Edwin Allen’s Delano Kennedy (45.27), Holmwood Technical’s Rickiann Russell (51.26) run personal bests to win 400m titles at ISSA Boys and Girls Championships

By March 30, 2023
Edwin Allen's Delano Kennedy and Holmwood Technical's Rickiann Russell ran personal bests to win their respective Class 1 400m finals. Edwin Allen's Delano Kennedy and Holmwood Technical's Rickiann Russell ran personal bests to win their respective Class 1 400m finals. Photosbybellamy

Edwin Allen’s Delano Kennedy brought the curtain down on Thursday’s day three of the ISSA Boys and Girls Championships with a gold medal in the Class 1 Boys 400m final at the National Stadium in Kingston.

The 19-year-old World Under-20 finalist secured nine points for the Clarendon-based school with a personal best 45.27 to win gold ahead of Jamaica College’s Malique Smith Band (45.74) and St. Elizabeth Technical’s Jasauna Dennis (45.87). Smith Band and Dennis also ran personal bests.

In the Girls Class 1 event, Holmwood Technical’s Rickiann Russell produced an excellent personal best 51.26, narrowly missing out on Sonita Sutherland’s record of 51.13 done in 2006, to win gold ahead of Hydel’s Oneika McAnuff (52.11) and Edwin Allen’s Kacian Powell (52.76).

KC’s Tahj-Marques White, the pre-race favourite in Class 2, made good on the promise he showed throughout the rounds to comfortably take gold in 47.73 ahead of JC’s Omary Robinson (48.49) and Calabar’s Nickecoy Bramwell (48.88).

Jody-Ann Daley of Hydel won the Girls Class 2 final in 53.61 ahead of Lacovia’s Sabrina Dockery (54.12) and St. Catherine’s fast-finishing Kitania Headley (54.13).

Calabar’s Christopher Ellis produced a mild upset in the Class 3 final when he ran 50.49 to defeat the KC pair Jordan Rehedul (50.67) and Eshanee Porter (50.69).

Hydel were once again winners in Class 3 through Nastassia Fletcher’s 53.99 effort. Excelsior’s Breana Brown ran 55.58 for second while Rhodes Hall’s Rhianna Lewis was third in 56.15.

In the field, Edwin Allen’s Dylan Logan threw 16.03m to win the Class 2 Boys shot put ahead of Petersfield’s Ranaldo Anderson (15.15m) and KC’s Jaeden Williams (15.05m).

The Class 1 Boys discus was won by JC’s Racquil Broderick with an impressive 62.94m ahead of Calabar’s World Under-20 shot put silver medallist Kobe Lawrence (60.41m) and Clarendon College’s Ricardo Hayles (60.15m).

KC’s Isaiah Patrick, who missed Champs last year through injury, produced a record 6969 points to win the boys decathlon ahead of JC’s Dorian Charles (6579 points) and Calabar’s Kevin Brooks (6202 points).

On the Girls’ side, Hydel’s Zavien Bernard cleared 1.77m for victory in the Class 3 high jump ahead of Edwin Allen’s Asia McKay (1.71m) and Rhode Hall’s Aaliyah Williams (1.68m).

St. Jago’s Jade-Ann Dawkins jumped 6.12m for gold in the Class 2 long jump ahead of St. Catherine High’s Rohanna Sudlow (5.90m) and Edwin Allen’s Deijanae Bruce (5.75m).

Immaculate Conception’s Ashley Barrett took the crown in Class 4 with 5.25m. St. Mary High’s Sackoya Palmer took second with 5.22m and Hydel’s Arrian Nelson third with 5.10m.

Edwin Allen took gold in the Girls Open javelin throw through Sheniela Williams’ 42.40m ahead of Hydel’s Natassia Burrell (41.82m) and Immaculate Conception’s Zoelle Jamel (39.70m).

As far as points go, Kingston College leads the Boys standings after 15 events scored with 124 points. Jamaica College finds themselves second with 121 while the top five is rounded out by Calabar with 70, St. Elizabeth Technical with 41 and St. Jago High with 32.

Hydel lead the standings on the Girls side after 16 events scored with 98 points, one more then defending champions Edwin Allen while the top five is completed by Holmwood Technical with 73.50, St. Jago High with 70 and Immaculate Conception with 44.

 

 

Bradley Jacks

Bradley Jacks is a budding journalist and an avid sports fan. His love of research and sports has led him to SportsMax.tv, a place where those passions work hand in hand to allow him to produce content.

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