Duffy claims Triathlon gold - Bermuda becomes smallest country to ever win Olympic gold

By Bradley Jacks July 27, 2021

Bermuda’s Flora Duffy inscribed both the names of herself and her country in the history books on Tuesday, after claiming a gold medal in the Women’s Triathlon.

Duffy finished the three-discipline event in a time of 1 hour, 55 minutes, and 36 seconds to win gold ahead of Georgia Taylor-Brown of Great Britain and Katie Zaferes from the USA.

“I can’t quite believe it. Olympic Champion,” Duffy remarked on social media, as she became the first person from Bermuda to win an Olympic gold medal.  The country had previously gotten on the medal podium through the exploits of Clarence Hill, a boxer who claimed bronze at the 1976 Olympics.  Duffy has taken them to the very top.

Her winning gold also interestingly makes Bermuda, with a population of approximately 62,000 people, the smallest country to ever win an Olympic gold medal.

“I think the whole of Bermuda is going crazy, that’s what makes it so special.”

 Duffy, who also won gold at the Commonwealth Games in 2018, went into the Tokyo Games as the favourite to win gold and delivered.

“It’s been a heck of a lot of pressure, I would never recommend being an Olympic favourite but it’s all worth it now.”

 

 

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