Georginio Wijnaldum has joined Roma's squad for a training camp in Portugal after missing the World Cup with a broken leg.

Wijnaldum joined Roma on a season-long loan in August after spending a single campaign with Ligue 1 champions Paris Saint-Germain.

The Netherlands international played just 11 minutes for the Giallorossi before breaking his right leg in training later that month, causing him to miss the Oranje's trip to Qatar – which ended with a penalty shoot-out defeat to Argentina in the last eight.

However, Wijnaldum will hope to play a significant role in the second half of the season after being seen out on the pitch at Roma's Trigoria training ground on Thursday.

Wijnaldum then joined Jose Mourinho's squad in travelling to Portugal for a training camp and three friendly matches – against Cadiz, Casa Pia and RKC Waalwijk.

Roma sit seventh in Serie A, three points adrift of a top-four place, ahead of the league's resumption on January 4.

Netherlands defender Daley Blind has expressed frustration at news of his likely January exit from Ajax quickly becoming common knowledge.

Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf reported on Wednesday how Blind has been given permission to leave the Amsterdam giants on a free transfer.

The club are said to have agreed to smooth the path for his exit because of his long service, which has come either side of a four-year stint with Manchester United.

Blind, 32, is the son of Ajax legend Danny Blind, and began his career in the Ajax youth ranks before emerging into the first team.

After his Old Trafford stay, he returned to Ajax in July 2018. His deal was due to expire at the end of this season, but the 99-cap international now looks poised to depart sooner.

Reports have linked Blind with Belgian club Royal Antwerp, whose director of football Marc Overmars previously worked in the same role at Ajax.

Blind reacted to the news getting out with an oblique message on Twitter, stating: "Such a pity but typical that this is within a day with the 'media'.

"It is also a misrepresentation of things. Sigh.."

Blind, only a substitute in Ajax's last games before the World Cup break, scored for the Netherlands during their campaign in Qatar, netting in the 3-1 win over the United States at the last-16 stage.

One short of a century of Netherlands caps, Blind will hope to remain in favour during Ronald Koeman's second stint as head coach of the Oranje.

Koeman is taking over from Louis van Gaal, whose third spell in charge of the national team ended with a defeat on penalties to Argentina in the World Cup quarter-finals.

Lionel Scaloni dismissed the assertion his Argentina team were rightly criticised for their antics against the Netherlands.

Argentina face Croatia in the first World Cup semi-final on Tuesday, after overcoming the Netherlands on penalties.

The Copa America champions led 2-0 at Lusail Stadium yet were pegged back to a 2-2 draw by Wout Weghorst's double.

But Emiliano Martinez's saves paved the way for Lautaro Martinez to score the winning penalty in the shoot-out and send Argentina through to the last four.

The match was not without its controversy. Some of Argentina's players celebrated wildly in front of the Netherlands squad, while there were tussles on the touchline and Lionel Messi seemed to confront Oranje coach Louis van Gaal.

Scaloni, however, does not believe his team behaved poorly.

"The game was played the way we have to play, both teams did that," he said in a press conference.

"Some games, things can happen, arguments, challenging times. That's why there's a referee to ensure there's justice.

"We need to put an end to this idea that this is Argentina. We lost to Saudi Arabia and didn't do anything.

"We won the Copa America in Brazil and experienced the most sporting behaviour with Messi, [Leandro] Paredes and Neymar, all sat together in the tunnel.

"I'm not convinced of this idea of unsporting behaviour. We play with pride, the way we have to play and then the referee is in charge of decisions. We respect all the teams, the Netherlands, Croatia and all the opponents. That's one of our main characteristics of our personality.

"We need to end this idea of not being good winners or losers, that's very far from what we are as a team and a squad, and the way we represent this nation."

Messi, usually so composed, even seemed caught up in the emotion against the Netherlands, though with this likely to be his final World Cup, the 35-year-old's desire to end his wait for the trophy seems truly fierce.

Scaloni said: "Messi, I know him so well, he's always been like that, always been a winner, he's so eager and willing to keep playing football."

Asked how it felt to coach Messi at his last World Cup, Scaloni added: "We will see whether he continues playing or not, we will keep enjoying him, that's all we can do – for us and the world of football.

"If things turn out well, everything will be good for us, we have our whole country supporting us."

Lionel Messi gives Argentina a "special advantage", says Nicolas Tagliafico, as La Albiceleste prepare for their World Cup semi-final with Croatia.

Lionel Scaloni's side are two wins away from Qatar 2022 glory, having shrugged off a shock opening loss against Saudi Arabia to battle their way to the last four.

Captain Messi has won virtually all major honours possible save for the World Cup, and in likely his final World Cup with his country, is out to complete his collection.

Tagliafico credits the veteran forward as the driving factor both for and behind their run to within 90 minutes of the final, stating he fires his team-mates on to greater heights.

"He's always been like this," he stated. "For us, he is our captain, our leader, the one who pushes us and motivates us. He's the one who has that special advantage.

"When we are on the pitch, we know we have Messi. We are so happy to have him as our captain. That's the most beautiful thing, to do this with Messi by our side.

"This World Cup, we have enough experience to reach this stage. We know in the knockouts, there'll be a few moments where we will struggle.

"We have the experience. We need to have enough character to go through all that and overcome it. That motivates you even further."

Penalties were required to see Argentina through their quarter-final clash with the Netherlands, in what devolved into a bad-tempered affair from both sets of players.

Scaloni's men were accused of being poor winners after their victory, but Tagliafico has defended his actions and those of his team-mates, suggesting they will behave the same again.

"Those situations happen in the world of football," he added. "We are not machines. The emotions were running high. It has happened in previous matches.

"It will likely happen again. This was a World Cup quarter-final, with two teams fighting it out. We tried to live it as such."

Louis van Gaal says he leaves a Netherlands squad with close bonds but not enough wingers after he retired in the aftermath of their World Cup exit.

The Oranje went unbeaten throughout regulation time at Qatar 2022 and were only eliminated on penalties by Argentina in the quarter-finals on Friday.

Van Gaal's side boasted an array of defensive and offensive talent, with Cody Gakpo finishing the tournament with three goals to his name up front in attack and Wout Weghorst snatching a dramatic brace versus La Albiceleste.

But though the veteran coach feels he departs a team that can rely on each other, he acknowledges they lack the crucial players out wide to exploit the full breadth of the pitch.

"What do I leave behind with the Oranje?" he told AD. "I leave a good, close-knit group with a lot of footballing ability.

"But I leave without wingers who can pass an opponent at the highest level. You need wingers who can pass those men.

"Dutch football doesn't have that at the moment, not when it comes to the very highest level of a World Cup. That's why I started playing differently."

Van Gaal noticeably favoured a direct approach in the closing stages of the Netherlands' game with Argentina, forcing extra-time after two late goals forged through the middle.

The 71-year-old will now be succeeded by former Oranje boss Ronald Koeman, who returns to the helm of the national team, having left for an ill-fated spell with Barcelona in August 2020.

Frenkie de Jong has described the officiating of the Netherlands' World Cup quarter-final against Argentina as "scandalous", claiming referee Antonio Mateu Lahoz was influenced by Lionel Messi.

The Netherlands staged a remarkable comeback to force extra time after going 2-0 down in Friday's clash courtesy of Wout Weghorst double, but the Oranje then suffered penalty heartache as they lost the shoot-out 4-3.

Lahoz was widely criticised for his display after showing 15 yellow cards during the match.

Argentina captain Messi said Lahoz was not "up to the task" of overseeing such a fixture at the end of a heated affair, and while De Jong agrees, he felt the presence of his former Barcelona team-mate contributed. 

"When regular playing time was over, the Argentina players all went to him and from then on he only whistled for Argentina," De Jong said of Lahoz. 

"Jurrien Timber's shoe was kicked off, but then he whistled for a foul against us. Luuk [de Jong] just wins a normal header and he blows his whistle, they kick the ball into our dugout, he doesn't care.

"Messi takes the ball with his hand, he just lets it go. He was really scandalous. 

"He is a nice guy, a good referee. But here he was beyond reason. I think he lost his way in overtime. 

"It could well be that the greatness of Lionel Messi had an influence on that. It's not the referee's fault, but it did affect the game."

Only Spain, with four, have lost more World Cup penalty shoot-outs than the Netherlands, one win, three defeats, while Argentina have prevailed on spot-kicks at the tournament more often than any other team with five and one defeat.

The manner of the Netherlands' defeat left De Jong stunned, with the midfielder revealing he was convinced they would lift the trophy.

"I was convinced that we would win when we equalised," De Jong said. "In any case, I was convinced that we would become world champions.''

Argentina will face "karma" for their actions during their 4-3 penalty shoot-out triumph against the Netherlands in the World Cup quarter-finals, says former Italy international Claudio Marchisio.

La Albiceleste reached the semi-finals for the second time in three tournaments after they prevailed on penalties following a late Oranje rally that saw extra time finish with the scores level at 2-2.

The match was an extremely fractious affair and broke the World Cup record for cards handed out, with referee Antonio Mateu Lahoz brandishing 14 yellows and one red.

But the behaviour of Argentina in victory - with Nicolas Otamendi taunting the defeated Dutch squad after penalties the standout from several displays of poor sportsmanship - will haunt them, claims Marchisio

"Watch out," Marchisio wrote on Twitter. "What you sow, you will reap. The law of karma is inexorable, evasion is impossible, [to quote] Mahatma Gandhi."

Tempers appeared closing to boiling over at several points during Friday's match, and the bad blood was still evident well after Lautaro Martinez's penalty sealed victory for Argentina.

Lionel Messi was seen to remonstrate with Netherlands coach Louis van Gaal, while he also was involved in a verbal altercation with Oranje forward Wout Weghorst during a post-match interview.

Goalkeeper Emiliano Martinez meanwhile accused referee Lahoz of being "useless". Messi refused to criticise the official's performance, citing expected punishment if he did.

Argentina will face Croatia on Tuesday in the first semi-final of Qatar 2022, with Lionel Scaloni's side looking to reach their second final in eight years, after Brazil 2014.

Argentina and the Netherlands are being investigated by FIFA following Friday's fiery World Cup quarter-final.

South American champions Argentina prevailed 4-3 on penalties at Lusail Stadium, having earlier squandered a two-goal lead to draw 2-2 as the game went the distance.

Referee Antonio Mateu Lahoz issued 15 cards to players who played a part in the game – the most in World Cup history, overtaking Cameroon versus Germany in 2002 (14).

Netherlands defender Denzel Dumfries was also shown a red card after the match.

There was a big flashpoint in the 89th minute when Leandro Paredes committed a foul on Nathan Ake and then booted the ball into the Netherlands' dugout.

Both sets of players and coaching staff squared off, though tensions again threatened to boil over in extra-time and also in the subsequent penalty shoot-out.

FIFA announced in a statement on Saturday that proceedings have been opened against the Argentinian Football Association and the Dutch Football Association.

The charge relates to a possible breach of article 12 of the FIFA Disciplinary Code – the misconduct of players and officials.

Lionel Scaloni's side are also being investigated over an additional potential breach of article 16, which relates to order and security at matches.

Argentina have won the most penalty shoot-outs of any side in World Cup history (five out of six), while only Spain have lost more than the Netherlands (one win from four).

Speaking after the game, Argentina superstar Lionel Messi criticised Spanish official Lahoz over his handling of the contest.

"I don't want to talk about the referee, because you can get a suspension, but people saw what happened," he said. 

"FIFA have to look at that, they can't put in a referee who isn't up to the job at this stage."

Defenders Gonzalo Montiel and Marcos Acuna were among the players booked and will now serve a suspension in Tuesday's semi-final against Brazil's conquerors Croatia.

Wout Weghorst expressed dismay at being snubbed by Lionel Messi after the Netherlands striker was given the brush-off following Friday's chaotic quarter-final.

The Dutch frontman made a stunning impact as a substitute, scoring a late double to force a 2-2 draw and take the match to extra time.

He almost overshadowed Messi, whose penalty had put Argentina two goals clear, and afterwards it emerged Weghorst and Messi clashed following the Copa America champions' victory on penalties.

Prior to a post-match TV interview with TyC Sports, Messi said to somebody out of camera shot: "What are you looking at, fool?"

That bystander has been identified by the broadcaster as having been Weghorst.

The Netherlands are going home after being unable to cap their thrilling fightback, and Weghorst was taken aback by Messi's attitude when he caught up with him.

"I wanted to shake his hand after the game, I have a lot of respect for him as a soccer player," Weghorst said, "but he threw my hand to the side and didn't want to talk to me."

Quoted by Marca, Weghorst added: "My Spanish isn't very good, but he said disrespectful words to me and that disappoints me, really disappointing."

Weghorst became the first substitute to score twice in a World Cup match for the Netherlands.

The game saw 15 cards shown to players that played an active part, which set a new record for the most in World Cup history. Dutch defender Denzel Dumfries was sent off after the shoot-out, with tensions spilling over.

Lionel Messi was motivated to lead Argentina past the Netherlands due to feeling "a little attacked" by Louis van Gaal's pre-match comments, Lionel Scaloni said.

Messi is enjoying an outstanding World Cup and continued in that vein on Friday as he scored one and created another in a 2-2 quarter-final draw with the Netherlands.

Argentina advanced after a penalty shoot-out, recovering after Wout Weghorst's dramatic double had denied them victory in normal time.

There had predictably been plenty of focus on Messi heading into the match, with Netherlands coach Van Gaal suggesting Argentina were relying too heavily on their captain in attack while he would not be asked to defend.

Messi appeared to gesture in Van Gaal's direction on multiple occasions, including after scoring, cupping his ears in an apparent reference to Juan Roman Riquelme's own celebration.

Van Gaal and Riquelme were at odds during their time together at Messi's former club Barcelona.

"I'm not going to give Van Gaal advice, but it's not easy to make [Messi] play angry," Argentina coach Scaloni told TyC Sports.

"I don't know if he was angry, but to make him play the way he played today... it's exciting.

"These are things that happen on the pitch and stay there. But we didn't play with one less when we didn't have the ball, we played with 11.

"I think with Leo he felt a little attacked and showed that he is the best of all time. We are happy to have him."

After a last-16 win over Australia, in which Messi was similarly influential, team-mate Alexis Mac Allister had explained how the legendary forward was inspired to perform.

Messi was involved in a confrontation with Australia's Aziz Behich moments before scoring his first World Cup knockout goal.

"Leo, when these things happen, he brings out that inner fire that he has, that personality that makes him even bigger than he is," Mac Allister told reporters.

Lionel Messi accused Netherlands boss Louis van Gaal of showing "disrespect" before Argentina ended the Netherlands' World Cup hopes in Friday's dramatic quarter-final.

Van Gaal, remembering the 2014 semi-final between the teams, said ahead of Friday's game: "Eight years ago at the World Cup in Brazil, we succeeded well in neutralising Messi. He didn't hit a ball then."

That comment may have been one of the issues that upset Messi, while Argentina were also fired up by suggestions the Netherlands fancied themselves if the game came down to a penalty shoot-out.

The 2014 match finished goalless, with Argentina triumphing on penalties before losing to Germany in the final, but this time the Netherlands supposedly liked their chances on spot-kicks.

As it happened, a roller coaster game at Lusail Stadium did come down to a shoot-out, and Argentina won through once again to book a semi-final against Croatia.

Messi was rankled by the Dutch approach in the game, which saw Argentina's 2-0 lead reeled in after the Netherlands bombarded the Albiceleste penalty area with high balls in the closing stages.

Quoted by ESPN, Messi said: "I feel disrespected by Van Gaal after his pre-game comments and some Dutch players spoke too much during the game.

"Van Gaal sells that he plays good football and then he puts forwards in the box and starts throwing long balls. We deserved to go through and that's what happened."

Reports have also claimed that when Messi approached Van Gaal and Dutch assistant coach Edgar Davids after the game, he was complaining the Netherlands boss had too much to say, and his hand gesturing suggested as much.

Van Gaal's direct intentions were made clear when he brought on Wout Weghorst for Memphis Depay in the 78th minute, and the 6ft 5in striker made a major impact against the Argentina defence.

He headed in to cut the deficit, then scored from a sublimely worked free-kick that deceived Argentina, with his equaliser in normal time coming after 100 minutes and 30 seconds, the latest World Cup knockout stage goal on record, since Opta has exact goal times (from 1966).

Weghorst became the first substitute to score twice in a World Cup match for the Netherlands, and he apparently departed with another souvenir: a tongue-lashing from Messi.

"What are you looking at, fool?" Messi said to somebody off-camera before a TV interview with TyC Sports. That bystander has been identified by the Argentina broadcaster as having been Weghorst.

Argentina coach Lionel Scaloni praised his side for "facing every situation" after watching them come through a penalty shoot-out to see off the Netherlands and secure a place in the World Cup semi-finals.

Scaloni's men squandered a 2-0 lead handed to them by a Nahuel Molina strike and a Lionel Messi penalty with two late efforts from Dutch substitute Wout Weghorst sending the match to extra-time and beyond.

Goalkeeper Emiliano Martinez saved the Netherlands' first two spot-kicks, from Virgil van Dijk and Steven Berghuis, before Lautaro Martinez slotted home the winning kick to send Argentina through to a last four clash with Croatia.

Scaloni said: "Argentina have team spirit because we know how to face every situation in the game.

"It's true we did not deserve to go to a penalty shoot-out but we fought to the end because the Dutch caused trouble for us.

"It was a strange second half. When you think everything is over and then it is not you are surprised.

"This team has pride, experience as well as young players, and this is key as we want to fight."

The match boiled over on several occasions with Spanish official Antonio Mateu Lahoz setting a World Cup record by issuing 15 cards, 14 yellows and one red – to Denzel Dumfries after the shoot-out – to overtake the previous record of 14, set in 2002 between Cameroon and Germany.

He also seemed to lose control on a couple of occasions with both benches involved in pushing and shoving in the second half of normal time and again after 90 minutes.

Scaloni said: "I don't want to talk about the referee, I have a very good relationship with him and luckily everything turned out well.

"The game was heated, this was a quarter-final, it happens. It stays on the pitch but we had 11 men out there."

Asked if he was surprised at the Netherlands' approach late on of tossing long balls towards Weghorst and fellow substitute Luuk De Jong, Scaloni refused to comment.

He said: "I won't enter this debate. They played in a way I didn't expect but they were almost out of the World Cup, each coach works out how they want to play.

"I won't talk about their philosophy, I am no-one to judge how they played."

Netherlands boss Louis van Gaal now enters retirement having taken charge of the Dutch for a third and final time.

The 71-year-old has been heavily criticised by the country's media for his playing style during the World Cup but insists he bows out with his head held high.

He said: "There's nothing to reproach myself for. The boys fought until the bitter end and now they are in the dressing room feeling despondent. They gave everything, I am incredibly proud.

"I had a wonderful time. It's incredibly painful to go out like this, especially as I did everything I could to prevent this from happening.

"What I am leaving is an excellent group, as people and footballers. I was the coach for 20 games and we didn't lose any of them. There is a reason for that."

Argentina's progress to the World Cup semi-finals led Lionel Messi to say Diego Maradona is "pushing us from heaven".

Argentina have not won the tournament since Maradona inspired their second triumph in 1986, and this is the first finals since his passing two years ago.

Albiceleste captain Messi has long been compared to the country's other great number 10, with his performances in Qatar encouraging optimism of a long-awaited third title.

Messi provided a sensational assist for Nahuel Molina against the Netherlands in Friday's quarter-final, then doubled his side's lead from the penalty spot.

But Argentina were given a major scare as Wout Weghorst's dramatic double sent the tie to penalties.

Emiliano Martinez made a pair of saves, allowing Argentina to scrape through before celebrating on the pitch in front of their fans – with Maradona prominent in their thoughts.

"We leave that on the pitch with our people," Messi said. "We enjoyed that moment both here and in Argentina.

"People are full of enthusiasm, we are among the four semi-finalists.

"Now we have a weight off our shoulders, and we have been saying this from the beginning: Diego is pushing us from heaven."

Messi knew how close Argentina came to elimination, although he did not feel the match should have gone that far as Weghorst's second goal came from a controversial 101st-minute free-kick.

"There was a lot of disappointment when they drew level, which was very unfair," Messi said. "It came from a set-piece which I didn't think was a foul.

"I don't want to speak about referees, you can be punished and you can't be honest. He wasn't up to the standard and he was hard on us.

"When Lautaro Martinez scored, there was a huge weight off our chests. We could've been out after being 2-0 ahead."

Messi had also been critical of referee Antonio Mateu Lahoz in a television interview with beIN SPORTS. Lahoz showed 14 yellow cards and a red in a hot-tempered encounter.

"We feared before the game because we knew about this referee and FIFA should review that," Messi said. "They cannot use a referee like this at this stage of the tournament because he was not in control of the match."

Virgil van Dijk was left "very hurt" after the Netherlands were knocked out of the World Cup on penalties by Argentina on Friday.

Goals from Nahuel Molina and Lionel Messi looked to have Argentina coasting to the semi-finals, but substitute Wout Weghorst scored twice late on to force the game into extra time.

Neither team could find a winner in the additional 30 minutes, but Emiliano Martinez saved from Van Dijk and then Steven Berghuis before Lautaro Martinez fired home the deciding spot-kick to knock the Netherlands out.

Van Dijk spoke of his frustration at his team pulling themselves back into the contest, only to lose on penalties.

"I'm very disappointed that we're out of the tournament, after a very eventful game," the Liverpool star told reporters.

"We showed great character, we came back last 15 minutes, got extra time then it's penalties.

"Unfortunately we couldn't get the job done. We're going home. I'm very sad about that, but that's life. We lost on penalties, and that's the thing that is difficult. It's like a lottery.

"We practiced penalties a lot but unfortunately, he [Emiliano Martinez] made two great saves and we're out.

"I think we were confident, but you can't replicate a full stadium where 80,000 fans are whistling against you and a different goalie that you don't face in training."

Netherlands captain Van Dijk took the opening penalty of the shoot-out, only to see his low effort saved by Emiliano Martinez down to the goalkeeper's right.

When asked about his spot-kick after the match, the centre-back said: "I never took it in the Premier League, so it's quite difficult. It's never easy, you're under pressure, but I was looking forward to it, I was ready for it. 

"He saved it, fair play to him. Bad for us, bad for me. I'm very sad, but unfortunately things like this happen in life and it's about how you deal with it.

"I'll be very sad for the next period and I'll regroup, be with my family, and think about good things in life.

"These things happen unfortunately, you can miss. But it doesn't mean you feel fine, I'm very hurt and I felt like I let my guys down a bit. It's about turning that feeling into hunger for the rest of the season."

Van Dijk's defensive partner Nathan Ake echoed his skipper's sentiments on the disappointing manner of the Netherlands' exit, having done so well to get back in the game.

"We can be proud. Obviously we wanted more but it wasn't to be," Ake explained. "We stayed in the game, we tried to fight back. In the end, it's painful.

"Maybe in extra time we should've pushed on a bit more, but the legs were a little bit tired."

Ake was also asked for his thoughts on an ill-tempered game that produced 15 cards, more than any other World Cup clash in history.

"That's part of football," Ake added. "They love their country, they want to fight for their country and we have the same. It's an emotional game. Everyone wants to go through.

"In the end, the penalties decided the game and not the referee."

Emiliano Martinez slammed "useless" referee Antonio Mateu Lahoz following Argentina's dramatic penalty shoot-out victory over the Netherlands.

The goalkeeper was the hero, saving from Virgil van Dijk and Steven Berghuis as La Albiceleste prevailed 4-3 on spot-kicks after a 2-2 draw, in which they surrendered a 2-0 lead.

The performance of referee Lahoz was a huge talking point at Lusail Stadium; the Spanish official issuing 15 yellow cards during the ill-tempered affair – the most in World Cup history.

He also added 10 minutes at the end of regulation time, in which the Netherlands scored a dramatic last-gasp equaliser through Wout Weghorst to force an additional 30 minutes.

"The referee is useless. Hopefully, we don't have that referee anymore," Martinez said, before dedicating the victory to his compatriots.

"The first thing that comes to mind is emotion," he added. "I do this for 45 million people. To give people such joy is the biggest thing right now. We are in the semi-final because we have passion and heart. We are excited, as are the people."

Namesake Lautaro, who netted the decisive spot-kick, added: "On that walk to the point of the penalty, I was very calm because I trust my work. When I caught the ball, I thought about my daughter. She changed my life."

Alexis Mac Allister is expecting a "very tough" semi-final clash with Croatia, who stunned Brazil on penalties earlier in the day, while Rodrigo de Paul is embracing the moment.

"I'm excited because I work hard to make these things happen," the midfielder said. "Playing a World Cup semi-final is not an everyday occurrence.

"The idea was to come the first day and leave on the last day. We rose from a defeat at the beginning. Hopefully, these moments that are incredible keep coming. I tell people to enjoy it because this belongs to everyone."

© 2023 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.