The Wanda Diamond League has released a detailed summary of which disciplines will be staged at which meetings during the 2024 season.

In 2024, the world’s best athletes will once again take the stage in athletics’ premier one-day series, competing at 15 meetings across four different continents.

Athletes will compete for points in their chosen discipline at the 14 series meetings between April and September, with the most successful qualifying for the Wanda Diamond League Final in Brussels on September 13th-14th.

The season begins in Xiamen on April 20th, with the men’s 100m, women’s 200m and a 100/110m hurdles double bill among the headline events. Each discipline will then be staged at least four and up to eight times on the Road to the Final, giving athletes from across the globe enough opportunities to earn points.

Two meetings will be held at a different location in 2024 due to stadium renovation works in their usual locations. The Meeting International Mohammed VI will move from Rabat to Marrakech, while the Wanda Diamond League Shanghai will take place in Suzhou.

The 14 series meetings will each take place in a two-hour TV world programme and will all stage at least 14 Diamond Disciplines. The Wanda Diamond League Final in Brussels will be the only meeting to feature every single discipline, with all 32 Diamond League champions crowned over the course of two days.

The season calendar and the allocation of disciplines remain subject to change.

A list of disciplines for each meeting will also be available under the 'programme and results' page on each individual meeting website.

As well as the Diamond Disciplines, each meeting may also include additional disciplines in their programme, in which athletes will not earn points on the Road to the Final.

The disciplines are as follows: 100m (M,W), 200m (M,W), 400m (M,W), 800m (M,W), 1500m/Mile (M,W), 3000m/5000m (M,W), 3000m Steeplechase (M,W), 110m Hurdles (M), 100m Hurdles (W), 400m Hurdles (M,W), High Jump (M,W), Pole Vault (M,W), Long Jump (M,W), Triple Jump (M,W), Shot Put (M,W), Discus Throw (M,W), Javelin Throw (M,W).

Jamaican 800m specialist Natoya Goule-Toppin rebounded from a disappointing outing at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest where she failed to reach the final by establishing a new national 800m record at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene, Oregon on Sunday.

Goule-Toppin finished third in the race behind American superstar Athing Mu, who rebounded from a bronze medal at the World Championships with an American Record 1:54.97 to win, and British World Championship silver medallist Keely Hodgkinson who ran a British Record 1:55.19 in second.

Goule-Toppin’s time in third was 1:55.96, bettering her own previous national record 1:56.15 set back in 2018.

Despite not taking the win on Sunday, the 32-year-old was delighted to end her season with that performance.

“I wanted the win because I know I have the ability to do it but I’m really happy with the third especially the national record,” Goule-Toppin said.

“I’ve been longing to run 1:55 and today was the day. The last one was the best one. It’s the last race of the season and I’m going home happy,” she added.

Goule-Toppin had been flirting with a sub 1:56 time for a number of years and she says the presence of competitors like Mu, Hodgkinson and World Champion Mary Moraa, who finished fourth, pushed her to this time.

“I kept saying once I stay with them I know I’ll run fast as well so when I saw 1:54, I knew I ran something fast but I didn’t know what it was. I was congratulating the girls then I looked back, saw my name and started rejoicing,” she said.

The 2018 Commonwealth Games bronze medallist also gave credit to the man above for her exploits on Sunday.

“I was patient and I prayed a lot. I said God, let your will be done and just help me to go out there and be strong and smart,” she said.

“All day I was talking to myself. It sounds crazy but I kept saying run through the line. Before I went out, my coach said the same thing,” she added.

 

Shericka Jackson will have to settle for a meet record instead of a world record after another dominating performance at the Diamond League finale in Eugene, Oregon on Sunday.

Fans were on world-record watch for the 200m world champion, who has run times of 21.41, 21.82 and 21.48, heading into Eugene but after winning the 100m Diamond League trophy in 10.70 on Saturday, Jackson seemingly didn’t have much left in her legs a day later but still sped to a meet record 21.57.

Florence Griffiths-Joyner world record of 21.34 set in 1988, survives for another year, but Jackson will undoubtedly challenge it again next season as the Olympic Games in Paris beckon.

Marie Josee Ta Lou ran a season-best 22.10 to finish second with Bahamian Anthonique Strachan finishing third in 22.16.

Tajay Gayle finished second in the long jump at the Diamond League finale in Eugene, Oregon on Sunday during a keenly contested event that saw the top-two tied in terms of distance achieved.

Gayle, the 2023 World Championships bronze medallist, soared out to a distance of 8.22m but had to settle for the runner-up slot to Switzerland’s Simon Erhammer, who also achieved a mark of 8.22 but won on the countback against the 2019 world champion.

Erhammer had additonal marks of 8.12m, 8.10 and 8.06m when compared to the Jamaican, who other best jumps were 8.08m and 8.06m.

Finishing third was Japan’s Yuki Hashioka, who jumped a season-best 8.15m.

Laquan Nairn of the Bahamas failed to break the 8m barrier, finishing seventh with a best of 7.27m.

 

Shanieka Ricketts was once again in personal best shape but it wasn’t enough to prevent Venezuelan World and Olympic Champion and world record holder, Yulimar Rojas, from claiming a third straight Diamond League trophy at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene on Saturday.

Ricketts produced an excellent series with distances of 14.69m, 14.79m and 14.69m in the first, second and fourth rounds before going out to 15.00m in her fifth-round effort. The 2019 World Championship silver medallist then produced a personal best 15.03m in the sixth and final round.

Rojas had fouls in her first two attempts before going out to 14.53m in her third round. After another foul in the fourth round, the superstar produced a world leading and meet record 15.35m in the fifth to secure victory.

Jamaica’s Kimberly Williams produced her best series of the season in third. Her best distance of 14.61m was her best jump since 2021. Her full series was as follows: 14.37m, 14.50m, 14.61m, 14.31m, 14.56m and 14.45m.

Kirani James produced his best performance of the season to claim his second straight Diamond League 400m title at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene on Saturday.

The 2011 World and 2012 Olympic Champion's winning time was 44.30, .14 ahead of American World Championship bronze medallist Quincy Hall in second. Another American, Vernon Norwood, ran 44.61 for third. Jamaica’s Rusheen McDonald was fifth in 45.10.

This was the fourth Diamond League title for the 31-year-old who also previously won in 2011, 2015 and 2022.

 

If anyone thought that Danielle Williams’ ‘surprise’ victory last week at the World Championships in Budapest was a fluke, she put all that to rest on Thursday when she stormed the victory against a quality field in the 100m hurdles at the Diamond League meeting in Zurich on Thursday.

Williams, the now two-time world champion, ran a clean race to win in 12.54s with a fast-finishing Alaysha Johnson and former world record holder Kendra Harrison, who ran 12.58 and 12.59, respectively for second and third.

Williams was ecstatic in victory. “It is a wonderful feeling coming out here as a World Champion. I mean, I have to give all the thanks for that. The race was a bit slower than I expected, but you know, I came out injury free, and with a win, so I can't complain,” she said.

“I haven't had much time to celebrate my big win in Budapest, it will probably the day after I finish my season. I am now onto my next meet, and I will try to celebrate after Eugene.”

Shaunae Miller-Uibo won her first professional race as a mother when she ran a season’s best 51.83 to win a 400m race at the Diamond League meeting in Zurich on Thursday. The 29-year-old two-time Olympic champion, who gave birth to her first child in April, ran in a non-Diamond League event for the first time this season, as she works her way back to competitive fitness.

She just managed to edge Annina Fahr of Switzerland who ran 51.97 for second place. Fahr’s compatriot Julia Niederberger finished third in 51.11.

Reflecting on the season so far, the Bahamian star stated, “It has been a long season, and obviously it would have come in handy for this to be the start of it - I just have to build for next season, and to get the body used to the shock again - and be ready for next season.

“Having become a mother has no comparison [to her greatest athletics achievement]. This is my greatest blessing, and I love that boy so much. I am going to go back into things, and I just want to make him proud. I want to get back up and, hopefully, whatever happens next year, I am doing it for him.”

As has become the norm in recent years, Yulimar Rojas dominated the triple jump competition as the Diamond League season resumed in Zurich, Switzerland on Thursday.

Fresh off her triumph at the World Championship triumph last week, the Venezuelan, a now four-time world champion, had jumps of 15.08 and 15.15, either of which would have comfortably secured victory against a stacked field that included world championship silver medalist Maryna Bekh-Romanchuk of the Ukraine and Cuba’s Leyanis Perez-Hernandez, the bronze medalist.

However, it was Jamaica’s Shanieka Ricketts who claimed the runner-up spot on this occasion with her jump of 14.78m. The Jamaican had a second-round jump of 14.62. The 14.78m followed on her third attempt.

Meanwhile, Liadagmis Povea of Cuba, sixth at World’s, took third place with her third-round effort of 14.73m.

Ricketts remarked that it was almost redemptive to be able to finish second in Zurich after missing out on a medal in Budapest.

"It is outside of my control in terms of what happens on the day so all I have to do is to control the things I can control, which is to jump the best I can on that day. Of course, I was disappointed to come out fourth again in Budapest but coming here and finishing on the second place, it is like icing on the cake," she said.

"I just hope to keep building on this. I tried to get a lot of rest and hydration in between the two events as it was extremely hot in Hungary so I have been really focusing on recovery to make sure I can still focus on the rest of the season. Out here, the surface felt a bit different - I think that track was much faster there and I had to make a few adjustments in terms of the runway. But in overal, I think it was a good competition. You do not need to focus on beating anybody, just beating yourself. Because once you do your best, you will be satisfied with the result."

Perez-Hernandez was fourth with 14.62 with Dominica’s Thea LaFond, who produced a new national record of 14.90 in Budapest, finishing fifth with an effort of 14.42m.

Bekh-Romanchuk had four fouls with her one legal jump being 14.37, which placed her sixth.

Shericka Jackson doesn’t expect to run a very fast 200m at the Diamond League meeting on Thursday but has hinted that she could take a crack at the world record in the remaining races she has this season.

The 29-year-old Jamaican successfully defended the title she won last year in Oregon while breaking her own championship record of 21.45. In Budapest, Jackson dominated the field to win in 21.41, the second fastest time in history.

Only Florence Griffith-Joyner’s 21.34 set back in 1988 has been faster than Jackson’s time. At Wednesday’s press conference, Jackson revealed she was disappointed at not getting closer to the world record but understood that the conditions were not ideal.

During the 200m final, the trailing win was a negligible 0.1m/s so when the moderator Colin Jackson asked whether the world record would have been in jeopardy had she had the maximum allowable wind of 2.0m/s, Jackson replied, “I didn’t know the wind at the time but when I going around and I saw it I was like, why couldn’t I get a little (1m/s) or something, but it’s give and take. Unfortunately, I didn’t get it on that day but I have three more 200s this season, so definitely.”

However, for Thursday, Jackson, who admitted that she is a bit ‘under the weather’, sees the 200m race as an opportunity to make a few adjustments to her race. “Coach and I have been working on some small details in the 200m. I think for the remainder of the season it’s all 200s. I just finished the world championships. I had a good training session yesterday (Tuesday), hopefully I have a good one today too, so it’s just to have some fun tomorrow.

“I don’t think tomorrow will be super-fast but I just want to have some fun and execute as best as I can.”

In Zurich, Jackson will line up against Bahamian champion Anthonique Strachan, Great Britain's Daryll Neita, the USA's Jenna Prandini, Tamara Clark, Twanisha Terry and Brittany Brown.

 

 

Zharnel Hughes had a premonition he would blitz the British 200m record in the specific time of 19.73 seconds ahead of doing so at Sunday’s sold-out London Diamond League meet.

The 28-year-old warmed up for next month’s World Championships in Budapest by impressively shaving 0.21 seconds off the previous national mark of 19.94, set by John Regis in 1993.

Hughes revealed post-race that he had earlier written his precise finishing time, which was only good enough for third place behind Noah Lyles and Letsile Tebogo, in a notebook.

His latest feat was witnessed by around 50,000 spectators at London Stadium and comes just a month after he broke Linford Christie’s 30-year-old 100m record when he ran 9.83 seconds in New York.

“It’s the exact time,” he said. “If you want to come around here, you can check it out.

“It depends how I am feeling and, if I know I am in good shape, I just write down a time and I use that time as a target.

“I don’t care about winning as long as I execute the plan that my coach wanted and we get the British record. I wanted to do it here on home soil and I did it.”

Hughes previously ran 19.77 with an illegal wind speed to claim the UK 200m title in Manchester earlier this month.

He burst out of the blocks on Sunday and pushed American world champion Lyles hard before his rival and Tebogo of Botswana moved clear on the home straight.

Hughes credited a “Kobe Bryant mentality” for his impressive recent results and warned he can become “much faster”.

“I’ve seen some little bits I can work on – and it’s exciting for me,” he said.

“I’m not pressured one bit. I am enjoying myself. I can get much faster.

“I spoke to you about that Kobe Bryant mentality. For me, I just wanted to go there and give it a great performance.”

Hughes broke away from his post-race interview to watch compatriot Dina Asher-Smith finish second in the women’s 100m, before Britain’s Jemma Reekie capped a stirring end to Sunday’s action by clinching 800m glory.

Former 200m world champion Asher-Smith crossed the line in 10.85 seconds, 0.10sec behind Marie-Josee Ta Lou of Ivory Coast, while compatriot Daryll Neita finished fourth.

“I am always disappointed not to win but this shows I am building,” said Asher-Smith.

“It is all about the end of August and Budapest, which isn’t a long way away, so I am excited.

“I managed to see the end of the men’s 200m and I am so pleased for Zharnel. British sprinting is doing so well.”

Zharnel Hughes smashed the 30-year-old British 200m record by clocking 19.73 seconds in front of a sell-out crowd at the London Diamond League.

The 28-year-old shaved 0.21 seconds off the previous mark of 19.94, set by John Regis at the World Championships in 1993, in finishing third at London Stadium.

His latest feat was witnessed by around 50,000 spectators and comes just a month after he broke Linford Christie’s 100m record when he ran 9.83 seconds in New York.

American world 200m champion Noah Lyles, who on Saturday backed Hughes for the British record, triumphed in 19.47 secs, while Letsile Tebogo of Botswana was second in 19.50 secs.

Hughes claimed he had earlier forecasted his record-breaking time.

“I did it again – I predicted it,” he said. “I wrote down that exact time this morning, at about 9.30am.

“I wanted to get the British record here on home soil and I did it.

“I don’t care about winning as long as I execute the time that my coach wanted and get the British record.”

Shericka Jackson humbled a crack field to win the 200m in Monaco on Thursday where triple jump phenom Jaydon Hibbert defeated some of the world’s best jumpers in his first ever Diamond League meeting.

Going up against USA champion Gabby Thomas, the world leader at 21.60 and the talented professional newcomer Julien Alfred as well former European champion Dina Asher Smith, Jackson found herself challenged coming into the home straight but called her on superior strength and speed to win in 21.86.

Alfred, in only her second meet as a professional, ran a smart 22.08 for second place. Asher-Smith was third in a season-best 22.23.

With a month to go before the World Championships in Budapest, the world champion was pleased with the performance.

“It was great for me today. Last time, I was second here, so to come here and take the win, it is really really good. I had three competitions in a week so it is a bit hard for me. One more coming up, it will be London,” said Jackson, who was not entirely happy with the first part of her race.

“I do not think that the curve was as good as I wanted but I managed to go until the finish so it was good. I have one more coming up so I am glad I finished this one healthy. I keep training and keep competing.

“I had a hard training session yesterday and still I was able to run 21 so that is good. I want to make sure I am on the top of my shape in Budapest. “

Anthonique Strachan of the Bahamas, who ran a lifetime best of 22.15 at the Diamond League Meeting in Rabat in May, clocked in at 22.40 to finish fourth. Thomas, who was among the leaders early and was expected to be in the mix down the home stretch but faded badly to finish in seventh in 22.67.

Hibbert, meanwhile, suffered his first loss in the triple jump this season despite producing a fantastic effort of 17.66M that was four centimetres short of Hugues Fabrice Zango’s winning effort of 17.70m. The man from Burkino Faso snatched the win on the very last jump of the competition.

 Yasser Mohammed Triki of Algeria, who held the lead briefly after a season-best third-round jump of 17.32m, had to settle for third place.

Ackeem Blake was third in the 100m running 10.00 behind Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala, who took the win in 9.92 over Letsile Tebogo, who clocked in at 9.93.

Yohan Blake was fourth in 10.01 with Kishane Thompson fifth in 10.04.

The meet will be remembered by another breathtaking performance from Faith Kipyegon, who smashed the world record for the one mile run. The Kenyan clocked 4:07.64 breaking the previous record of 4:12.33 set by Sifan Hassan in 2019.

Nia Ali took a close win over compatriot Kendra Harrison in the 100m hurdles. The mother of three clocked in a personal-best, world-leading and meet record time of 12.30, just 0.01 ahead Harrison, the former world record holder.

Another American Alaysha Johnson was third in 12.39.

The men’s 400m hurdles was a firecracker of a race billed as a clash between world-record holder Karsten Warholm and the reigning world champion Alison dos Santos, who was running his first hurdles race after rehabilitating from knee surgery.

And for the first 300m it was a battle before Warholm pulled away from the struggling Brazilian to win in a Diamond League and world-leading 46.51, a meet record. Dos Santos ran 47.66 with American CJ Allen close behind in 47.84.

 

 

Keely Hodgkinson lowered her personal best and British record with a brilliant performance in the 800 metres at the Diamond League meeting in Paris.

Hodgkinson followed the pacemaker before striking for home 300m from the line, eventually clocking a time of one minute 55.77 seconds, taking 0.11secs off her previous best set in winning Olympic silver in Tokyo.

“I am a little bit shocked that I ran so fast,” the 21-year-old said. “Paris next year, I will definitely be back.

“The weather was really nice, so warm. I had heard good things about the track. With this full stadium and the great crowd, it was amazing. I am so happy.

“Now the aim is to stay healthy, we still have to see, I want to keep running fast. The focus is on the summer, on Budapest (the World Championships).

“What is next with such a fast time early in the season? Well, I do not know. Hopefully I will run even faster.”

Hodgkinson’s record-breaking run came just half an hour after Norway’s Jakob Ingebrigtsen smashed the two-mile world record by more than four seconds.

Ingebrigtsen left the field trailing in his wake as he recorded a time of seven minutes, 54.10 seconds.

The previous mark was set by Daniel Komen in 1997, three years before Olympic 1,500 metre champion Ingebrigtsen was born.

Records continued to tumble as Kenya’s Faith Kipyegon set a new world’s best for the 5,000m, just a week after doing the same in the 1,500m in Florence.

Kipyegon produced a blistering last lap to pull away from Ethiopia’s Letesenbet Gidey and clock a time of 14:05.20, taking almost a second and a half off Gidey’s previous mark.

The ideal conditions helped produce another world record in the penultimate event of the evening, Ethiopia’s Lamecha Girma taking more than a second off the previous mark with a time of 7:52.11 in the men’s 3,000m steeplechase.

Keely Hodgkinson lowered her personal best and British record with a brilliant performance in the 800 metres at the Diamond League meeting in Paris.

Hodgkinson followed the pacemaker before striking for home 300m from the line, eventually clocking a time of one minute 55.77 seconds, taking 0.11secs off her previous best set in winning Olympic silver in Tokyo.

“I am a little bit shocked that I ran so fast,” the 21-year-old said. “Paris next year, I will definitely be back.

“The weather was really nice, so warm. I had heard good things about the track. With this full stadium and the great crowd, it was amazing. I am so happy.

“Now the aim is to stay healthy, we still have to see, I want to keep running fast. The focus is on the summer, on Budapest (the World Championships).

“What is next with such a fast time early in the season? Well, I do not know. Hopefully I will run even faster.”

Hodgkinson’s record-breaking run came just half an hour after Norway’s Jakob Ingebrigtsen smashed the two-mile world record by more than four seconds.

Ingebrigtsen left the field trailing in his wake as he recorded a time of seven minutes, 54.10 seconds.

The previous mark was set by Daniel Komen in 1997, three years before Olympic 1,500 metre champion Ingebrigtsen was born.

Records continued to tumble as Kenya’s Faith Kipyegon set a new world’s best for the 5,000m, just a week after doing the same in the 1,500m in Florence.

Kipyegon produced a blistering last lap to pull away from Ethiopia’s Letesenbet Gidey and clock a time of 14:05.20, taking almost a second and a half off Gidey’s previous mark.

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