Following her electrifying run that resulted in a new world record at the Millrose Games in New York on Sunday, Bahamian sprint hurdler Devynne Charlton is poised to rewrite the record books again, perhaps as early as next month at the World Indoor Championships in Glasgow, Scotland.’

Charlton stunned the sellout crowd at the Millrose Games with a jaw-dropping time of 7.67 seconds that shattered the previous world record of 7.68 seconds set by Sweden's Susanna Kallur back in 2008.

In a post-race interview, Charlton said she wasn’t surprised at the time she ran, indicating that training has been going really well. Rolando ‘Ronnie’ Greene, the Head Track Coach at the University of Kentucky and mastermind behind Charlton's remarkable journey, was also not surprised by the performance revealing that she ran that all-time best while still having the effects of heavy training in her legs.

"It was not a surprise at all. I told her and her training mate, Masai Russell; I said to them, one of you going to break the world record, you have to decide which one is going to do that,” he emphasized, highlighting the rigorous training and unwavering dedication that paved the way for Charlton's historic performance. "Just the things she's been doing in practice; the numbers she's been putting up... I knew the world record was going to fall,” said Greene, who has seen Charlton produce times of 7.88, 7.82, 7.75 and 7.76 heading into New York on Sunday.

“The only thing that we did differently (last week) was I didn't let her pull sled. That's the only thing we did, everything else remain the same. Normally on Mondays we would do some contrast work where we're pulling sleds for four to six times 40 metres with 90 seconds recovery. That's the only thing I took off the plate before this past week before she went to New York. Everything else remained the same, the same amount of volume, the same amount of hurdling.”

He said he made a few tweaks to her technique after her run in Boston the week before she ran on Sunday.

Greene, who has coached Charlton ever since she was standout athlete at Purdue University and who has now given him his first world record, told Sportsmax.TV that she has been racking up scary numbers in training all season.

She's stronger, she's lighter, she's doing things that she's never done. The power to weight ratio in terms of her body weight to what she's cleaning, to what she's squatting is through the ceiling right now. Devynne is five feet, three, 3 1/2 inches. She was 126 lbs last year, she's now 119. She paralleled 325 lbs in a squat and she pulled right at 200 lbs in a clean, so that's almost doubling her body weight. However, you want to put it is much greater, she's never been able to do that before.”

These startling numbers are among the reasons why he feels she will be even faster when she lines up in the 60m hurdles next month.

“We'll do a small taper for Glasgow, I think. People will say, you're not saying this, but I believe she can she can threaten the world record. I think she's got another half a 10th in there or something.”

With the Olympic Games in Paris less than six months away, Greene also believes that this is the year when Charlton should be among the medals, if not at the very top of the podium. She was seventh at the Olympic Games in Tokyo and seventh at the World Championships in Oregon a year later.

In Budapest in 2023, she came closest to a place on the podium when she finished fourth. This time, things are likely to be a lot different. "I truly believe that she is going to be a major factor going forward. She is at that right age of 27/28 when I think athletes hit their peak, their prime, she is at that point,” Greene opined.

“In life, there is a timing that God releases in our lives to accomplish things when we stay the course and I think this is that timing.”

He revealed that when she finished fourth in Budapest last year, in her disappointment, she told him she wished she hadn’t come so close. “She said I wish I was sixth and I said ‘no, baby girl, the devil is alive. You got fourth it just wasn’t your time and when that time arrives, no one can stop it. Nothing or no one can stop it.”

Charlton will race next in Madrid before returning to her training base for a few days of training before they depart for Glasgow.

 

 

Bahamian Devynne Charlton was not surprised by her record-breaking performance in the women’s 60m hurdles at the 2024 Millrose Games in New York on Sunday.

The 2022 World Indoor Championships silver medallist produced a stunning 7.67 to win and establish a new world record in the event, breaking the previous mark of 7.68 done back in 2008 by Sweden’s Susanna Kallur in Germany.

“I knew it was in me. I knew the type of numbers I’ve been putting up in practice but it was all about just executing it,” said the 2022 Commonwealth Games silver medallist in a post-race interview.

Charlton, who is currently training in Lexington, Kentucky and being coached by Rolando “Lonnie” Greene, has been in sensational form to start her 2024 indoor season. The 28-year-old produced 7.88 to win at the UK Rod McCrary Memorial on January 13 before, eight days later, running 7.75 for victory at the Corky Classic.

She then produced 7.76 to win at the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix in Boston on February 4. She credited the race at the Corky Classic as the one that made her know she was in world record shape.

“I think early on we were just trying to see where we were at and get an idea of what was going on,” she said.

“After my second meet when I ran 7.75, I went to my coach and said that was a sloppy race and so I knew once we went back and started working on it, this race would show up. I thought I could’ve got it in Boston but once I didn’t get it so once I went back to practice, the focus was on executing that perfect race,” she added.

 The main difference between her races in Boston and New York, according to Charlton, was being more “locked in.”

“All I was thinking about was just executing the start. I did that and it was just a blur. I knew I crossed the line first,” she said.

“I was anticipating the time and I thought I heard him say world record and didn’t really catch it until everyone got so excited, started to embrace me and started jumping up and down so I thought I must’ve done something special. It didn’t really hit me until they brought me around to the clock and I saw my name and world record,” added Charlton.

She said the thought of breaking the world indoor record has been on her mind for a long time but, after her performance at the 2023 World Championships in Budapest, it became her main focus coming into 2024.

She got to the final of the 100m hurdles in Budapest but just missed out on a medal, finishing fourth in 12.52.

“At the World Championships when I finished fourth place, just outside of a medal, it was a really disappointing feeling and one of the first things I said to my coach when I went back to the warm-up area was now I have to break the world record indoor,” she said.

“This has been a goal for a while but that moment was when we really put a plan in place. We went back and looked at everything I did indoor and outdoor last year, focused on my weak points and built on that in practice,” she added.

As for when fans can expect to see Charlton in action again, “we’re going to stick to the plan. Madrid in two weeks and the World Championships in three,” was her response.

 

In a significant move to amplify her brand and broaden her horizons, Jamaican sprint phenomenon Briana Williams has officially signed with 7venz Media Agency. The announcement comes on the heels of her performance at the 2024 Millrose Games in New York, where she secured a fourth-place finish in the highly competitive 60m dash with a time of 7.25 seconds.

Turning 22 in March, Williams boasts an impressive athletic resume, including a gold medal as a vital member of Jamaica's 4x100m relay team at the Tokyo Olympics. Additionally, she clinched silver medals at the World Athletics Championships in Oregon 2022 and Budapest 2023 as a key contributor to Jamaica's formidable sprint squad.

Williams, who achieved the sprint double at the World U20 championships in Tampere, Finland, in 2018, expressed her excitement about the collaboration with 7venz Media Agency. "I'm elated to have such a talented and dedicated team supporting me. Their expertise and passion are unparalleled, and I'm confident that together, we'll achieve great things."

The media agency, known for its representation of World 100m hurdles champion Danielle Williams, warmly welcomed Briana to their esteemed roster. "Briana is an exceptional talent, and we're honored to be a part of her journey. Our team is committed to helping her build a strong brand and showcasing her unique talent to the world."

This strategic partnership marks a new chapter in Williams' flourishing career, providing her with the resources and expertise to navigate the ever-evolving landscape of sports and entertainment. As she continues to make waves on the track, fans can anticipate exciting developments and innovative projects in the coming months.

Marathon world record holder Kelvin Kiptum and his coach have died in an accident in Kenya, it has been announced.

Kenyan member of parliament Gideon Kimaiyo confirmed the pair’s death in a statement on X.

Mr Kimaiyo said: “It is with heavy hearts that we learn of the passing of Kelvin Kiptum, the world marathon record holder, and his coach in a tragic accident along the Eldoret-Kaptagat road.

“Kelvin Kiptum was at the prime of his career, a legend in his own right. It’s a tough one to take.

“Our thoughts are with their families during this incredibly difficult time. The people of Keiyo South are saddened by this loss. May their souls rest in eternal peace.”

Kiptum, 24, set a new world record of two hours and 35 seconds at the Chicago Marathon in October last year.

He also won the London Marathon in 2023 with a record time of two hours, one minute and 25 seconds.

The organisers of the London Marathon said on X: “We are shocked and deeply saddened to hear the terrible news of the death of marathon world record holder Kelvin Kiptum and his coach, Gervais Hakizimana.

“The thoughts of everyone at the TCS London Marathon are with Kelvin’s and Gervais’ family and friends.”

World Athletics president Seb Coe said: “We are shocked and deeply saddened to learn of the devastating loss of Kelvin Kiptum and his coach, Gervais Hakizimana.

“On behalf of all at World Athletics, we send our deepest condolences to their families, friends, teammates and the Kenyan nation.

“It was only earlier this week in Chicago, the place where Kelvin set his extraordinary marathon World Record, that I was able to officially ratify his historic time.

“An incredible athlete leaving an incredible legacy, we will miss him dearly.”

At the 2022 Valencia Marathon, Kiptum set the record for the fastest debut marathon in history, crossing the line in a course record of two hours, one minute and 53 seconds.

He was due to compete at the Rotterdam Marathon in April, which would have been his first event since setting the world record.

Julien Alfred continued her show of force this indoor season on Sunday when she blazed to a world-leading time to win the 60m dash at the 2024 Millrose Games in New York. The 22-year-old St Lucian star sped to a time of 6.99 eclipsing the 7.01 run in Poland by Ewa Swoboda on February 6.

The time also a meet and facility record and further establishes Alfred position as being among the best of the world’s elite women sprinters. She is the first woman under seven seconds this indoor season after breaking the hallowed barrier three times last season during her final NCAA season.

There was daylight between Alfred and the in-form Shashalee Forbes of Jamaica, who was the runner-up in 7.14.

Destiny Smith-Barnett of the USA finished third in 7.16 while Briana Williams was fourth in 7.25.

Meanwhile, Christian Coleman of the USA won the men’s equivalent in 6.51 just managing to hold off Hakim Sani-Brown of Japan (6.54) and Akeem Blake of Jamaica, who overcame a poor start to finish third in 6.55.

Ryiem Forde of Jamaica was fourth in a personal best of 6.60.

In a display of explosive speed and flawless execution Bahamian Devynne Charlton set a new world record in the 60m hurdles at the 2024 Millrose Games in New York on Sunday.

Racing against a stacked field that included world champion Danielle Williams and former world leader Tia Jones and last season’s NCAA 100m hurdles champion Ackera Nugent, Charlton exploded from the blocks and surged to the lead early. She flashed across the line in an astonishing 7.67 a new world record and national record. She broke the previous record of 7.68 held by Sweden's Susanna Kallur since 2008.

Williams, whose focus is on the Paris Olympics this summer, ran a season-best 7.79 for second place with Jones clocking the same time for third.

Nugent also ran a season-best 7.80 for fourth place in the keenly contested event.

Olympic bronze medalist Megan Tapper was seventh in a personal best 7.98.

 

In a moment of pure exhilaration, Jamaica's female hammer thrower, Erica Belvit, shattered Jamaica's national weight throw indoor record during the URI Coaches Invitational at Rhode Island on Saturday. The impressive throw of 23.08m not only secured her place in the record books but also marked a significant milestone in her quest for a spot at the upcoming Paris Olympics.

The mark, if ratified, will eclipse the record of 22.95m set by Kim Barnett in March 2004. Erica was a class above her competition that included her younger sister Hope, a senior at Northeastern, who was a distant second with her best throw of 17.92m.

Megan Wood, a junior of Rhode Island was third with 17.02m.

Erica, overwhelmed with emotion, shared her immediate reaction to the record-breaking moment, saying, "I was jumping and screaming! I didn’t expect it; I just knew something was going to happen for sure! I have so much in the tank ready to go."

The achievement comes after meticulous preparation, with Belvit and her coach, Wilfredo de Jesus Elias, dedicating their focus exclusively to the hammer throw and outdoor events in the lead-up to the 2024 track and field season. The URI Coaches Invitational served as a platform to fine-tune her competition mindset after a hiatus from competing.

Reflecting on her preparation for the season, Belvit mentioned, “This meet was just to ‘shake some dust off’ and practice getting into that competition mindset since I haven’t competed since July."

The disappointment of being overlooked for Jamaica's team at the World Athletics Championships in Budapest in 2023 fueled Belvit's determination to make her mark in Paris this summer. Addressing the setback, she expressed, "Yes, it changed my whole view of training and competing. I was heartbroken for some time. Now we move forward."

Despite a challenging off-season marked by illness, Belvit's mental fortitude and patience played a pivotal role in her development. She shared insights into her off-season journey, stating, "My off-season started pretty rocky. I had gotten sick, which delayed my start for several weeks. When I was able to start training again, we focused on recovery and gradually increasing my training. I grew so much mentally during that time because I had to be patient with my body."

Looking ahead, Belvit has set ambitious yet straightforward targets for the season. Her focus is on giving her all each day, without regrets or holding back, believing that this approach will propel her toward success.

The 23-metre throw represents a significant step forward for Belvit and her coach. She sees it as evidence that their hard work is paying off and that they are heading in the right direction. As she shifts her attention to outdoor competitions, Belvit is eager to continue her journey, armed with newfound confidence and the belief that she has more to offer in pursuit of Olympic glory in Paris.

World Championship 400m hurdles finalist and Jamaican national record holder Roshawn Clarke produced an upset in heat five of the men’s 400m at Saturday’s Camperdown Classic at the National Stadium in Kingston with a win over reigning World 400m champion Antonio Watson.

Swept Track Club’s Clarke, the current World U-20 record holder in the 400m hurdles, started the race in lane five while Racers Track Club’s Watson was in lane four.

It was a contrast in starts to the race for the two with Clarke going out hard over the first 300m and Watson going out in his usual reserved style.

The final 100m saw Clarke, who is still only 19 and doesn’t turn 20 until July, using his 400m hurdles strength to narrowly hold off a fast-finishing Watson.

In what was the first race of the season for both men, Clarke’s winning time was 46.05 while Watson ran 46.10 in second. Terry Thomas of Titans International was third in 46.97.

Watson is looking to build on a 2023 season that saw him run 44.22 to claim his maiden World 400m title in Budapest last August. Clarke also had a fantastic maiden World Championships. He produced a national record and world U-20 record 47.34 in the semi-finals of the 400m hurdles before finishing fourth in the final with a 48.07 effort.

Heat four saw two-time World Championship 100m finalist Oblique Seville of Racers Track Club produce a personal best 47.44 to open his season with a win. Titans International and Antigua & Barbuda’s Darion Skerritt ran a personal best 48.43 in second while Calabar’s Craig Prendergast, also hailing from Antigua & Barbuda, ran 48.49, also a personal best in third.

Heat three was won by Racers Track Club’s Kuron Griffith in a personal best 48.79 ahead of Swept Track Club’s Jalan Bennett (50.29) and Mico University College’s Quentin McLean (50.59).

Racers Track Club had the top three finishers in heat two. Guyana’s Shamar Horatio won in a personal best 49.02 ahead of Jamaican national U-20 100m record holder Bouwahjgie Nkrumie (49.73) and Adrian Taffe (50.27). Both Nkrumie and Taffe ran personal bests.

Elite Performance Track Club’s Waseem Williams ran a personal best 49.71 to win the first heat. Swept Track Club’s Junior Harris was second with a personal best 50.91 while York Castle’s Jerrain Hunter ran a personal best 51.74 in third.

The women’s invitational 400m final was won by Elite Performance’s Kerrica Hill in a personal best 56.26 ahead of Ferncourt’s Alliea Whitter (59.36) and Serena Richard of Legacy Athletics (59.84).

 

 

Trinidad & Tobago’s Eric Harrison Jr and Antigua & Barbuda’s Joella Lloyd took home wins in the men’s and women’s 60m, respectively, on day one at the Clemson Tiger Paw Invitational at Clemson University in South Carolina on Friday.

Harrison Jr, 24, produced a personal best of 6.59 to win the men’s event ahead of Kasaun James (6.61) and Tennessee Sophomore T’Mars McCallum (6.63).

The American-born Harrison Jr’s previous personal best was 6.67 done in January 2022. That year also saw Harrison Jr claim the 100m title at T&T’s National Championships with a personal best 10.08 at the Hasely Crawford Stadium.

The women’s equivalent saw Antiguan Olympian and Tennessee Senior Joella Lloyd win in a season’s best 7.27, just ahead of American Maia McCoy (7.29) in second and Kentucky Junior Victoria Perrow (7.31).

In the field, Jamaican Florida State Sophomore Jordan Turner produced 7.90m for second in the men’s long jump behind schoolmate Jeremiah Davis’ season’s best and facility record 8.20m. American Cameron Crump was third with 7.88m.

Day one at the 2024 Tyson Invitational in Fayetteville, Arkansas on Friday saw a number of Caribbean athletes producing excellent performances.

Perhaps the best performance on the day came from 2022 Commonwealth 110m hurdles champion Rasheed Broadbell.

The 23-year-old produced a personal best 7.56 to take the men’s 60m hurdles ahead of countryman Tyler Mason who ran a personal best 7.65 in second. LSU Sophomore Matthew Sophia was third in 7.67, also a personal best.

The women’s 60m Open saw a Caribbean top three as Tina Clayton won ahead of twin sister Tia with Bahamian Anthonique Strachan finishing third. Tina’s winning time was a season’s best 7.25 while Tia’s time in second was 7.28 and Strachan’s in third was 7.30.

The men’s equivalent saw reigning Jamaican National 100m champion Rohan Watson run 6.76 to finish as runner up behind American Lawrence Johnson who ran 6.70. Another American, Tony Brown, ran a personal best 6.78 in third while Jamaica’s Michael Campbell ran 6.80 in fourth.

The College men’s 60m saw Bahamian Florida Sophomore Wanya McCoy produce a personal best 6.65 to finish second behind LSU Sophomore Myles Thomas (6.62). Thomas’s teammate, Godson Oghenebrume, also ran 6.65 in third.

The women’s College 400m saw Jamaican National champion Nickisha Pryce produce a personal best 51.04 to take the win. Her time also puts her #3 on the all-time Jamaican indoor list.

The Arkansas Junior finished ahead of her schoolmate Kaylyn Brown who ran a personal best 51.49 for second while Rosey Effiong completed the Arkansas 1-2-3 with 51.65 in third.

The women’s Open 400m saw Lanae-Tava Thomas and Stacey Ann Williams run 51.88 and 52.33 for second and third, respectively. American Alexis Holmes won in a meet record 50.80. Another Jamaican, Andrenette Knight, ran 52.68 in fourth.

In the field, 2019 World champion and national record holder, Tajay Gayle, opened his season with 8.15m to finish second in the men’s long jump. Gayle, who also took bronze at the World Championships in Budapest last year, also produced a 7.99m effort in his series on Friday.

The event was won by Florida Senior Malcolm Clemons with 8.17m while Bahamian Laquan Nairn produced 7.93m for third.

 

 

In a display of international athleticism, junior and senior athletes from five countries are gearing up for the highly anticipated 51st edition of the Gibson/McCook Relays scheduled to take place on Saturday, February 24, 2024. With participation confirmed from The Bahamas, Canada, St Kitts Nevis, Trinidad & Tobago, and the USA, this year's relays promise to be a thrilling spectacle at the National Stadium in Kingston.

Canadian teams are set to make a strong showing, with junior athletes representing the Brampston Racers and Flying Angels in the 4 x 100m and 4 x 200mh relays. Meanwhile, Bishop Anstey and Queens College from Trinidad & Tobago will field talented girls and boys teams in the sprint relays, including the 4 x 100m, 4 x 200m, and 4 x 400m events.

St Kitts Nevis is expected to make a mark in the high jump category, showcasing the diverse range of talents that will be on display. The Bahamas will be represented by a formidable 4 x 100m male club team, adding a layer of excitement to the relay competitions.

The USA teams are gearing up for intense competition, particularly in the sprint and mile relays, adding a strong international flavor to the event. These overseas athletes will join over 2,000 participants registered for the 51st staging of the Gibson/McCook Relays, making it a true celebration of track and field excellence.

One of the notable additions to this year's event is the introduction of the 4 x 400m mixed relays high school open event, bringing a fresh and exciting element to the competition. Schools participating in the ISSA Boys and Girls Championships scheduled for March 19-23 will also have the opportunity to earn qualifying standards for specific events.

The Organizing Committee has secured partnerships for 40 events, reflecting the collaborative effort to ensure the success and vibrancy of the Gibson/McCook Relays. The action is set to commence at 9:30 am, with the last thrilling race scheduled to begin at 8:50 pm, promising an entire day of track and field excitement.

 

 

Jamaica's three-time Olympic champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce says she "owes" it to her family to retire after this summer's Games in Paris.

The 37-year-old, regarded as one of the greatest sprinters of all time, won the 100m title in 2008 and 2012. Fraser-Pryce also won Tokyo 2020 Olympic relay gold, plus three of her 10 world titles, in a comeback after giving birth to her son in 2017.

"There's not a day I'm getting up to go practise and I'm like, 'I'm over this," she told Essence.com.

"My son needs me. My husband and I have been together since before I won in 2008. He has sacrificed for me.

"We're a partnership, a team. And it's because of that support that I'm able to do the things that I have been doing for all these years. And I think I now owe it to them to do something else," she added.

On that note, Fraser-Pryce pointed out that this year's Olympics in Paris were about "showing people that you stop when you decide.

"I want to finish on my own terms," she declared.

In total, Fraser-Pryce has won three Olympic golds, four silvers and a bronze.

Three Jamaican female athletes have once again stamped their mark on the prestigious Bowerman Watch List for the week of February 7, 2024. Lamara Distin, Brianna Lyston, and Ackelia Smith have earned well-deserved spots on the coveted list, showcasing their exceptional prowess in the world of collegiate athletics.

The Bowerman Award, presented annually to the most outstanding NCAA male and female athletes in the USA, is a testament to the incredible talent and hard work displayed by these athletes. The recent announcement follows the historic achievement in 2023, where two Caribbean athletes, Jaydon Hibbert and Julien Alfred, claimed the coveted award for the first time ever.

Lyston's inclusion in the list is particularly noteworthy as she joins teammates Alia Armstrong and Michaela Rose, making LSU the eighth program to place at least three athletes on the same Women’s Watch List.

From Portmore, Jamaica, Lyston won the 60m dash at the Razorback Invitational in 7.07 becoming number four all-time on the collegiate list. She has also run 7.14 in a 60m prelim as well as 23.16 in the 200. Lyston is the 12th athlete in LSU women’s history to be named to the Watch List.

Distin, representing Texas A&M, returns to the Watch List after an impressive high jump clearance of 1.94m at the Ted Nelson Invitational. With a personal record of 1.97m indoors, Distin aims to secure her third consecutive NCAA DI Indoor crown, adding to her already illustrious career. Her PR of 1.97m indoors puts her number three all-time. This is her eighth career Watch List appearance.

Smith, hailing from Clarendon, Jamaica, has showcased her versatility by dominating the long jump event so far this season. With a series of impressive leaps, including a 6.85m victory at the New Mexico Collegiate Classic, Smith is making her mark as a force to be reckoned with in collegiate track and field.

Last year’s NCAA DI Outdoor long jump champion, Smith is number two all-time collegiately at 7.08m and also has chops in the triple jump – an event she hasn’t contested this year but rates No. 3 all-time outdoors 14.54m and No. 5 indoors (14.29m. This is her fourth career Watch List appearance.

 The next Bowerman Watch List will be announced on February 28.

Damion Thomas of Jamaica and Charisma Taylor of the Bahamas showcased their athletic prowess at the 2024 edition of the Meeting de Mondeville in France on Wednesday, claiming victory in their respective hurdles events.

Thomas, who has had his issues with injuries in the past couple of years, stormed to a close victory in the 60m hurdles, winning in a time of 7.63. The time reflected a level of consistency from the Jamaican, who was only 0.02 slower than the 7.61 he ran on Saturday when he notched his first win as a professional athlete.

Not far behind was Elmo Lakka. The Fin clocked 7.68 for second place with Mikdat Sevler of Turkey trailing in third in 7.78.

It was a much easier affair for Taylor in the women’s sprint hurdles event. The Bahamian was a comfortable winner in 7.94. However, the battle for second place between Sidonie Fiadnanantsoa and Yumi Tanaka was much closer with the athlete from Madagascar being awarded second place having been determined to be ahead by a few hundredths of a second ahead of the Japanese hurdler.

 

Jamaican sprinter Shashalee Forbes followed up her 60m win at the ISTAF Indoor Dusseldorf in Germany on Sunday with a third-place finish at the ORLEN Copernicus Cup- A World Athletics Indoor Tour- Gold event in Torun, Poland on Tuesday.

Compared to the top two finishers, Poland’s Ewa Swoboda and Italy’s Zaynab Dosso, Forbes got a poor start and never really recovered, eventually finishing a distant third in 7.13.

Swoboda’s winning time was a meet record and world-leading 7.01 while Dosso ran 7.02, a personal best, in second.

Forbes’ time was her third fastest in the event this season. In addition to her 7.11 to win in Germany on Sunday, the 27-year-old ran 7.03 to win at the Queens Grace Jackson Meet at the National Stadium in Kingston on January 27.

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