World Championship 400m hurdles finalist and Jamaican national record holder Roshawn Clarke produced an upset in heat five of the men’s 400m at Saturday’s Camperdown Classic at the National Stadium in Kingston with a win over reigning World 400m champion Antonio Watson.

Swept Track Club’s Clarke, the current World U-20 record holder in the 400m hurdles, started the race in lane five while Racers Track Club’s Watson was in lane four.

It was a contrast in starts to the race for the two with Clarke going out hard over the first 300m and Watson going out in his usual reserved style.

The final 100m saw Clarke, who is still only 19 and doesn’t turn 20 until July, using his 400m hurdles strength to narrowly hold off a fast-finishing Watson.

In what was the first race of the season for both men, Clarke’s winning time was 46.05 while Watson ran 46.10 in second. Terry Thomas of Titans International was third in 46.97.

Watson is looking to build on a 2023 season that saw him run 44.22 to claim his maiden World 400m title in Budapest last August. Clarke also had a fantastic maiden World Championships. He produced a national record and world U-20 record 47.34 in the semi-finals of the 400m hurdles before finishing fourth in the final with a 48.07 effort.

Heat four saw two-time World Championship 100m finalist Oblique Seville of Racers Track Club produce a personal best 47.44 to open his season with a win. Titans International and Antigua & Barbuda’s Darion Skerritt ran a personal best 48.43 in second while Calabar’s Craig Prendergast, also hailing from Antigua & Barbuda, ran 48.49, also a personal best in third.

Heat three was won by Racers Track Club’s Kuron Griffith in a personal best 48.79 ahead of Swept Track Club’s Jalan Bennett (50.29) and Mico University College’s Quentin McLean (50.59).

Racers Track Club had the top three finishers in heat two. Guyana’s Shamar Horatio won in a personal best 49.02 ahead of Jamaican national U-20 100m record holder Bouwahjgie Nkrumie (49.73) and Adrian Taffe (50.27). Both Nkrumie and Taffe ran personal bests.

Elite Performance Track Club’s Waseem Williams ran a personal best 49.71 to win the first heat. Swept Track Club’s Junior Harris was second with a personal best 50.91 while York Castle’s Jerrain Hunter ran a personal best 51.74 in third.

The women’s invitational 400m final was won by Elite Performance’s Kerrica Hill in a personal best 56.26 ahead of Ferncourt’s Alliea Whitter (59.36) and Serena Richard of Legacy Athletics (59.84).

 

 

 The World Athletics Continental Tour Silver event, Racers Grand Prix will host its 2024 staging on Saturday, June 1 at the National Stadium.

Known globally as Jamaica’s foremost track and field meet credited with showcasing many of Jamaica’s most decorated athletes, Racers Grand Prix promises an exhilarating three-hour demonstration of athletic excellence.

As the well-supported meet returns to its pride and place on the sporting calendar for the second year post-pandemic, Racers Grand Prix CEO Devon Blake is prepared to raise the engagement for fans of the sport.

“As usual we will have a star-studded lineup of international and Jamaican athletes. A major focus for this year's meet will be our fan engagement activities. We are working on new ways for attendees to immerse themselves in the Grand Prix experience. We are proud to announce that for the first time this year, fans of track and field will be able to sign up online for free tickets to the meet,” Blake shared

 While deliberations continue to determine the meet lineup for 2024, Blake is keen to highlight the Racers Track Club members to watch at this year’s meet.

 “It's too early to have any confirmed athletes who are not part of Racers Track Club. However, we are expecting exemplary things from Oblique Seville (who leads the new generation of 100m athletes), Antonio Watson (Jamaica's first World Championship gold medallist in over 40 years), and Zharnel Hughes (British 100m and 200m record holder),” Blake added.

 Racers Grand Prix was conceived by Chairman Glen Mills and launched in 2016. Today it stands as a premier Track and Field Meet showcasing top talents from the Racers Track and Field Club, Jamaica and around the world. The event plays a pivotal role in developing Jamaica's athletics and the Racers Track and Field Club.

 Racer’s Grand Prix Organizing Committee Chairman, Glen Mills is particularly excited to facilitate the development of local talent at this year’s meet as a precursor to the Olympics.

“This is an Olympic year and the Racers Grand Prix offers our Jamaican athletes the perfect opportunity to measure themselves against the best in the world in front of their home fans and also assess their progress in preparation for the Olympics,” Glen Mills commented.

Oblique Seville continued his good form Sunday post last month's 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest when he finished second in the 100m at the Boris Hanžeković Memorial in Zagreb, Croatia.

Seville, who clocked 10.88s for fourth place in the 100m final in Budapest, clocked 10.04 finishing just behind Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala, who won in 9.94.

Italy’s Lamont Marcell Jacobs finished third in 10.08.

Jamaican 100m champion Rohan Watson was seventh in 10.32.

 

As the 2023 track and field season draws near to a close, Caribbean athletes continued to showcase their excellence at the in Europe where sprinters Natasha Morrison and Oblique Seville emerged victorious in the 100m dash while Rusheen McDonald topped the podium in the 400m dash at the 2023 Palio Citta' della Quercia Rovereto in Italy on Wednesday.

During the entertaining meet, Shanieka Ricketts also produced a near-season-best effort to win the women’s triple jump over fellow Caribbean star Thea LaFond.

Morrison, a member of Jamaica’s silver medal winning 4x100m relay at the recent World Athletics Championships in Budapest, won a closely contested 100m dash in a new meet record of 11.00. She managed to outlast Americans Twanisha Terry, who clocked in at 11.06 for second place with Gina Bass of Gambia close behind in 11.08.

Briana Williams was fifth in 11.22.

Seville won the men’s equivalent in 10 seconds flat over Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala, who ran 10.15. Mouhamadou Fall of France was a close third in 10.22. Michael Campbell finished fourth in 10.29 with Jamaican champion Rohan Watson farther back in seventh in a time of 10.45.

Rusheen McDonald, the fastest Jamaica in the 400m this year at 44.03, won the 400m in a close finish with Germany’s Manuel Sanders. The Jamaican ran 45.46 while just managing to hold off the German, who a metre behind in 45.53.

South Africa’s Zakithi Nene was not far behind in third in 45.69.

The women’s triple jump featured Ricketts and LaFond, who produced season bests 14.93 and 14.90 for were fourth and fifth, respectively, at the World Athletics Championships in Budapest. They went at it again in Rovereto with the Jamaican once again coming out ahead.

She produced a jump of 14.92m to take victory with the Dominican darling finishing second with a 14.67m effort.

The two women were miles ahead of the rest of the field as Dovile Kilty finished third with a season-best 14.04m.

Amoi Brown ran 12.85 to finish second in the 100m hurdles. Ireland’s Sarah Lavin claimed victory in 12.76 with Taliyah Brooks of the USA taking third in 12.91.

 

 

 

Reigning double-sprint Olympic Champion, Elaine Thompson-Herah continues to show signs of a potential return to top form in 2024 after a season’s best 10.92 to win at the Gala dei Castelli, a World Athletics Continental Tour Silver meet in Bellinzola, Switzerland on Monday.

Thompson-Herah, who has endured a season riddled with injuries, took the win ahead of Great Britain’s Imani Lansiquot (10.99), her first time below 11 seconds, and Gambia’s Gina Bass (11.12).

This was only Thompson-Herah’s second 100m race since finishing fifth at the Jamaican trials in July. She ran 11.00 for second at the Zurich Diamond League on August 31.

The 31-year-old was a member of Jamaica’s silver medal 4x100m team at the recently concluded World Championships in Budapest where she ran in the heats.

On the men’s side, Oblique Seville ran 10.01 to take the win ahead of Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala (10.04) and South Africa’s Akani Simbine (10.12).

Seville narrowly missed out on a medal in Budapest, finishing fourth in 9.88, the same time credited to bronze medallist, Zharnel Hughes.

Another 100m finalist in Budapest, Ryiem Forde, was seventh in 10.28 on Monday.

Natoya Goule-Toppin rebounded from a sub-par showing in Budapest to take the 800m in 1:57.53, a new meet record.

The USA’s Addison Wiley ran a personal best 1:57.64 in second while Switzerland’s Audrey Werro ran a national record 1:58.13 in third.

Puerto Rico’s Jasmine Camacho-Quinn, who was upset by Danielle Williams in Budapest, came out on top with a meet record 12.56 in the 100m hurdles. The Netherlands’ Nadine Visser ran a season’s best 12.61 in second while the USA’s Nia Ali ran 12.63 in third.

Shashalee Forbes, a member of Jamaica's silver-medal winning 4x100m team in Budapest, ran 22.74 for second in the 200m behind the USA's Tamara Clark (22.64). Italy's Dalia Kaddari ran 22.86 for third.

Orlando Bennett ran 13.40 for third in the men’s 110m hurdles won by Switzerland’s Jason Joseph in 13.18. Senegal’s Louis Francois Mendy was second in 13.29.

In the field, 2019 World Championship silver-medallist Fedrick Dacres threw 66.19m for third in the discus behind World Champion Daniel Stahl (67.24m) and Kristjan Ceh (67.15m).

In a stirring battle for the 100m gold medal at the end of day two of the 2023 World Athletics Championships on Sunday, the USA’s Noah Lyles emerged victorious in 9.83 but it was not close to the 9.65 that he had predicted.

In what was one of the closest finishes in years, the battle for the other two medals came down to mere milliseconds as Letsile Tebogo, Zharnel Hughes and Oblique Seville were each credited with the same time of 9.88. Tebogo’s time was a new national record for Botswana.

Seville lost the bronze medal by 0.003 seconds as Tebogo was timed in 9.873, Hughes in 9.874 and Seville 9.877.

Christian Coleman, the 2019 champion, was fourth in 9.92.

Jamaica’s Ryiem Forde, in his first global final, was eighth in 10.08.

Though disappointed with the outcome, Seville thought he did his best under the circumstances but admitted to crucial errors late in the race. “I think it was an excellent performance up to the last part of my race which wasn’t that good but as my coach always told me it’s milliseconds that separates us  and I think  that was what separated me from a bronze medal,” he said.

He explained further the mistakes he made in the race.

“Well, everyone was close at the line and I think I should have stayed with my technique a little bit more because I dipped very early, which actually cost me.”

After three electrifying semi-final rounds of the 100m on Sunday, Oblique Seville announced himself as a possible contender for the gold medal in the blue-ribbon sprint at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary on Sunday.

Seville will be joined by compatriot Ryiem Forde in the event that will crown a new champion this year, as defending champion  Fred Kerley was eliminated after finishing third in Seville’s heat.

Seville exploded from the blocks in the last of the three heats and took control mid-race before easing across the line in 9.90 and looking like he had much more in the tank. Letsile Tebogo of Botswana clinched the other automatic qualifying spot when he finished second on 9.98.

The big surprise was Kerley, the 2022 champion, who looked out of sorts while finishing third in 10.02 and will take no further part in the competition.

Noah Lyles, the brash American, who said he was going to win the gold medal in 9.65, stormed to victory in his semi-final heat in 9.87 punching the air as he crossed the line as he booked his place in the final. Japan’s Abdul Sani-Brown ran a personal best 9.97 to book his spot.

Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala who was third in 10.01 and who was on the bubble and dependent on how the other heats unfolded, celebrated his spot in the final as his time was 0.01 faster than Kerley’s.

Jamaica’s champion Rohan Watson missed out on a berth in the final when he finished fifth in the heat in 10.07.

Christian Coleman raced to a time of 9.88 to win the second semi-final heat comfortably ahead of Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes, who clocked 9.93 for second place. Forde ran a personal best 9.95 for third place and a spot in the final.

 

 

There were no surprises, as Jamaica’s trio of Oblique Seville, Rohan Watson and Ryiem Forde all secured their spot in the men’s 100 metres semi-finals, along with Guyana’s Emanuel Archibald, after all safely navigated their respective heats on the opening day of the World Athletic Championships in Budapest, Hungary, on Saturday.

After a series of delays and false starts, Seville, who just missed the podium in Eugene, ran a comfortable race from lane seven in heat five and stopped the clock in 9.86s, which equalled his personal best.

The 22-year-old, who was the fastest qualifier across all seven heats, won ahead of one of the gold medal favourites in American Fred Kerley, who cruised to 9.99s. Belize’s Brandon Jones, who was also in the heat, placed seventh in 10.95s.

Seville pointed out that he had no concerns about the delays, as the experience gained over the years prepared him for what transpired.

“It is something that happens often in Jamaica, so it actually prepared me for now on the big stage. It was just for me to go out and execute and run a good time, I didn’t expect it but my coach did because he told me I am in the best of shape, so it was just for me to go out there and do what I have to,” Seville said shortly after performance.

Jamaica’s national championship Watson recovered from a slight stumble at the start to place second in the following heat.

He clocked 10.11s, behind Japan’s Sani Brown, who clocked a season’s best 10.07s, with Italy’s Lamonth Jacobs, also finishing in a season’s best 10.15s, as he continues to work his way back to form.

British Virgin Islands Rikkoi Brathwaite (10.18s) and Terrence Jones (10.32s) of Bahamas, fifth and sixth respectively in the same heat.

Earlier, another Jamaican Forde, also comfortably secured his spot, clocking 10.01s for second behind Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes, who clocked a flat 10.00s in winning heat one.

Favourite Noah Lyles was the second fastest in qualifying, as he stormed to 9.95s in heat two, with the powerfully built Kenyan Ferdinand Omanyala (9.97s), joining him.

Meanwhile, Antigua and Barbuda’s Cejhae Greene (10.23s) missed out on the semi-finals after placing sixth in heat four, which was won by Botswana’s Letsile Tebogo in 10.11s.

Guyana’s Emanuel Archibald, who ran earlier this morning to progress to the heats, successfully went one step further as he booked his spot in the semi-finals.

Archibald was given joint third with a time of 10.20s, along with Japan’s Hiroki Yanagita, behind South Africa’s Akani Simbine, who won the final heat in 9.97s, just edging American Cristian Coleman (9.98s).

The semi-finals are scheduled for Sunday at 9:35am Jamaica time.

 

You can catch live action of the 2023 World Athletic Championships by downloading the Sportsmax App.

Not since Paris in 2003 has the men’s 100m title been claimed by a sprinter from outside the US or Jamaica. Could 2023 in Budapest be the time and place for someone to follow in the footsteps of Kim Collins by bringing an end to the 20-year-old duopoly?

The event appears to be as open as it was in the French capital two decades ago, when Collins put St Kitts and Nevis on the global track and field map. No-one stands out as a clear favourite, though Fred Kerley perhaps ought to be considered the main contender.

The 6ft 3in Texan is the reigning champion, having led a US medal sweep on home soil in Oregon last year ahead of Marvin Bracy-Williams and Trayvon Bromell. US sprinters have won the last three golds and Kerley will lead the starred and striped challenge in Budapest, supported this time by Cravont Charleston, the 2019 world champion Christian Coleman and two-time world 200m champion Noah Lyles, a potential ‘surprise’ packet.

Kerley has contested just five 100m races this season, two of them in the Seiko Golden Grand Prix in Yokohama in May, where he clocked a season’s best of 9.88. He registered comfortable victories on the Diamond League circuit in Rabat and Florence, both in 9.94, but was edged out in a tight finish in Silesia on 16 July, South Africa’s Akani Simbine taking the win in 9.97 with Kerley and Cameroon’s Emmanuel Eseme clocking 9.98 in second and third, and the newly-crowned US champion Charleston fourth in 9.99.

Ahead of Kerley on the 2023 world list stand two potential challengers in Britain’s Zharnel Hughes (9.83) and Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala (9.84).

When Hughes, a qualified pilot, flew to his 9.83 clocking in New York on 24 June, he sliced 0.04 off the ancient national record held by the only British sprinter to have claimed the world 100m title, Linford Christie, who triumphed in Stuttgart 30 years ago. Should he strike gold in Budapest, the native Anguillan would make it five wins in the event for his Jamaican coach, Glen Mills, the sprint guru who guided Usain Bolt to victory in 2009, 2013 and 2015, and also Yohan Blake in 2011.

“Obviously people are going to target the time I’ve run,” said Hughes, who won the European 200m title last year, “but I don’t put pressure on myself. That’s when things can go topsy turvy.”

Hughes, who false started in the Olympic final two years ago, has no other official sub-10 to his name in 2023, although he won the British title in 10.03 in monsoon conditions and smashed John Regis’ 30-year-old national 200m record with 19.73 for third place behind Lyles (19.47) and Botswana’s Letsile Tebogo (19.50) in the London Diamond League meeting on 23 July.

Omanyala is the only man who has dipped under 9.90 twice this year, the Commonwealth champion backing up his 9.84 from the Kip Keino Classic in May with 9.85 in the Kenyan trials on 8 July. The former rugby player has yet to make a global 100m final but has been a consistent performer on the Diamond League stage, placing third in Rabat, second in Florence and Paris and first in Monaco, and is not lacking in confidence.

Simbine’s victory ahead of Kerley in Silesia will have raised his hopes of finally making a global podium – and winning the race to become Africa’s first medal winner in the event. The 29-year-old South African has long been the ‘nearly’ man of the 100m: fifth in London in 2017, fourth in Doha in 2019 and fifth in Oregon last year, as well as fourth and fifth in the last two Olympic finals. With four successive wins behind him (in Kladno, Ostrava, Stockholm and Silesia), he heads to Hungary with serious momentum.

The African challenge promises to be fierce. Like Simbine and Omanyala, Eseme and Tebogo have also notched top three finishes on the Diamond League circuit, while Simbine’s South African teammate Shaun Maswanganyi has a 9.91 clocking to his name.

A place on the podium might not be beyond the scope of all four US sprinters – including Lyles, who beat Omanyala and Tebogo to win the 100m at the Paris Diamond League and was recovering from Covid when he took third place in the US Championships. He boasts a PB of 9.86.

A new kid on the senior international block, the 20-year-old Bahamian Terrence Jones who won the NCAA indoor 60m title in March, has run 9.91.

The Jamaican challenge will be led by Oblique Seville, who finished fourth in Oregon last year, and the emerging Rohan Watson, who started the year with a best of 10.41 but won the Jamaican title in 9.91. Ackeem Blake stands fourth on the world list with 9.89 but, having placed fourth in the trials, is on the entry list as a reserve.

The sprint events were always anticipated to be the highlight of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA)/Puma National Junior and Senior Championships, and they are certainly living up to those expectations, as there were a number of explosive performances, particularly in the men’s 100m on Thursday’s opening day of action at the National Stadium.

Aside from a few sub-10 second and personal best clocking, one of the biggest shockers of the night came when 2011 World Champion Yohan Blake –who many hoped would have rolled back the clock and produce a top performance –false-started and will now have to possibly turn his attention to the 200m, if he is to make the country's team to the World Athletics Championships next month.

The 33-year-old Blake was the defending national champion as he produced a timely sub-10 clocking in victory at last year's championships.

Still, the moderate turn out in the grandstand didn't leave disappointed, as MVP's Kishane Thompson and Kadrian Goldson of GC Foster College, announced themselves in a big way with massive personal best times of 9.91s and 9.94s respectively to lead all qualifiers into the semi-finals. 

Thompson, 22, running in heat one, surprised favourite Ackeem Blake of Titans Track Club, storming to his new lifetime best in a 0.6 metres per second wind reading, as he lowered his previous best of 10.21s set last year. Blake, who was ahead of the pack at one point, seemingly eased up off the accelerator too early and settled for second in a flat 10.00s, with Ryiem Forde of Adidas, taking third in a new personal best 10.01s.

Meanwhile, Goldson, running in heat three, maintained his focus despite two early false starts by Rasheed Foster of Cameron Blazers and Yohan Blake of Titans Track Club.

The 26-year-old Goldson powered his way to his new lifetime best in a 0.7 metres per second reading, to lower his previous best of 10.08s achieved last month. MVP’s Rohan Thompson also had a new personal best 9.98s in second, with Julian Forte (10.10s) of Elite Performance, in third.

Prior to that, another favourite for the national title Oblique Seville, cruised to a flat 10.00s while smiling all the way to the line in a 0.3 metres per second reading. That just about signals that the Glenn Mills Racers Track Club charge is fit and healthy to turn back all challengers at the decisive end of the event on Friday.

MVP’s Ramone Barnswell with a personal best 10.13s, Tyquendo Tracey (10.22s) of Swept Track Club, Nigel Ellis (10.07s) of Elite Performance, Michael Campbell (10.10s) of MVP and Bouwahjgie Nkrumie (10.21s) of Dr. Speed, will also line up in the semi-finals on Friday.

On the women’s side of action, there were no surprises as the inform Shericka Jackson of MVP seems set to retain her title, after easing to 10.99s in a 0.0 wind reading, following what was one of her most efficient starts in recent times. Her MVP teammate Jonielle Smith (11.19s) and Briana Williams (11.19s) of Titans Track Club, were second and third respectively.

It was not so smooth for two-time Olympic Games sprint double champion Elaine Thompson-Herah, who is still working her way back to form, as she had to dig deep to win her heat in 11.12s in a 0.3 metres per second reading. The New Era Track Club representative held off Ashanti Moore (11.15s) of Adidas and the fast-finishing Shockoria Wallace (11.19s) of MVP.

National Under-20 record holder Alana Reid (11.14s) of Nike, Sprintec’s Remona Burchell (11.20s), Natasha Morrison (11.00s) of MVP and another Sprintec representative Shashalee Forbes (11.09s), also safely progressed to the semi-finals.

It is said that the words coaches say to their athletes, and the words athletes say to themselves, greatly influence their performance. If that is anything to go by, then rising sprint star Ackeem Blake is set for another big showing at the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) National Junior and Senior Championships –barring any mishaps.

The four-day Championships which is being used to select Jamaica's senior team to the World Athletics Championships, as well as teams to a few youth events, get is set to start on Thursday at the National Stadium.

Blake, has been the pacesetter in terms of his steady display of form so far this season, having dipped below 10 seconds in four of seven 100-metre races to date, which just about signals his readiness to challenge for a spot on the team to the World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary, next month.

The 21-year-old, who opened his season with times of 10.05s, 9.93s and 9.99s in April, gradually upped the ante on May 21, when he clocked a wind-aided 9.87s in Bermuda, which may not have counted where achievements are concerned, but would have done his confidence a world of good.

And, so it did. He returned a week later and produced another impressive run, clocking a new personal best 9.89s at the USATF LA Grand Prix, in California. That time bettered his previous best of 9.93s that came at last year's National Championship.

However, his most recent performances at the backend of June, a 10.07s-clocking at the Budapest Quest meet inside the National Stadium, followed by 9.93s at the USATF New York Grand Prix, Blake said fell below his coach's expectations where execution is concerned.

"I never executed those races how my coach wanted, so we just have to go back to the drawing board and put in the work," Blake said in a recent interview during the National Championships launch.

A statement like that speaks volumes of the high standard both Blake and his Titans Track Club coach have set for themselves and, understandably so, as the quality of Jamaica's male sprinting took a nosedive since the retirement of the incomparable Usain Bolt in 2017.

But Blake, a former Merlene Ottey High standout is among those leading the revival having made it to the semi-finals at the World Championships in Eugene, Oregon in his first full season in the senior professional ranks.

With that experience under his belt, there is no limit to what Blake could possibly achieve this year and beyond, provided he stays fit and healthy. 

"I gained a lot of experience last year which was good for me so now I am just using that experience to be the best that I can be. So, I'm good, I am more relaxed and just having fun," Blake declared.

Given the fact that he placed third at last year's National Championship behind 2011 World Champion and the second fastest man alive, Yohan Blake, who is also his training partner, the Titans young star knows that taking the national title won't be easy.

Yohan Blake the reigning national champion, as well as Oblique Seville, who has been a bit low-key with a season's best 9.95 seconds and other top contenders –possibly Julian Forte, Bouwahjgie Nkrumie and DeAndre Daley –are expected to face the starter for Friday's final, and it is anybody's guess who will reign supreme.

Young Blake, being a man of few words, is intent on letting his performance do the talking on the track, which is when his true personality comes to light.

"Coach is just working on my start so I can go out there to have fun and do what I have to do that's it. So, I'm not talking (about expectations) right now, I am just going out there and time will tell," he ended.

Oblique Seville and Ackeem Blake have been withdrawn from this weekend’s Racers Grand Prix at the National Stadium in Kingston.

Fresh off his lifetime best 9.89 while defeating Coleman at last weekend’s LA Grand Prix there was much anticipation for the rematch between Blake and the American this coming Saturday.

Blake ran a personal best of 9.89 to defeat Coleman (9.91) but according to his coaches, the 22-year-old sprinter was a bit sore after that run and only managed to resume training on Wednesday. As a result, they have taken a decision to withdraw him from the meet as a precaution.

Seville, reliable sources have said, suffered a hamstring injury in training and won’t run on Saturday. Calls to his coach Glen Mills went unanswered but Seville’s name was not among the remaining names on the men’s 100m start list for Saturday’s meet.

Notwithstanding their absence, there is still plenty to look forward to at the meet that will feature World 200m champions Noah Lyles and Shericka Jackson, Zharnel Hughes and Wayde van Niekerk.

There is also a potential mouth-watering clash between the 2022 100m hurdles world champion and world record holder Tobi Amusan of Nigeria and teenage sensation, World U20 Champion and U20 world record holder Kerrica Hill.

Commonwealth Games champion Rasheed Broadbell and Olympic Champion will go head-to-head in the men’s sprint hurdles.

Jamaica’s Sprint Legend Usain Bolt says he remains eager to play another impactful role in track and field’s growth and, as such, is awaiting a position from World Athletics to hit the ground running.

The 36-year-old, who shot to fame by winning eight Olympic titles and 11 World Championships gold medals, while breaking records in the 100m, 200m and 4x100m, believes the track and field has experienced somewhat of a decline since his retirement in 2017, but stands ready to assist in the sport’s revival, if asked to do so.

“I’m still waiting on a position from (World Athletics), I’ve reached out to them and let them know I would love to make a bigger impact in sports, as long as they want me to,” Bolt said in an interview with Reuters.

“We’ve been in talks, but we’ll have to wait and see what comes around,” the global phenom and one of Jamaica’s most recognizable figures, added.

Bolt is aware that his personality was a vital ingredient in the sport’s success during his era but pointed out to indications that athletes like US sprinter Noah Lyles, might be starting to fill the charisma gap.

“It’s going to be a process. After me, it kind of went down because of who I was as a person and how big my personality was,” the iconic sprinter shared. 

“But I think over time, it will be better. I think young athletes are coming up and I see a few personalities that are needed in sport; hopefully, in the upcoming years, it will change. Hopefully, I can play a part and help the sport to grow,” Bolt stated.

While there was some disappointment about the crowd turnout at last year’s World Championships in Eugene, Oregon, Bolt is of the view that next year’s Olympic Games in Paris, France, could be a special moment for the sport.

“Sometimes, it’s all about where it is. America is not the biggest track and field place,” Bolt said.

“I think Paris will be big because it’s accessible and I know Paris always has a good team and good athletes over the years. So, I look forward to that,” he noted.

After a decade of Bolt-inspired global dominance, Jamaica’s men have failed to win a single track gold medal at the last two World Championships.

However, with rising young sprinters Oblique Seville and Ackeem Blake both showing considerable promise of success, Bolt believes there is a good platform for that medal drought to be broken at this year’s championships in Budapest, Hungary.

“Last year, Seville came fourth (in the 100m), so I was very impressed. Also now, there’s a young kid, Ackeem Blake, who is also stepping up. So, I think that’s a good start,” the 11-time world champion said.

“Hopefully, these two will motivate other youngsters to want to step up and want to train harder and dedicate themselves,” he reasoned.

On that note, Bolt said he would be keeping a close eye on compatriot Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce at the World Championships in August.

Fraser-Pryce, also 36, who has led Jamaica’s dominance in the women’s sprints, will be seeking a record-extending sixth world 100m title in Hungary, 14 years after making her debut in the global showpiece of track and field.

“I follow Shelly a lot because we came through the same era, so to see her continue sprinting and coming back from having a child, that’s impressive,” said Bolt.

Oblique Seville ran a season-best 100m and Shericka Jackson, an impressive 200m season-opener at the May 20 All Comers Meet at the National Stadium in Kingston on Saturday.

The 2022 World Championships 100m finalist, who ran a wind-legal 9.95 at the Miramar Invitational on April 8, sped to a 9.94 clocking while shutting down over the last 15-metres to win the time trial.

Rohan Watson, whose previous best this season, was 10.32, shaved a massive 0.20s to be second overall after winning his section in 10.12.

Veteran sprinter Yohan Blake, the second-fastest man of all time, and who was second in Seville’s section in 10.15, was third overall.

The Women’s 100m provided a thrilling encounter between Olympic relay gold medallist Briana Williams, returning from a hamstring injury and Carifta U20 champion Alana Reid.

Williams exploded from the blocks and held a seemingly comfortable lead over Reid, who stormed back late to win in 11.16 over the 2018 World U20 champion, who ran a season-best 11.20.

Tia Clayton was third in 11.36.

The 200m races were no less entertaining as reigning world champion Shericka Jackson, in her first 200m of the season, cruised to victory in 22.25.

In her wake was Olympic 400m finalist Stephenie-Ann McPherson who ran 23.38 and Germany’s Tatiana Pinto, who was third in 23.74.

Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes was in a class of his own in the 200m, winning in a season-best 20.18.

Jazeel Murphy, who won Section six of seven, was second overall with a time of 20.76. Nigel Ellis finished second to Murphy, was third overall in 20.80.

Stacey-Ann Williams showed her class in the 400m winning in 51.43 while repelling the early challenge of Ashley Williams, who finished second in 52.11.

Shana Kaye Anderson was third overall in 54.27.

Olympic 400m hurdles bronze medallist Kaliese Carter, who at 36, is making a comeback, ran a season-best 54.64 for fourth place.

In the field, Traves Smikle won the discus throw with 66.05m.

Kai Chang was second with his best throw of 62.78m.

Racquil Broderick threw 57.17m for third place.

In the high jump, Christoff Bryan cleared 2.20m for the win over Lushane Wilson 2.15m and Raymond Richards, who cleared 2.10m.

Oblique Seville topped a quality field in the 100m at the Adidas Atlanta City Games at Centennial Olympic Park on Saturday where Trinidad and Tobago’s Jereem Richards won his 150m dash and Ashanti Moore ran a new personal best in the Women’s 100m.

Seville, who earlier this year, expressed a desire to run faster than his lifetime best of 9.86, clocked 9.99 to win the blue-ribbon sprint in a close race with South Africa’s Akani Simbine and Great Britain’s Zharnel Hughes.

Simbini and Hughes were awarded a time of 10.01, but the South African crossed the line in 10.005 to Hughes’ 10.010.

Ryiem Forde of Jamaica ran a personal best of 10.07 for fourth.

The Women’s race was not also close as Aleia Hobbs ran 10.99, a mere 0.003 ahead of compatriot Mikiah Brisco’s 11.02. Jamaica’s Ashanti Moore replicated her personal best from the preliminary round with another 11.10 clocking for third place.

It was the second lifetime best for Moore in as many weeks as she ran a personal best 22.49 over 200m a week ago.

Richards won the 150m ‘B’ final in a time of 14.83 over the USA duo of Chris Royster (14.89) and Brandon Carnes (14.97).

They were not nearly as fast as the 14.56 run by 200m World Champion Noah Lyles in his 150m race. Teen prodigy Erriyon Knighton was second in 14.85 while Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala was third in 14.89, just ahead of Jamaica’s Antonio Watson’s 14.93.

Meanwhile, Jamaica’s Remona Burchell finished second in the Women’s 150m ‘B’ race.

The three-time NCAA champion clocked 16.73 to finish behind Angie Angus, who crossed the finish line in 16.58. Lauren Ann Williams was third in 16.86.

Tamari Davis won the ‘A’ final in a lifetime best 16.44 with Great Britain’s Daryl Neita finishing a close second in her lifetime best of 16.48. Gabby Thomas also achieved a personal best of 16.50 to finish third.

Veteran middle distance runner Natoya Goule lost out on another battle with long-time rival and friend Ajee Wilson in the 600m run. The American emerged a comfortable winner in 1:27.00 to Goule’s 1:28.18.

Sammy Watson was third in 1:28.49.

Bryce Hoppel won the men’s event in 1:17.13 over compatriot Kameron Jones (1:17.43) with Jamaica’s Rajay Hamilton clocking 1:17.94 to finish in third place.

 

 

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