their voice to Council

By Sports Desk February 17, 2021
Kineke Alexander Kineke Alexander

In its first information session, the NACAC Athletes Commission earlier this month, reaffirmed its commitment to becoming particularly active, increasing its visibility and working with all its athletes to address their issues and concerns.

The group will strive to make the NACAC Athletes Commission the best in World Athletics.

The Information Session was chaired by Saint Vincent and the Grenadines’ three-time Olympian, Kineke Alexander.

"I value my role on the NACAC Athletes commission as being a direct link between the athletes and the NACAC Council. We’ve moved from a commission that has been hiding in the shadows to now having hosted our first information session. It is important that throughout my role I work with my commission members so that the athletes in the NACAC region can be heard,” said Kineke Alexander, the 2015 Pan American Games 400m bronze medalist.

“As a member of the NACAC Council I plan on bringing the issues that matter most in our region. As stated in our information session, an important issue is having a viable competition circuit in the NACAC region. We plan on working with the NACAC Council who has been very open to this idea to make this happen for our athletes.”

The WA and NACAC Athletes Commission gave commitments to working together for the development and sustainability of the Commission.

World and Olympic champion, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM), moderated part of the information session that featured Brett Clothier, Head of the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU), who readily responded to questions posed by participants.

“We brought together dedicated athletes of our Area who understand the importance and function of the Commission and believe that athletes need to know they have a voice within athletics in our region and beyond. This is an athlete-centred group, and we represent all athletes. Athletes should know they have a place to voice their concerns” said Commission and NACAC Council member, 2008 Olympic 200m finalist Cydonie Mothersill (CAY).

 “We want to engage NACAC athletes, without exception, in meaningful dialogue on issues important to them as they play their part in building our sport. COVID-19 has taken a lot away from us in terms of competition, but it has also allowed us to reach more athletes on platforms like Zoom. Moving forward we will be hosting sessions on development, the athletes’ pathway, the new WADA code, and mentorship programs - issues we believe athletes want more information on.

 “Having athletes in our discussions and fully engaged in the decision-making process are very important. They feel fully integrated with our sport when they know that their views matter.”

 The information session also highlighted the importance of the biennial NACAC Senior Championship, a viable undertaking with the Area’s best athletes in attendance. Consideration was also given to working with the NACAC leadership to create an impressive annual Area Circuit.

 Led by Kineke Alexander and Odayne Richards (JAM) as Chair and Deputy Chair, the NACAC Athletes’ Commission is also composed of Michael Frater (JAM), Jeff Porter (USA), Lacee Barnes (CAY) Allan Gala Acevedo (GUA) and Nathan Alexander (ESA), Brian Wellman (BER). As Commission chair, Alexander sits on the NACAC Council.

 Four NACAC athletes are members of World Athletics’ Athletes Commission: Kim Collins (SKN), Iñaki Gomez (CAN), Bernard Lagat (USA) and Aisha Praught-Leer (JAM)

 

 

 

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