BREAKING NEWS! Muscle injury forces Fraser-Pryce out of Lausanne Diamond League 100m

By August 26, 2022

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has pulled out of the women´s 100m final due to a muscle sprain she experienced during her warm-up earlier this evening, meet organisers have announced.

The 35-year-old Fraser-Pryce was expected to line up against fellow Jamaicans Elaine Thompson-Herah, Shericka Jackson as well as Marie Josee Ta Lou in the 100m that would also have Americans Aleia Hobbs, Twanisha Terry and Tamari Davis.

The severity of the injury is unknown and it is still too early to tell whether she will be fit in time for the Diamond League final in Zurich in two weeks.

Fraser-Pryce subsequently confirmed her withdrawal on her Facebook account.

"Had some discomfort in my hamstring a couple of days now and unfortunately it doesn’t seem to be getting any better. As a precaution, my coach decided not to risk it at this point," she said. "Will have a few days to get some treatment before Brussels. I’m extremely disappointed that I won’t be able to compete tonight and I’m sure you all are as well. Thanks again for the support and encouragement. No matter how hard we prepare sometimes things just don’t go as planned. The last thing I want to do is gain an injury/ injure myself." 

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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