Six athletes – Tigist Assefa, Mondo Duplantis, Kelvin Kiptum, Faith Kipyegon, Noah Lyles and Yulimar Rojas – have been announced as World Athletes of the Year for 2023.


The world champions and world record-breakers were the final winners to be revealed as part of the World Athletics Awards 2023 on Monday (11), following confirmation of this year’s Rising Stars: world 3000m steeplechase bronze medallist Faith Cherotich and world 800m silver medallist Emmanuel Wanyonyi.


The adaptation of the World Athlete of the Year honours awarded this year follows feedback received during the voting process. Many sensational performances – including an extraordinary 23 world records* – were achieved in 2023. When it came to compiling the votes, athletes, fans and World Athletics Family members commented that it was incredibly hard to limit the vote to just one athlete, because of the various disciplines and the vast differences in skill sets required. As a result, for 2023 the World Athlete of the Year awards have been divided into three event categories: track, field and out of stadia.


“The depth of talent and the outstanding performances in our sport this year more than justify the expansion of the World Athletics Awards to recognise the accomplishments by these six athletes across a range of disciplines,” said World Athletics President Sebastian Coe. “Our World Athletes of the Year alone have achieved seven world records between them in 2023, as well as a host of world titles and major wins, so it is only fitting that they be recognised as the athletes of the year in their respective fields.


“I congratulate our award winners and all of the athletes nominated for these honours.”


World Athletes of the Year for 2023

Women’s track: Faith Kipyegon, KEN, 1500m/mile/5000m
Women’s field: Yulimar Rojas, VEN, triple jump
Women’s out of stadia: Tigist Assefa, ETH, marathon
Men’s track: Noah Lyles, USA, 100m/200m
Men’s field: Mondo Duplantis, SWE, pole vault
Men’s out of stadia: Kelvin Kiptum, KEN, marathon


Assefa, Duplantis, Kiptum and Kipyegon set world records in their respective events in 2023, while all six World Athletes of the Year secured world titles or major marathon wins.

 

 


The moment of the year for Assefa came at the BMW Berlin Marathon in September, when the Ethiopian 27-year-old ran 2:11:53, smashing the world record by two minutes and 14 seconds and achieving the biggest single improvement on the mark for 40 years.


She finished almost six minutes ahead of her nearest rival after clocking 1:06:20 for the first half and an even faster 1:05:33 for the second half – a time that just seven women have beaten this year in a standalone half marathon.


Kiptum also achieved his world record in a World Athletics Platinum Label road race, running 2:00:35 at the Bank of America Chicago Marathon in October. Becoming the first athlete to break 2:01 in a record-eligible marathon, the 24-year-old Kenyan won the race by almost three and a half minutes and took 34 seconds off Eliud Kipchoge’s previous world record.


Just one year on from his marathon debut, Kiptum now has three of the seven fastest times in history to his name having also won the TCS London Marathon in April in 2:01:25.


Duplantis improved his world pole vault record both indoors and outdoors in 2023, while he also retained the world title and achieved 20 clearances of 6.00m or higher.

 


Indoors, the Swedish 24-year-old added a centimetre to his previous outright best, clearing 6.22m in Clermont-Ferrand. During the outdoor season, he secured his second consecutive world title in Budapest and then won his third Wanda Diamond League trophy with a clearance of 6.23m on his first attempt to better his world record by another centimetre.


Kipyegon set world records at an incredible three distances during a season in which she also achieved a golden double at the World Athletics Championships Budapest 23.


First, the 29-year-old Kenyan improved the world 1500m record to 3:49.11 in Florence, taking almost a full second off the previous mark. Just one week later, and despite having raced the 5000m just twice before, she improved the world record for that event, too, clocking 14:05.20 in Paris to shave 1.42 seconds from the old record. Her third world record came in Monaco, where she smashed the previous mile mark by five seconds, clocking 4:07.64. Then, in Budapest, she won her third senior world 1500m title and her first world 5000m crown.


Lyles also achieved an individual title double at the World Championships in Budapest, winning 100m gold and retaining his 200m title before forming part of USA’s victorious 4x100m team.


The 26-year-old won the 100m in 9.83 – which saw him end the season as joint world leader – and the 200m in 19.52. He went even faster at the Diamond League meeting in London, clocking 19.47 to maintain his position as world 200m leader for the sixth consecutive year, during a season in which he was undefeated in six 200m finals.


Rojas won her fourth world outdoor title in Budapest and the Venezuelan 28-year-old also claimed her third consecutive Diamond League trophy.


Despite being in eighth place going into the final round at the World Championships, the world record-holder kept her cool and managed to soar 15.08m with her final attempt, moving her into the lead by eight centimetres. That secured her an eighth global gold medal. Then, at the Diamond League Final in Eugene, she improved her world lead to 15.35m for a mark just 39cm off her own world record.

 

 

 

 

 

 In a splendid affair at the luxurious Marriott Hotel in Aventura, the Pan American Sport Organization (PASO) held its Gala Awards Ceremony recently, hosting a distinguished guest and 400m hurdles gold medalist, Jaheel Hyde, who was celebrated for his remarkable achievement at the 2023 Pan American Games.

The event became more than a gala; it transformed into a Wolmerian reunion, bringing together Jamaica Olympic Association (JOA) President Christopher Samuda, and JOA Secretary General/CEO, Ryan Foster, both maroon and gold alumni and esteemed PASO commission members.

The reunion was elevated with the presence of Jaheel Hyde, a Wolmer's Boys' School alumnus, whose stellar performance on the international stage earned him the prestigious 400m hurdles gold.

Jaheel Hyde, adorned with numerous gold medals from his junior endeavors and the 2022 Commonwealth Games silver in Birmingham, now sets his sights on the grandest stage of all—the Paris 2024 Olympic Games. The gala served as a moment of recognition for Hyde's historic achievement, marking his first gold at the senior level in international competition.

As Hyde basks in the glory of his Pan Am Games triumph, the journey continues, with the Paris Olympics looming on the horizon. Eager to add another illustrious chapter to his sporting journey, Hyde prepares to face formidable competitors, aspiring to clinch the coveted gold medal and etch his name in the annals of sporting history.

 

Fueled by last season’s frustrations of missing out on the Masters 200m world record, 53-year-old sprinter Garth Robinson made history at the Indiana University Early Bird Indoor Meet on Saturday, shattering Masters Age Group records in both the 60m dash and 200m dash.

In the preliminary round of the 60m dash, Robinson blazed through the track, clocking an extraordinary time of 7.09. This not only secured an American age-group record but also set the stage for an exceptional day of competition. The seasoned sprinter continued his historic run in the 200m dash, posting an unofficial world age-group record time of 22.93.

If ratified, Robinson’s marks will replace Val Barnwell’s record of 7.13 set in 2009 and William Collins’ 200m mark set 22.99 set in March 2003.

In July, Robinson just missed out on Willie Gault’s 200m world outdoor record of 22.44 when he ran 22.59s into a heavy headwind of -1.6m/s at the USATF Masters Outdoor Track and Field Championships in North Carolina. It was a common theme throughout the season.

Robinson, who revealed that he still has Gault’s record as a goal this season, cited the frustration of missing out on the record last season because of unfavourable environmental conditions, as a driving force behind his ambitions for the new season. "So I was a little frustrated saying I can't really get lucky to have the wind behind me. The one time I had the wind behind me, it was too much. That was when I ran a 10.88 (in July)," he shared, highlighting the challenges he faced in outdoor competitions last season.

"These are just personal goals. It's coming from when I used to run back in the day, and you know I've had a few accomplishments that I'm happy for, but I just wanted something more, something more personal, a world record."

Reflecting on his preparation, Robinson explained how he managed to maintain his fitness during the off season. “I was in good shape from the outdoors, I just transitioned with just taking it easy but mindful that I'm still in shape,” he said.

"I play in a volleyball league. Sometimes I mess around doing that and soccer sometimes. So like cross-training is something different from track and field, but I was still lifting, I was still running at the core part of my activities," Robinson added, shedding light on his comprehensive approach to training.

Robinson also got his weight down to something, he said, is more manageable. "Well, so going into Kentucky, which was the first year I did Masters, I was almost 200 lbs., and then when I competed last year, I think I was maybe 173. So I lost a lot of weight, tremendous a lot of weight in a short piece of time," he shared, highlighting the dedication to managing his weight effectively.

The former GC Foster College and Oral Roberts University alum explained that he also worked to tackle some of his shortcomings stating, "One of my weaknesses was my start because, you know, back in the day, I did the 400, and developed a habit of running 300 repeats in which the start doesn't have to be that emphasized."

He detailed the adjustments made to his training, incorporating explosive starts and shorter, more intense workouts.

As he looks ahead, Robinson remains focused on his journey, with an unrelenting determination to achieve his goals. "I plan to run more races. I have one this weekend at Principia College, just up the street from me," the Missouri resident he revealed, emphasizing his commitment to pushing the boundaries of Masters athletics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clemson University’s Indoor Track Facility witnessed a spectacular showcase of Jamaican talent at the Clemson Opener on December 8, 2023.

Shantae Foreman, the former Excelsior High standout renowned for her prowess in the high jump, took on a new challenge making her triple jump debut a memorable one. She leaped an impressive 13.08m  securing the top spot in the women's triple jump event.

Ronasche Fluker of Georgia State University claimed the second spot with a leap of 12.00 m. Foreman's outstanding performance added a layer of excitement to an already spirited day of competition.

Jessica McLean, a sophomore at Clemson, carved her name in the annals of the Clemson Opener with an exceptional display in the women's 1000m event. Setting a personal best of 2:53.59, McLean showcased her speed and stamina, leading the pack.

Marie Forbes, a senior from Clemson, exhibited her strength in the women's weight throw, launching an impressive 21.86m to claim victory.

Daniel Cope, a senior from Clemson, dominated the men's weight throw finals with a mighty throw of 21.31m.

Jamaica’s national 800m record holder, Navasky Anderson, can now also call himself a university graduate after graduating from the Mississippi State University with a Master's Degree on Friday.

Anderson, who became the first and only Jamaican man to go sub 1:45.00 when he ran 1:44.70 at the DC Track Championships in July, began his collegiate career at the Essex Community College in 2019 before transferring to Mississippi State in 2020.

“My time at Mississippi State University has been nothing short of transformative, thanks to the exceptional support from both the athletics and academia staff,” Anderson said in an Instagram post on Friday.

“Juggling the demands of coursework and the rigor of track and field requires a delicate balance, and it’s collaboration between the athletic and academic realms that allowed me to thrive,” he added.

During his time at MSU, Anderson claimed 800m silver at the 2022 NCAA Division 1 Outdoor Championships and represented Jamaica for the first time, with his best result being a bronze medal at this year’s Pan American Games in Chile in November.

The 23-year-old former St. Jago student also donned the Jamaican colors at the 2022 and 2023 World Championships in Eugene and Budapest, respectively, as well as the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham where he placed fifth in the final.

“As I stand here today, wearing the cap and gown that symbolizes the culmination of years of hard work, I extend my deepest gratitude to Mississippi State University Athletics and the academic faculty. Their unwavering support and commitment to my holistic development have been the driving force behind this significant achievement,” Anderson said.

In a star-studded spectacle just before the much-anticipated draw for the 2024 Copa América on Thursday, sprinting legend Usain Bolt took the field alongside football icons such as Ronaldinho Gaúcho in the South American Football Confederation’s (CONMEBOL) Legends Match.

The electrifying game unfolded in the vibrant city of Miami, USA, at the Inter Miami’s DRV PNK Stadium.

Bolt, known for his blazing speed on the track, showcased his skills on the football pitch as he joined forces with luminaries like Colombian maestro Carlos Valderrama and Argentine sharpshooter Sergio ‘Kun’ Agüero. The Jamaican sprint legend documented the memorable experience, sharing snapshots with his teammates on Instagram, most of which were captured in the camaraderie-filled dressing room.

Yet, it was Bolt's interaction with former Barcelona maestro Ronaldinho that set social media ablaze. The charismatic duo, pitted against each other on opposing teams, engaged in a quick chat, leaving fans thrilled. True to his flair, Ronaldinho managed to find the back of the net, securing his team's only goal in a closely contested match that ended with Bolt's team clinching a 2-1 victory.

  

As the final whistle blew, capturing the essence of sportsmanship, Ronaldinho posed for photographs with Bolt, capping off a night of football camaraderie. The beloved Brazilian footballer even took a moment to sign Bolt's jersey before the sprint legend headed back to the dressing room.

Adding to the spectacle, Kasi Bennett, Bolt's longtime spouse, shared glimpses of the Legends Match, posting a short video capturing Bolt's presence on the pitch. The event not only showcased the fusion of speed and skill but also celebrated the spirit of sport that transcends disciplines.

 

 

 

The 7th annual 2C2W World Awards Gala, which took place in the vibrant heart of New York City on December 1, 2023, was a grand celebration of excellence in athletics. The event, attended by renowned figures from sports, academia, and business, illuminated the city with its recognition of extraordinary talent and leadership.

              In the spotlight was Fitz Coleman, the esteemed coach of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics 110m hurdles champion Hansle Parchment. His remarkable guidance and mentorship in the world of track and field, culminating in Olympic glory, were celebrated with fervour. Coleman's acceptance of his award was met with resounding applause, a tribute to his impactful coaching career.

  Peter Zinno, recognized for his significant contributions as the team manager for Team USA at the 2004 Indoor World Championships, was another key figure honoured at the gala. Zinno's expertise in sports management and his strategic leadership in shaping world-class athletic teams were highlighted as exemplary.

  The gala also paid homage to Garth Gayle, the innovative President of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA), and Dr. Warren Blake, a trailblazer in sports medicine. Gayle's and Blake’s respective roles in sports administration and athlete health care were lauded, underscoring the diverse facets of excellence in athletics.

 

              A highlight of the evening was the prestigious honour bestowed upon the JAAA. The JAAA was recognized for its significant contributions to the development and promotion of athletics, both locally and internationally. This accolade was a testament to the JAAA's commitment to fostering talent and elevating the sport to new heights.

 Dr Dorothy Hudson-Gayle, Basset Thompson, Raphael Ney Jean Francois and Michael Higgins were also among the distinguished individuals who were honoured.

 The 2C2W World Awards Gala transcended being merely an award ceremony; it was a unifying event celebrating the spirit of sportsmanship and leadership. Each story shared by the honorees echoed a legacy of hard work, determination, and a commitment to excellence, leaving the audience inspired and looking forward to the future of sports.

Double Olympic champion Dame Kelly Holmes announced her retirement from athletics on this day in 2005.

Holmes had been a regular medallist at middle distance events, including winning bronze over 800 metres at the Sydney Olympics, but injuries had stopped her from hitting the heights until the Athens Games came along in 2004.

At the age of 34, the Kent runner achieved her dream by securing gold in the 800m before claiming her second gold a few days later over 1,500m.

Holmes had planned to bow out at the Commonwealth Games in 2006 but brought forward her retirement plans.

The former army sergeant revealed at a press conference she had been badly affected by the death of a man she met while visiting her physiotherapist in Ireland.

She said: “I met a guy in Ireland called Tim O’Brian, a friend of my physio Gerard Hartmann. We met for lunch and he was full of life. I went back to South Africa and heard two days later from Gerard that he only had four weeks to live.

“He died only a few weeks ago of cancer. I was totally shocked, overwhelmed and uncontrollable in terms of my feelings. Something clicked in my mind. You never know where your life is going so why not make the most of everything?

“I have achieved everything I ever wanted. I am a double Olympic champion. I have nothing to prove to anyone, including myself. I have done and surpassed what other people will continue to dream of.”

Holmes hung up her spikes having won 12 major medals across a 10-year span, including Commonwealth golds over 1,500m in 1994 and 2002.

Since retirement, Holmes has mentored young athletes, worked in TV and as a motivational speaker and written several books. She was made a Dame by Queen Elizabeth II in the New Year’s Honours of 2005 and appointed Honorary Colonel of the Royal Armoured Corps Training Regiment in 2018.

Dominican sprinter Luguelin Santos has been stripped of his World Junior Championships gold medal from 2012 and handed a three-year ban by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) for age-manipulation violations. The AIU revealed this decision on Friday, uncovering Santos's admission to competing with a falsified date of birth during the 2012 World Junior Championships in Barcelona.

 Luguelin Santos, now 31 years old, had clinched the 400-metre gold at the 2012 World Junior Championships when he was just 18. However, the AIU's investigation exposed that Santos had utilized a passport with a manipulated birthdate, claiming to be born on November 12, 1993, when, in reality, his birthdate is November 12, 1992. Consequently, Santos was ineligible to participate in the 2012 World Juniors, as per the competition rules requiring junior athletes to be either 18 or 19 years old on December 31 of the competition year.

 The AIU, in a statement, clarified the gravity of the violation, stating, "Thus, he was ineligible to participate in the World Juniors 2012." The age-manipulation incident tarnished Santos's victory at the championship, leading to the unprecedented decision to strip him of the gold medal.

Santos, a two-time Youth Olympic champion, had furthered his career by claiming a silver medal in the 400m event at the 2012 London Olympics. However, Brett Clothier, Head of the AIU, emphasized that unlike doping violations, age-manipulation sanctions do not warrant the annulment of Olympic results. Clothier explained, "There is no basis on which to annul his Olympic result as that was not an age-group event and no violation was committed there."

 

For her trailblazing exploits in track and field Sada Williams was on Thursday recognized by her home country of Barbados at their Independence Day National Honours ceremony.

Williams, who turns 26 on Friday, is a back-to-back World Championship 400m bronze medallist and is the first Barbadian women to win a medal at a global championship. She won a bronze medal in the 400m at the 2022 World Championships in Eugene, Oregon and repeated the feat at the 2023 Championships in Budapest, Hungary in August. In so doing she became the first Barbadian athlete to win a global medal at consecutive championships.

She also won the 400m at the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England and took home a silver medal at the NACAC Championships that same year.

For that and more, she was awarded The Gold Trident of Excellence Award in recognition of her outstanding achievements and dedicated service to her country. It was an honour to be appreciated, she said.

“I feel very honoured to be recognized this year and last year and I am hoping to continue to do great things reach further,” said Williams who was attending the Independence Day Parade for the very first time.

The race for Jamaica's Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year for 2023 has officially begun, with the announcement of the nominees on Wednesday. The 63rd RJR Sports Foundation Women and Men Athletes of the Year will see a fierce competition among some of the nation's top athletic talents, with World Athletics Championships gold medallists Shericka Jackson, Danielle Williams, and Antonio Watson among the standout contenders.

The nominees for the People's Choice Award include Jackson's impressive 200m victory, Williams' triumph in the 100m hurdles, and Watson's groundbreaking performance at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest. The anticipation for these accolades is high, considering the outstanding achievements of these athletes on the global stage.

The winners of the prestigious awards will be unveiled during a ceremony scheduled for January 19, 2024. Jackson, who is considered a heavy favorite to secure the award she shared with Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce in 2022, showcased another stellar season, adding a silver medal in the 100m at the World Championships in Budapest. Her exceptional form was highlighted by securing the Diamond League 100m and 200m titles in Eugene, Oregon.

Williams, too, enjoyed a remarkable year, surprising many by claiming victory in the 100m hurdles in Budapest, where she outperformed formidable rivals such as Jasmine Camacho-Quinn, Kendra Harrison, and Tobi Amusan.

 

The competition for the Women Athlete of the Year is intensified with the inclusion of World Championship bronze medallists Rushell Clayton and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, along with Suncorp Super Netball League standout Jhaniele Fowler.

Antonio Watson, the trailblazing Jamaican sprinter, leads the nominations for the Men Athlete of the Year. Watson made history as the first Jamaican man in 40 years to clinch the gold medal in the World Championships 400m.

The list of male nominees also features World Championships 110m hurdles silver medalist and Diamond League champion Hansle Parchment, along with standout long jumpers Wayne Pinnock, Tajay Gayle, the silver and bronze medalists from Budapest as well as Pan American 400m hurdles champion Jaheel Hyde, and motorsports star Fraser McConnell.

The People's Choice Award nominations encompass memorable moments, including Shamar Nicholson's equalizing goal in the recent CONCACAF Nations League quarter-final match against Canada and Drew Spence's incredible free kick against Canada in their Olympic qualifier.

The selection panel, chaired by Mike Fennell, boasts a distinguished lineup including retired media practitioner Courtney Sergeant, Olympian Deon Hemmings-McCatty, President of Jamaica’s Inter-Secondary School Sports Association Keith Wellington, and Michael Hall, former chairman of the Sports Foundation and League Operations Manager of the Caribbean Premier League.

 

In recognition of his exceptional contributions to Bahamian sports history, Tokyo Olympic gold medalist Steven Gardiner was on Monday bestowed with The Golden Jubilee Independence Award of Supreme Honor by the Government of The Bahamas. The accolade celebrates Gardiner's remarkable achievements on the track, solidifying his legacy as a trailblazer for the nation.

The Special Golden Jubilee of Independence Award recognizes citizens for their outstanding contributions to The Bahamas in various spheres of human endeavor encompassing both the pre-Independence and post-Independence periods of Bahamian history.

Gardiner's triumph in the 400m event at the Tokyo Olympics not only secured his status as the 2021 Olympic champion but also etched his name in Bahamian sports history as the first Bahamian man to clinch Olympic gold in any sport. The 28-year-old sprinter, also the 2019 World Champion, has had a stellar career, boasting Olympic bronze and World Championship silver medals.

Known for his blazing speed, Gardiner holds the Bahamas national records for the 400m and 200m, clocking impressive times of 43.48 and 19.75, respectively. Indoors, he has demonstrated his prowess with a national best performance of 31.56 over 300m, setting an area best and world-best performance.

Despite setbacks caused by injuries that sidelined him during the 2022 and 2023 World Championships in Oregon and Budapest, Gardiner remains hopeful for a triumphant return at the 2024 Paris Olympics.

Expressing his gratitude for the prestigious award, Gardiner acknowledged the consistent support from God, family, friends, and supporters. In an Instagram post, he shared his anticipation for the upcoming track season and the opportunities to showcase his talent, stating, "I look forward to this upcoming track season and the opportunities to showcase my talent and make my country proud."

Gardiner's achievements add to The Bahamas' proud legacy in track and field, a legacy that includes notable figures like contemporary athletes Shaunae Miller-Uibo and Tonique Williams.

 

Olympic 400m champion Steven Gardiner is back to full health and is determined to defend his title in Paris, France next year.

In one of the more heartbreaking moments of the 2023 World Athletics Championships, the Bahamian star, who won the 400m title in Doha in 2019 and on the rebound from an injury that kept him out of the championships in Oregon in 2022, suffered an injury in his semi-final heat, tragically ending his campaign in Budapest.

Running out lane six in the last of three semi-finals, Gardiner was in complete control when he suddenly collapsed and fell to the track. He later revealed he had suffered a grade-one sprain of the tendon extending into the knee of the right posterior thigh.

His injury opened the door for Jamaica’s Antonio Watson, who advanced to the final with the fastest time of 44.13, to win Jamaica’s first gold medal in the event in 40 years.

However, in an interview with Bahamian media platform Eyewitness News, the soft-spoken Gardiner expressed confidence about his coming campaign to win a second Olympic gold medal.

“I’m back 100 per cent. Between my doctors in Germany and my coach in the US, we all are on one accord to take it slowly at the beginning of the season and then we’ll be ready for Paris 2024,” he said.

Gardiner revealed that there is only one objective for the coming season.

“The gold medal is the main goal. You know, to bring the medal home to Bahamas once more and also to defend the title that I conquered in 2021, so I just want to do it all again.”

In a heartwarming celebration of athletic excellence and academic dedication, three-time Olympic gold medallist Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce was awarded the Alumni Exemplar Sports Award at the University of the West Indies' 75th-anniversary event on Friday night.

The Jamaican sprinting sensation, a five-time world 100m champion, expressed deep gratitude for the recognition from the university that she attended for just one month several years ago.

In a statement shared on her Instagram page on Sunday, Fraser-Pryce expressed her honour, saying, "I am honoured to receive the 2023 Alumni Exemplar Sports Award from the University of the West Indies at their 75th Anniversary Celebration."

She went on to emphasize the dual pillars of her career, stating, "My career has always been rooted in sports and education, and as I go into another year, I’m committed to continue my work with @sfppocketrocketfoundation to ensure students are ready to rise."

Fraser-Pryce, who had previously been honored with an honorary doctorate of laws degree from the University of the West Indies in 2016, as well as a similar honor from the University of Technology, seized the spotlight once again.

Her remarkable achievements extend beyond the track, as she graduated from the University of Technology in 2012 with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Child and Adolescent Development with honors.

The star sprinter, known for her incredible speed on the track, has also proven to be a force for positive change off the field. As the founder of the Pocket Rocket Foundation, Fraser-Pryce has dedicated herself to providing crucial financial support to deserving student-athletes. Her foundation is a testament to her commitment to the intersection of sports and education.

This recognition comes as Fraser-Pryce sets her sights on another historic milestone – a third Olympic 100m gold medal at the Paris 2024 Olympics.

Celebrating the outstanding achievements and enduring legacy of one of Jamaica's greatest athletes, Dr. The Honorable Mrs. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce OJ, a three-time Olympic gold medallist and a five-time 100m world champion, is set to receive The University of the West Indies (UWI) Alumni Exemplar Sports Award for 2023 on Friday night.

 This prestigious accolade is a testament to Fraser-Pryce's unparalleled athletic prowess, unwavering discipline, dedication, tenacity, and sportsmanship.

The award will be presented at the UWI Gala, marking the 75th Anniversary Celebration of the institution. The recognition underscores Fraser-Pryce's remarkable journey, from her days as an Honorary Graduate of the University of the West Indies, where she showcased brilliance both on and off the track.

In 2016, Fraser-Pryce received the Honorary Doctor of Laws from the University of the West Indies, Mona campus, a testament to her exceptional contributions to the world of athletics and beyond. The University of Technology also conferred upon her an Honorary Doctor of Laws, further solidifying her impact on the academic and athletic spheres. In 2012, she graduated from the University of Technology with a Bachelor's Degree in Child and Adolescent Development with honours.

 

Fraser-Pryce's illustrious career has been adorned with numerous awards and accolades, reflecting her excellence on the global stage. She clinched the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association's Golden Cleats Award for Female Athlete of the Year four times (2009, 2012, 2013, and 2015).

Additionally, she secured the RJR National Sportswoman of the Year award in 2012, 2013, 2015, 2019 and 2022.

 Her international recognition includes nominations for the Laureus World Sports Award for Sportswoman of the Year in 2010, 2013, 2014, 2016, 2019 and 2022. She finally won the prestigious award in 2023.

One of the defining moments of Fraser-Pryce's career came in 2013 when she achieved an unprecedented feat in track and field. She became the first woman in history to win the Triple World Sprint Championship, securing gold in the 100m, 200m, and 4x100m at the Championship in Moscow. This remarkable achievement earned her the title of IAAF Athlete of the Year.

Beyond her athletic prowess, Fraser-Pryce has been recognized for her contributions to society. In 2008, she was conferred with the Order of Distinction, Officer Class, by the Government of Jamaica. The same year, she received the Prime Minister’s Youth Award for excellence in Sports. In 2010, she was named the 1st UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador for Jamaica and the Grace Goodwill Ambassador for Peace. In September 2014, the Prime Minister of Jamaica bestowed upon her the title of Ambassador at Large for Jamaica.

As Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce accepts the UWI Alumni Exemplar Sports Award, the celebration not only honors her extraordinary athletic journey but also recognizes her indelible mark on the global stage as a symbol of Jamaican pride and excellence.

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