“We know we are looking at future World Champions,” says Grange as INSPORTS launches 41st annual Primary Schools All-Island Athletics Championships

By May 04, 2023
(Standing) JAAA First Vice President the Hon. Ian Forbes, Acting Executive Director on INSPORTS Major Desmond Brown, (seated) Minister of Gender, Culture, Entertainment and Sport, the Hon. Olivia Babsy Grange and Devon Biscuits Brand Manager Sherene Bryan. (Standing) JAAA First Vice President the Hon. Ian Forbes, Acting Executive Director on INSPORTS Major Desmond Brown, (seated) Minister of Gender, Culture, Entertainment and Sport, the Hon. Olivia Babsy Grange and Devon Biscuits Brand Manager Sherene Bryan.

The Institute of Sports (INSPORTS) officially launched the 41st staging of the INSPORTS Primary Schools All-Island Athletics Championships in a ceremony held inside the Hospitality Room at the National Stadium in Kingston on Thursday.

The Championships, scheduled for May 4-27, will see competition among 130 schools with 6000 students in three regional championships leading up to the grand finale, the national championships.

“Today marks the start of what we have come to regard as our marquee sports event in Jamaica for juniors,” said Minister of Gender, Culture, Education and Sport, the Hon. Olivia “Babsy” Grange.

The Eastern Championships got underway on Thursday at Stadium East and will last until May 6.

The competition then moves to the GC Foster College of Physical Education and Sport for the Central Championships from May 8-10.

From there, the competition moves to St. Elizabeth Technical High School for the Western Championships between May 11 and May 13.

The National Championships, expected to showcase the best of the best in terms of Primary School athletics in the country, takes place from May 25-27 to decide the All-Island champion.

“It will be thrilling to see the youngsters out there competing. They look forward to it and are excited about it and we know we are looking at future world champions,” said Grange.

Devon Biscuits, who came on board as a major sponsor last year, will serve as title sponsors in 2023 and have committed $9 million to INSPORTS.

“We are happy to be on board,” said Brand Manager for Devon Biscuits, Sherene Bryan.

“We recognize the importance of encouraging, supporting and fostering Jamaica’s talent,” Bryan added before going into how Devon Biscuits came on board in 2022.

“We were made aware of the Championships two days before the meet began. I saw a social media post which was made by my dear friend, Trishana McGowan, and I reached out to her to ask if they had a sponsor. She then advised me that there was no sponsor on board. I then called her and requested the information for the directors of Insports and she provided it that opened the door for further conversations and now we’re here as the title sponsors.”

First Vice President of the Jamaica Administrative Athletics Association, the Hon. Ian Forbes, spoke on behalf of the association.

“41 years means that something right would have been happening. This is where the seeds of greatness are sewn,” Forbes said.

 

Bradley Jacks

Bradley Jacks is a budding journalist and an avid sports fan. His love of research and sports has led him to SportsMax.tv, a place where those passions work hand in hand to allow him to produce content.

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