The 7th annual 2C2W World Awards Gala, which took place in the vibrant heart of New York City on December 1, 2023, was a grand celebration of excellence in athletics. The event, attended by renowned figures from sports, academia, and business, illuminated the city with its recognition of extraordinary talent and leadership.

              In the spotlight was Fitz Coleman, the esteemed coach of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics 110m hurdles champion Hansle Parchment. His remarkable guidance and mentorship in the world of track and field, culminating in Olympic glory, were celebrated with fervour. Coleman's acceptance of his award was met with resounding applause, a tribute to his impactful coaching career.

  Peter Zinno, recognized for his significant contributions as the team manager for Team USA at the 2004 Indoor World Championships, was another key figure honoured at the gala. Zinno's expertise in sports management and his strategic leadership in shaping world-class athletic teams were highlighted as exemplary.

  The gala also paid homage to Garth Gayle, the innovative President of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA), and Dr. Warren Blake, a trailblazer in sports medicine. Gayle's and Blake’s respective roles in sports administration and athlete health care were lauded, underscoring the diverse facets of excellence in athletics.

 

              A highlight of the evening was the prestigious honour bestowed upon the JAAA. The JAAA was recognized for its significant contributions to the development and promotion of athletics, both locally and internationally. This accolade was a testament to the JAAA's commitment to fostering talent and elevating the sport to new heights.

 Dr Dorothy Hudson-Gayle, Basset Thompson, Raphael Ney Jean Francois and Michael Higgins were also among the distinguished individuals who were honoured.

 The 2C2W World Awards Gala transcended being merely an award ceremony; it was a unifying event celebrating the spirit of sportsmanship and leadership. Each story shared by the honorees echoed a legacy of hard work, determination, and a commitment to excellence, leaving the audience inspired and looking forward to the future of sports.

In a glittering celebration of athletic achievement and community impact, the 2C2W Athletics Academy is gearing up for its seventh annual awards ceremony and gala dinner and dance at Mirelle's in New York on December 1.

The prestigious event will honour a stellar lineup of Jamaican and Caribbean sports personalities, including track and field coach Fitz Coleman, former JAAA's President Dr. Warren Blake, current JAAA's President Garth Gayle, former New York Institute of Technology coach Peter Zinno, and several other distinguished individuals.

The brainchild behind these renowned awards, Clive Walters, provided insights into the evolution and significance of the ceremony. Initially conceived in 2017 to recognize coaches on World Coaches Day, the event has evolved to embrace a wider spectrum of contributions to sports, community, and leadership.

"This year we have included sports medicine, sports administration, outstanding alumni from GC Foster, and, of course, coaches," Walters explained. "We want to be inclusive and recognize the changing dynamics of the sports world. We've expanded our categories to acknowledge individuals making significant contributions at various levels of sports."

Among the honorees, the legendary Peter Zinno, known for his influential role in recruiting Jamaican athletes and Dr Dorothy Hudson-Gayle, stand out.

"And then we have our own Fitz Coleman. We have Dr. Warren Blake for sports medicine, Mark Biggins for leadership, and lawyers, recognizing the legal aspect of sports, as well as community involvement," Walters added.

Coach Coleman, who has coaches Hansle Parchment to Olympic gold, two World Championship silver medals and a bronze, said news that he was being awarded came as a surprise but he is grateful to have been recognized.

“It came basically out of nowhere but I feel very honoured, extremely honoured, and I appreciate Clive and his team’s effort to put this together and make this possible,” the esteemed coach told Sportsmax.TV.

“You get involved in sport because you love what you do and you think you have something to contribute. I got involved because I loved the sport and I felt I had something to contribute. Getting accolades was not on the agenda; that was not something I thought about, it was just getting involved and doing what I could so when this comes along it is definitely something that anyone would be proud of so I am very grateful to Clive and his team for this award. I really appreciate it.”

This year's awards reflect a holistic approach to acknowledging those who impact the sports arena in various capacities. Walters highlighted the importance of recognizing associations, singling out the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) for its global success.

"The JAAA has competed with the biggest brand countries in the world and been very successful. The brand of the JAAA is so big, and it's not just run by itself. It's run by people and volunteers," Walters praised.

Also among the distinguished individuals to be honoured are Basset Thompson, Raphael Ney Jean Francois and Michael Higgins.

The ceremony aims to showcase appreciation and recognition for individuals and organizations contributing at the community, national, and international levels. Walters expressed the essence of the event as a time to "recognize them and have a good time."

Garth Gayle, President of the Jamaica Athletic Administrative Association (JAAA) and Olympian Dr. Una Morris are among four sports personalities conferred with the Order of Distinction during Jamaica’s annual National Honours and Awards held on the lawns of Kings House in Kingston on Monday when the country celebrated National Heroes' Day.

Long-time sports administrator David Mais and many-time national table tennis champion turned coach Sandra Reittie also received awards.

Gayle, a long-serving member of the JAAA, was elected president in November 2020 but has had a long and distinguished career as a sports administrator. The principal of Charlie Mount High School since 2016, Gayle has served as chairman of the North American, Central American and Caribbean Athletics, was a member of World Athletics Technical Committee between 2016 and 2019 and a member of the Organizing Committee of the Inter-Secondary Schools Sports Association.

He was conferred with the Order of Distinction (Commander Class) by Governor General Sir Patrick Allen for his contribution to sports locally and internationally.

Dr Una Morris, was conferred with the Order of Distinction (Officer Class) for her contribution to the field of sports, especially track and field.

Dr Morris is a retired sprinter, physician, restaurateur, and food caterer.

She represented Jamaica at the 1964, 1968 and 1972 Summer Olympics. As a teenager she finished fourth in the 200m at the Summer Games in Tokyo, Japan. She also won a bronze medal in the 4×100 metres relay at the 1967 Pan American Games and was Jamaican Sportswoman of the Year in 1963 and 1964.

David Mais, a former chairman of the board of the GC Foster College of Sports and Education is a long-time golf administrator and tournament director, was conferred with the Order of Distinction (Officer Class) for his contribution to sports, education and community development.

Reittie, an 11-time national table tennis champion, who now coaches young athletes was conferred with the Order of Distinction (Officer Class) for her contribution to sports, in particular, table tennis and the development of young athletes.

Reittie is a former table tennis coach at the University of the West Indies, Mona campus and has coached at Ardenne High School and Campion College.

One-hundred-and-twenty-six Jamaicans were conferred with national honours during the ceremonies on Monday.

Hoilett represented Jamaica in the 440 yards (400m) at various championships, with the 1964 Olympics being the pinnacle of his career.

"Rupert was known as a hard worker with talent to boot. He was good enough to make the Olympic team even as a Kingston College schoolboy coming out of Boys Championships," said Garth Gayle. "We owe our current successes to athletes like Hoilett who toiled hard for success and lifted the name of Jamaica even when there was not much to gain from the sport. May his soul rest in eternal peace. Condolences to his family and friends," concluded Gayle.

Hoilett came to public attention at the Boys Championships when he won the the 440 yards race in 49.3 seconds, which at the time was the first sub-50-second clocking in the history of the event.

He would later book a place on the Jamaica team to Tokyo Olympics with an improved 49.1 seconds and was given the honour of carrying the nation's flag during the opening ceremonies.

In 2019, Hoilett’s property on Skibo Avenue in Kingston was damaged by fire.

Jamaican hammer thrower Erika Belvit has expressed her profound disappointment at not being selected to her country’s team to the World Athletics Championships in Budapest, later this month.

In June, Belvit threw 70.04m, her second best throw this season to win a silver medal at the CAC Games in San Salvador, a testament to her dedication and hard work. Though, her season-best throw of 70.09m falls short of the 74m automatic qualifying standard, her performance earned her a spot among the top-ranked hammer throwers in the world, reaching as high as 34th in the World Athletics rankings.

Yet, when the Jamaican team for the World Championships was announced, her name was conspicuously absent.

On hearing of her non-selection, Belvit reached out to a JAAA official, a ‘Mr Smith’, whom she had met during the CAC Games, asking why she was not selected.

In his reply on WhatsApp, Mr. Smith told the distraught thrower that only one quota athlete could be selected for any one event. However, this is not true as under the World Athletics rules up to three athletes can be selected.

Three years ago World Athletics overhauled its qualification system in an attempt to create a fairer system where half of athletes would qualify for major championships through achieving an automatic qualifying standard and the other half through their world rankings.

Belvit subsequently fired off an email to President of the JAAA Garth Gayle stating her case and inquiring about her non-selection. He replied saying, “The selection committee would have made its recommendation and you were not selected for this occasion. Please continue to persevere in your training for future events.”

Sportsmax.TV reached out to Lincoln Eatmon, an executive of the Jamaican Athletic Administrative Association (JAAA), who provided insight into the JAAA selection process. He explained, "We had to make up our minds because you can't afford to take everybody who is ranked and as a quota athlete. So we made a policy decision that we're only going to take a certain amount and we will give the preference to the national champions who are quota qualified. We decided that we would keep the number at five and so the others who were selected have made the finals at the last because the last World Championships like Kimberly Williamson and Kimberly Williams," he said.

“And then Rasheed Dwyer was selected because he provides possible cover for the sprint relay because well, they seem to have a problem finding healthy people.”

Eatmon explained further that the existing policy was in part based on cost containment and that Belvit had subsequently fallen down the rankings.

“It would cost to start, you know, I would think somewhere about that JMD $1,000,000 because you have to think of the camp and all of those expenses. So it's a lot of money to take a one person. So it's a matter of controlling costs as well.”

Regarding Belvit’s ranking, Eatmon, stated, “She medalled at CAC but you have to look at where she's ranked. As of the 30 June, Erika was ranked 44 in the world. It doesn't make sense taking somebody who is ranked over 40 in an event unless there are other compelling reasons or even over 36, you have to bear in mind it’s cost containment.”

It should be noted that 15 athletes in the top 44 have not thrown farther than Belvit this season.

Meanwhile, Caltha Seymour of the Heaven to the Yeah Foundation, a former hammer thrower herself, has recognized Belvit's potential and the need for more opportunities for athletes in field events.

The foundation has expressed willingness to fund Erika's trip to Budapest, emphasizing the importance of experience and competition for an athlete's development. Seymour stated, "Erika has worked very hard to be in the Top 40 in the world in her event, and being left off of the world's team is disheartening, as it displays that the JAAA is not committed to providing opportunities to develop their world-class athletes in the field events.

“Athletes require experience to develop, especially a year from Paris 2024. There is a process to development, and our JA athletes in the underrepresented sports need to compete with the world's best... to be the world's best. They need to be provided the opportunity for experience... competition requires development."

As discussions about Erika's exclusion unfolded, she voiced her heartache: "I am extremely disappointed. I can't even express how extremely disappointed I am, especially because I qualified and I worked so hard to get to this point. It's not just me, it's other people as well who have worked so hard just to get to qualify and then to be told, not even to be told but to find out you're not going to be able to make it and not being told why is very disheartening."

She explained further that her disappointment is not just about not being selected.

"This means so much to me. This is more than just going and being there. This is about building and creating this legacy, specifically for women’s hammer. This is such a big thing for me, it always has been. Just becoming closer with the people I have, a lot of throwers, coaches in Jamaica and seeing how important it is. There is more to Jamaica than just track, there is more to Jamaica than just running. There are some great people, especially on the field side, who have been showing up and showing out and I just want to be a part of that and the fact that I wont even be able to do that is so disheartening. And I am upset. I am very upset,” she said.

 

 

 

Yohan Blake and his management team have unequivocally denied any validity to a widely-circulated article stating that the 2011 World Champion will be taking legal action against the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) over a timer malfunction at the recently-concluded National Championships at the National Stadium.

The article which is said to have been published on Wednesday, July 12, derived from the fact that Blake ran by himself in an attempt to make the men’s 100 metres semi-finals, after he was initially disqualified for a false start.

During his run against the clock, Blake, the World’s second-fastest man over the distance was clocked at 10.32 seconds, which was not good enough to see him through to the next round.

While it was rumoured that the 33-year-old was not pleased with the time, his manager Timothy Spencer has since cleared the air.

“Yohan has no intention of suing anyone,” Spencer told Sportsmax.TV.

Blake, who is in Silesia, Poland also rubbished the 'report' stating, "I dont know where this is coming from. I have moved on already and I'm focussing on the races ahead of me. In my head I'm already thinking about 2024 and hope I can represent Jamaica in the Olympic Games in 2024 in Paris."

Meanwhile, when contacted JAAA’s president Garth Gayle said the article "is not credible because we have no official documentation."  

As the anticipation builds towards the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) National Senior and Junior Championships, the event received a massive $35 million boost from the Government to ensure all goes accordingly for the four-day event which will select Jamaica's teams to various Championships later this year.

With performances from Shericka Jackson, Ackeem Blake, Alana Reid and Jaydon Hibbert, among others, already setting the tone, coupled with the fact that Elaine Thompson-Herah is on the mend and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce will open her season at the July 6-9 championships, spectators are eager to see what will transpire inside the National Stadium.

The country's senior athletes will be hunting spots to the 19th World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary scheduled for August 19-27, while their junior counterparts will vie for selection to the NACAC Under-18 and Under-23 Championships in July, as well as the PanAm Under-20 Athletics Championships and the Under-18 Commonwealth Youth Games, both set for early August.

Minister of Sport Olivia Grange, while reminiscing on the fact that Jamaica is ranked fourth on the medals table with 137 medals, inclusive of 37 gold, 56 silver, and 44 bronze won over the years --only behind United States, Kenya and Russia --said the contribution through the Sports Development Foundation (SDF) represents an affirmation from the Government to support the country's athletes.

Grange, who presented a symbolic $10 million cheque during the event's launch at Jamaica Pegasus Hotel on Thursday, explained that another $25 million will follow in short order.

"As our athletes step up to the line to compete and secure their spots at the respective international meets, we want to assure them of their nation's and government's complete and unwavering support. We want to remind them that we are grateful for their work and contribution to the national pride. 

"Our athletes truly represent Jamaica in a big way. You are some of the best In the world, both at the junior and senior levels and when you compete, you compete hard, you compete fair and play by the rules. Always remember that you are first your own ambassador and then your family, your community and of course your country," Grange said.

"I am happy that we are able to provide this money and we would want to give more but the cake is only so big, but never before in the history of Jamaica his so much money been spent on sports. And in collaboration with the Ministry of Tourism, we will establish a Jamaica House in Budapest. This is something we have been doing at major games and the idea is to leverage the World class performances of our athletes to encourage people to buy Jamaica, so we intend to maximise the prosperity of Jamaica," she added.

Well over 400 athletes are expected to participate in the championships which will feature approximately 60 events for seniors and juniors.

All the country's top stars should also be present, barring injuries, with the marquee events, the men’s and women’s 100m finals and the 400m hurdles finals, set to highlight day two of the meet on Friday, while Sunday's last day will feature the 200m, 400m and sprint hurdles finals.

JAAA President Garth Gayle urged spectators both in Jamaica and abroad to throw their usual support behind the athletes as they give of their best on the track and in the field with one end goal, to represent Jamaica with distinction on the world stage.

Tickets are already available online and will also be made available at the stadium’s ticket office and at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel on Monday. Season tickets will be available for $7,500, while the daily entry for the Grandstand finish line will vary at $1,000 for Thursday, $3,000 for Friday, $2,000 on Saturday and $2,500 for Sunday.

Regular Grandstand tickets are $1,000 Thursday, $2,500 on Friday, $1,500 for Saturday and $2,000 for Sunday.

The bleachers will only be opened on Friday at a cost of $500 for entry.

"I plead with spectators to fill the stands with your fervor, vigour and unflinching support. Your presence plays an important role in fostering that ideal environment to inspire the athletes to greater heights. Let's not overlook the strength of unity, sports provide that wonderful environment for uniting people, breaking down barriers and promoting respect in a current society that it is needed now. So, we want all Jamaicans to journey and come enjoy four days of excellent competition," Gayle said.

"This competition is more than just a way to name winners, it is also a celebration of human spirit, a symbol of strength and tenacity, it is a manifestation of our sense of National pride. I salute our athletes who have dedicated their entire lives and for those who would have been on the cusp of starting their careers, that the tradition will continue. I urge you to take advantage of the chance to come and observe our athletes in competition...keep in mind that they not only perform for themselves," he noted.

Gayle also praised the support of the Government and other stakeholders for their efforts and financial backing in making a championship a possibility.

"We appreciate your constant dedication to the development of athletics in Jamaica and find your effort to be genuinely admirable. The national senior and junior championships is a positive proof of how talented Jamaicans are and why we are regarded as a powerhouse in the world of athletics.

"Our athletes continue to display extraordinary skills, mesmerising our spectators with their grace, their speed, their agility, unmatched tenacity. Once a Jamaican puts on the National colours and goes to face the starter, to jump or to throw, they do so with pride. So we know it will be exciting because of the intense competition, spectacular performances and history-making events that will certainly take place," Gayle stated.

 

With the vast improvement in the performances of Jamaican juniors in track & field over the last few years, there has been a steady increase in the number of athletes who forgo a tertiary education to pursue a professional career immediately after high school.

While Jamaica Administrative Athletics Association President Garth Gayle admits there is nothing the administration can do to prevent this, he is urging athletes to think about life after track & field when making these decisions.

“I’ve always said education is the means by which any individual will be able to make good in years to come,” Gayle told SportsMax.TV.

“So, these are young athletes that are doing exceptionally well in their chosen disciplines within track and field. We believe that it is best for them to reach a particular age or at least a level of experience because getting into the senior elite program is not easy. There is some level of protection within the schools or within the education system and I believe they should relish and seek to benefit from that rather than to be making the rush too early,” Gayle added.

He did point out, however, that there are some clubs out there that prioritize athletes’ education while giving them an opportunity to compete professionally.

“There are programs and clubs that allow for these junior athletes to be properly prepared and taken care of, including their education. Usain Bolt when he made the move from William Knibb into the High-Performance Centre and continued his education as well because there was that support base and he was able to earn very well,” he said.

Gayle, who is also principal of the Charlemont High School, then had a message for young athletes in all sports, not just track and field.

“Those that are making this transition, remember your education because there is life after your chosen sport. It happens in all the various sports. As an educator myself, I believe the more you can be protected and get the necessary guidance, it will allow an athlete to stay with the sport a lot longer,” he said.

“There will come hiccups and when they come, and you don’t have that support base, Jamaicans are hard task masters. We demand a lot from our sportsmen and women, more so in track and field. It is on that basis that I would want to be cautious but we can’t stop it. We would want to provide as much encouragement and guidance towards one’s development through education,” Gayle said.

 

For many years, Jamaica has been known in the track and field world mostly producing historically great sprinters.

Recently, however, the country has seen its success at the global level spread to many other disciplines in the sport such as the jumps and the throws.

President of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA), Garth Gayle, is encouraged by this trend and hopes to see it continue.

“This all came about under the leadership of the late Howard Aris,” Gayle told SportsMax.TV at the launch of the Racers Grand Prix at the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel on Tuesday.

“I was the honorary secretary at the time and I remember several of our executive meetings where he made it clear to all of us, in such simple terms, that there will come the day when other countries will challenge us successfully in the sprints,” Gayle said.

“He went on to say that sprinting is a base for many other disciplines in track and field and that we need to start to venture and provide training grounds for coaches and competitions for the athletes in the different disciplines. That is why we have seen the improvement in the throws and in the jumps. I believe it has done us well,” Gayle added.

Over a short period of time, Jamaica has seen the emergence of the likes of Tajay Gayle, Shanieka Ricketts and, more recently, Jaydon Hibbert among others in the jumps as well as names like Fedrick Dacres and Danniel Thomas-Dodd in the throws.

Gayle became Jamaica’s first ever long jump World Champion when he jumped a National Record 8.69m, the 20th longest jump in history, to win gold at the 2019 World Championships in Doha.

Ricketts is a two-time World Championship silver medallist in the triple jump from Doha in 2019 and Eugene in 2022.

Jaydon Hibbert, who is only 18, won triple jump gold at the World Under-20 Championships in Cali in 2022 and, earlier this season, set a World Junior Record 17.54m to win at the NCAA Indoor Championships in Albuquerque.

We also saw the likes of Carey McLeod and Ackelia Smith win long jump medals at those same NCAA Indoor Championships.

Lamara Distin is undefeated this season in the high jump and broke her own National record earlier this season while, at last year’s World Under-20 Championships, another Jamaican, Brandon Pottinger, took home high jump gold.

In the throws, Dacres and Thomas-Dodd won silver medals in the discus and shot put, respectively, at the 2019 World Championships in Doha.

Gayle also outlined that clubs around the country have systems in place to ensure this trend continues.

“Our club systems are growing stronger and they too are of that similar mindset and we are seeing the benefits. GC Foster College must never be left out of the equation because they, in a similar way, are speaking that language.”

“We must continue to raise the bar. Jamaica has, without doubt, an abundance of sporting talent. We just need to continue to harness it and develop it,” he added.

 

President of the Jamaica Administrative Athletics Association (JAAA), Garth Gayle, says we may have seen the last edition of the Jamaica International Invitational.

The Invitational was launched in 2004 and has seen several global stars put on a show at Jamaica’s National Stadium over the years. Some of the standout performances at the meet over the years include Usain Bolt’s 9.76 in the 100m in May 2008 and his 19.56 in the 200m two years later.

On the Women’s side, Sanya Richards-Ross ran 49.89 to win the 400m in 2006 while Elaine Thompson-Herah won the 200m in 22.09 nine years later.

Unfortunately, the meet was last held in 2018 with the 2019 to 2022 editions all being cancelled due to a myriad of reasons ranging from lack of sponsorship to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Well, I know that event may have seen better days but we at the JAAA are looking at the possibility of how it is that we can bring in another event,” Gayle told SportsMax.TV at the launch of the Racers Grand Prix at the Jamaica Pegasus on Tuesday.

“The Racers Grand Prix is excellent, without a doubt, and it must and will be supported by the association but we believe our athletes need at least one more high-level meet here in Jamaica,” Gayle added.

Gayle then announced that discussions are ongoing regarding the future of the meet and the possible announcement of a replacement.

“There would have been the need to revisit and that is what is happening as we speak and, in short order, you will hear more about a similar meet, but not that meet,” Gayle said.

Shericka Jackson, the fastest woman alive over 200m, has withdrawn from Jamaica’s team to the Commonwealth Games that got underway in Birmingham, England on Thursday, Sportsmax.TV sources in the United Kingdom have indicated.

Jackson, 28, won a gold and two silver medals at the recently concluded World Athletics Championships in Eugene, Oregon.

She won the 200m in 21.45, a new lifetime best and national record and is the second fastest time ever run by a woman. Only the late Florence Griffith-Joyner who ran 21.34 at the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, South Korea has run faster.

She was second in the 100m in a personal best of 10.73 and anchored Jamaica to the silver medal in the 4x100m relay.

The best active combination sprinter in history as the only woman with global medals in the 100m, 200m and 400m, Jackson was named in a 47-member team that will represent Jamaica in track and field at the Commonwealth Games but impeccable sources have indicated that a decision has been made by her handlers to withdraw her participation.

However, Garth Gayle, president of the Jamaica Athletic Administrative Association (JAAA), he has not yet been informed of the decision. “No, I have no such knowledge or such information,” he said.

Sources suggest that instead of flying to Birmingham, Jackson will travel to Italy where she will camp with the MVP Track Club and compete on the circuit for the remainder of the season.

Calls to Jackson’s agent, Adrian Laidlaw, went unanswered.

The Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission (JADCO) has admitted that it had only tested three of the four members of Jamaica’s Women U20 4x100m relay team on April 17, 2022, after they had established the now rejected world record set at the 2022 Carifta Games held at the National Stadium in Kingston

Meantime, Garth Gayle, President of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA), in describing the development as saddening, has indicated that his administration is planning to appeal the World Athletics decision to not ratify the record.

“We are saddened by the situation that four young ladies would be denied the record. The matter is still at a sensitive stage and we would have done the necessary appeals. We are still hopeful that the record will be ratified at a later stage,” he said.

World Athletics has rejected the ratification of the world record because not all members of the team were subjected to doping control. In a lengthy statement Wednesday, (JADCO) sought to explain the circumstances under which they failed to test all four members of the relay team.

“The event was won by the Jamaican team which was comprised of four female athletes. They completed the race with a world record of 42.58. Doping Control was conducted immediately on three of the female athletes,” the JADCO statement said.

“Since one of the athletes was already tested on the 16th of April 2022, a urine sample was not collected from this athlete on the 17th of April 2022. It is customary and in JADCO’s Best Practice in-competition, that if an athlete is tested today in-competition, the said athlete would not be tested the following day in-competition.”

JADCO claims it was instructed to carry out a specific number of tests for each day of the three-day championships that were being held in Jamaica for the first time since 2011.

“The Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission (JADCO) was contracted by the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) to 18 urine samples throughout the period of the 49th staging of the CARIFTA Games. The Commission was advised to carry 6 urine tests per day with testing being done on any athlete who achieved a national/world record.

On April 16, 2022, six athletes were tested – three Jamaican female athletes, two male Jamaican athletes and one male athlete from the Bahamas.

On April 17, the day the world record was broken, JADCO tested nine athletes – six Jamaican female athletes, one Jamaican male athlete, one female athlete from the US Virgin Islands and one male athlete from the Bahamas.

Six more athletes were tested on April 18, 2022 – three Jamaican male athletes, one Jamaican female athlete, one male athlete from Curacao and one female athlete from the Bahamas.

Going forward, JADCO said they will ensure that all athletes breaking records would be tested.

“The Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission has recognized that World Athletics has declined to accept the result of the record-breaking performance of Jamaica’s Women’s U20 4x100m relay team on April 17, 2022, since one of the athletes previously tested by JADCO on April 16, 2022, was not tested on the day the record was broken,” the JADCO statement said.

“Whilst our testing conforms with the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) protocols, going forward JADCO will ensure the testing of record-breaking athletes despite the frequency of testing.”

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Jamaica’s Women’s U20 4x100m relay team has been denied the ratification of the world record set at the 2022 Carifta Games at the National Stadium in Kingston in April.

The record of 42.58 set by Serena Cole, Brianna Lyston, Tia and Tina Clayton while winning gold on April 17, 2022, will not be ratified, World Athletics said, because ‘not all team members were subjected to doping control’ at the completion of the race.

The Executive Director of the Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission (JADCO) did not respond to calls from Sportsmax.TV. JADCO was responsible for anti-doping controls during the championships/

 Chairman of the JADCO Board Alexander Williams was unable to comment on the matter when he spoke with Sportsmax.TV Wednesday morning. However, he promised to respond to questions once he received the relevant information pertaining to the matter.

Calls to Garth Gayle, President of the Jamaica Athletic Administrative Association (JAAA) went unanswered.

Despite the setback, Jamaica still holds the U20 world record. At the World U20 Championships in Kenya in August 2021, Serena Cole, Tina and Tia Clayton as well as Kerrica Hill established a time of 42.94, which was the time surpassed at the National Stadium in Kingston last month.

Botswana’s Letsile Tebogo’s U20 record of 9.96 set in Gaborone on April 22, was also not ratified because no zero gun test was performed for the timing equipment.”

The Jamaica Administrative Athletics Association (JAAA) has pledged $3 million for its four-part Jubilee Series for senior athletes in a lead up to the World Championships to be held in July this year. 

The second meet will be held this Saturday, May 7 at the National Stadium starting at 5pm. 

The remaining events scheduled for May 7, 21 and June 4 will feature: 100m M/W, 200m M/W, 400m M/W, 400mH M/W, 100mH W, 110mH M, Long Jump (M/W), Discus (W/M).

“Track and field has been a major part of Jamaica’s history, and in the 60th year, we will continue to provide suitable competition for our senior athletes,” says JAAA President Garth Gayle.

“We thought we should offer our senior athletes an opportunity to sharpen their performances for the National Championships and other professional outings leading into the World Championships in July,” he added.

The events will be at the National Stadium and will run for two hours on each occasion running from 5 - 7 pm. As part of the offer, the JAAA will allow its dedicated fans to enter the Grandstand free of cost. 

The event is being held in partnership with the Sport Development Foundation (SDF) and PUMA.  

 

Garth Gayle, President of the Jamaica Athletic Administrative Association and Jamaica’s sports minister Olivia Grange have hailed Elaine Thompson-Herah on her historic win of the Laureus Sportswoman of the Year Award on Sunday.

No Jamaican female athlete had ever taken home the prestigious award that began in 2000.

The Jamaican sprint queen won on the back of her historic achievements last summer when she became the first woman in Olympic history to win the 100/200m sprint double at consecutive Olympic Games and added a third gold medal to her trophy case when she ran the second leg of Jamaica’s 4x100m relay team that won in a national record of 41.02.

She would go on to create even more history when she ran times of 10.54 to become the second-fastest woman of all time while winning the 100m in Eugene, Oregon, and then added times of 10.64 and 10.65 to be the only woman to run faster than 10.7 on four occasions.

Her achievements topped USA’s Allyson Felix (athletics), Australia’s Ashleigh Barty (tennis), Australia’s Emma McKeon (swimming) and USA’s Katie Ledecky and drew praise from the JAAA and the Jamaican government.

"Becoming the second Jamaican and the first female to win the prestigious Laureus Award is a significant achievement for Elaine and by extension Jamaica,” said Gayle.

“This is also a boost for women in track and field and other sports to aim for the highest. We are particularly proud of Elaine for her continuous achievements on and off the track. This definitely sets the tone for a great year for all our athletes.”

Meanwhile, in a missive from the United Kingdom where she will launch the Jamaica 60 programme of activities in the United Kingdom on Monday evening, Minister Grange said Thompson-Herah was most deserving of the honour of “best athlete in the world”.

“This latest success for the fastest woman alive is a tribute to Thompson-Herah’s hard work and sacrifice,” Minister Grange said.

Thompson-Herah is the second Jamaican to win the award. Usain Bolt, won the Laureus Sportsman of the Year in 2009, 2010, 2013 and 2017.

 

 

 

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