Rafael Nadal spectacularly progressed to a 15th French Open semi-final, defeating Novak Djokovic in four sets 6-2 4-6 6-2 7-6 (7-4) on Tuesday.

Nadal had lost to Djokovic on only two of their past nine meetings at Roland Garros, and the 13-time French Open winner raced out the blocks as he twice broke the world number one to claim a 4-1 first-set lead.

The Spaniard swiftly secured the first set on Court Philippe-Chatrier and opened with another break after a mammoth 17-point game, which Nadal eventually won on his seventh break point.

Djokovic faltered again on his next service to fall 3-0 down but immediately made amends by breaking Nadal consecutively to fight back for control.

Nadal had a chance to take the set to 5-5, but was broken after pushing his shot long and the Serbian ultimately triumphed in the second set in an hour and 24 minutes.

Nadal then responded by taking the third set in stunning fashion, seemingly cruising to take it 6-2.

Djokovic regained a semblance of control early in the fourth set but was crucially broken back in the ninth game as the crowd urged on Nadal, who built momentum and started hitting flatter.

It was a critical point in the match and Nadal displayed incredible capacity to turn defence into attack, while unforced errors crept into the first seed's game.

On his third attempt in the game, Nadal finally secured the break with a sumptuous off-forehand, punishing Djokovic who dropped the ball short.

Suggesting this could be his last game at Roland Garros, the 35-year-old played with profound determination and assertiveness, taking the fourth-set tie-break 7-4.

Data slam: The King of Clay reigns over Djokovic

With Tuesday's win in four sets, Nadal moved to an 8-2 record over 10 matches at Roland Garros against the world number one.

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS

Nadal – 57/43
Djokovic – 48/53

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS

Nadal – 3/4
Djokovic – 5/4

BREAK POINTS WON

Nadal – 7/17
Djokovic – 4/12

Rafael Nadal spectacularly progressed to a 15th French Open semi-final, defeating Novak Djokovic in four sets 6-2 4-6 6-2 7-6 (7-4) on Tuesday.

Nadal had lost to Djokovic on only two of their past nine meetings at Roland Garros, and the 13-time French Open winner raced out the blocks as he twice broke the world number one to claim a 4-1 first-set lead.

The Spaniard swiftly secured the first set on Court Philippe-Chatrier and opened with another break after a mammoth 17-point game, which Nadal eventually won on his seventh break point.

Djokovic faltered again on his next service to fall 3-0 down but immediately made amends by breaking Nadal consecutively to fight back for control.

Nadal had a chance to take the set to 5-5, but was broken after pushing his shot long and the Serbian ultimately triumphed in the second set in an hour and 24 minutes.

Nadal then responded by taking the third set in stunning fashion, seemingly cruising to take it 6-2.

Djokovic regained a semblance of control early in the fourth set but was crucially broken back in the ninth game as the crowd urged on Nadal, who built momentum and started hitting flatter.

It was a critical point in the match and Nadal displayed incredible capacity to turn defence into attack, while unforced errors crept into the first seed's game.

On his third attempt in the game, Nadal finally secured the break with a sumptuous off-forehand, punishing Djokovic who dropped the ball short.

Suggesting this could be his last game at Roland Garros, the 35-year-old played with profound determination and assertiveness, taking the fourth-set tie-break 7-4.

Data slam: The King of Clay reigns over Djokovic

With Tuesday's win in four sets, Nadal moved to an 8-2 record over 10 matches at Roland Garros against the world number one.

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS

Nadal – 57/43
Djokovic – 48/53

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS

Nadal – 3/4
Djokovic – 5/4

BREAK POINTS WON

Nadal – 7/17
Djokovic – 4/12

Carlos Alcaraz was philosophical after his French Open elimination at the hands of Alexander Zverev, adamant he has no need to blow it out of proportion.

Despite being seeded three places below Zverev, the 19-year-old Spaniard went into their quarter-final as many people's favourite.

But after a slow start that Zverev punished, Alcaraz's second grand slam quarter-final proved a learning curve.

Zverev ultimately won 6-4 6-4 4-6 7-6 (9-7) to clinch his maiden top-10 scalp at a grand slam, though the German acknowledged he managed to end the contest just as Alcaraz was starting to take charge.

As such, the sixth seed felt there were plenty of reasons to feel positive about his tournament.

"I would say I finished the match playing better," he said. "I leave the court, leave the tournament with the head very high. I fight until the last ball. I fought until the last second of the match, and I'm proud of it.

"I have to take the lesson today. It was a tough match and close match I think. I could say I didn't start well, and in this level, quarter-final of a grand slam, you are playing against the best players in the world, so you have to start the match better than I did today.

"I have to improve to the next grand slam or next matches. But I would say I'm not far away to reach a semi-final or be able to win a grand slam.

"I would say I have the level, I have the confidence to win a grand slam or pass through to the semi-final next time.

"I mean, this match is not going to be tough for me or I'm going to say I'm disappointed for this match. I'm just going to try to take the positive things of the match, and of course the bad things that I did, to improve to the next matches or next tournaments or next grand slams.

"I could say I was close to a good match, close to a fifth set, and in the fifth set everything could happen.

"This was my second quarter-final in a grand slam, and I think I fight until the last ball and hope to the next grand slam, next quarter-final that I play in a grand slam, [hope to] do it better and to my chances to pass to the semi-finals."

Alexander Zverev said he was "s******* my pants" as he attempted to stave off a fightback from Carlos Alcaraz in his French Open quarter-final win on Tuesday.

Zverev claimed an impressive 6-4 6-4 4-6 7-6 (9-7) win over the 19-year-old Spaniard to set up a semi-final with either Novak Djokovic or Rafael Nadal.

The German initially appeared dominant as his controlled and composed display saw him take a two-set lead, and although Alcaraz did improve in the third, Zverev even had the opportunity to serve out the match for a straight-sets win.

He failed to grasp that chance and Alcaraz looked likely to level the match as he began to exert greater control in rallies – his dropshots proving especially threatening.

But Zverev clung on even as the crowd vociferously backed his opponent in the fourth-set tie-break, eventually seizing his opportunity when he felt Alcaraz was potentially taking charge of the match.

Asked about his emotions in a fourth set that was something of a rollercoaster, he said: "[I was] s******* my pants as well."

The rather crude joke received a flat response from a Court Philippe-Chatrier crowd that never particularly got behind Zverev.

However, he soon waxed lyrical about his popular opponent, who was the first top-10 scalp of Zverev's career at a grand slam.

"At the end of the day, I knew I had to play my absolute best tennis from the start, and I'm happy I did that," Zverev continued.

"He kept on coming back, he's an incredible player. I told him at the net that he's going to win this tournament a lot of times, not only once.

"So I hope I can win it before he starts beating us all and we'll have no chance at all."

Zverev suggested his dip after the second set was contributed to by the changing conditions, having thrived in the sun and then seen his level drop when in the shade.

But he could not hide his joy at avoiding a fifth set.

"For me, when it's shady and slower it's not perfect for me," he said. "I didn't get broken once when it was sunny, the ball was a lot faster, I had to adjust my strings as well.

"The match was turning his way, so at the end of the day I'm extremely happy I won the tie-break and I didn't have to play a five-set match, didn't have to be disappointed after the five-set match again like I was last year.

"I'm still in the tournament – usually I'm a very good talker, but right now I can't talk. I'm speechless."

Alexander Zverev beat a top-10 player at a grand slam for the first time in his career as he defeated one of the pre-French Open favourites Carlos Alcaraz to reach the semi-finals.

Despite being seeded higher, Zverev seemingly came into the match as the underdog but ultimately produced a cool performance to win 6-4 6-4 4-6 7-6 (9-7) and awaits either Novak Djokovic or Rafael Nadal.

Alcaraz's sloppiness helped contribute to a fairly dominant first couple of sets for Zverev, but the gifted Spaniard fought back impressively to take the third and the tide appeared to be turning in the teenager's favour.

Zverev was no longer controlling rallies and increasingly found Alcaraz's blend of power and finesse tricky to cope with, but showed admirable grit to cling on and silence his opponent's vocal support.

The 25-year-old improved after a nervy start, capitalising on poor serving to claim the first break, with the near-flawless Zverev dropping just two more points on serve as he closed the first set in composed fashion.

The erratic Alcaraz was showing only flashes of his ability, while Zverev appeared unflappable as he saved a break point at 2-1 down in the second set before snatching a break of his own – the Spaniard regretting an attempt to serve and volley as he quickly found himself two sets down.

Going on the offensive was a necessity for Alcaraz in the third set and his spirit kept him alive when saving another break point with an immaculate drop shot – one of many – and an ace at 4-4.

He then finally broke Zverev for the first time, another brilliant drop shot doing the business, and he soon had the set.

By this point, Alcaraz appeared to be exerting greater control in the rallies playing up to the crowd more, but Zverev ended their fourth-set deadlock with a break that allowed him to serve for the match – not that he could capitalise.

Alcaraz hit back instantly and emphatically with a tie-break beckoning. His energy seemed to suggest the match was heading only one way, but Zverev held off a set point and finally put the match to bed with a reflex shot at the net.  

Jessica Pegula promised to come out fighting with her "A-game" as she aims for a "great story" by defeating the in-form Iga Swiatek at the French Open.

World number one Swiatek survived a first-set scare against Zheng Qinwen in the fourth round at Roland Garros to secure a 6-7 (5-7) 6-0 6-2 win on Monday.

That extended Swiatek's winning run to 32 matches, which means only Serena Williams (34) and Venus Williams (35) have recorded longer streaks on the WTA Tour this century.

Swiatek would match the longest winning run of the 2000s – set by Venus Williams in 2000 (35) – should she go on to lift the Coupe Suzanne Lenglen for a second time on Saturday, but first has to find a way past Pegula on Wednesday.

Pegula has only dropped two sets in Paris after reaching the quarter-finals with a 4-6 6-2 6-3 triumph over Romania’s Irina-Camelia Begu.

The world number 11 was the 16th scalp of Swiatek's incredible winning run when she lost to the Pole in Miami, and the American knows she must be at her best to contend with the top seed - who turned 21 on Tuesday.

"I know I'm going to have to play really, really well," Pegula said.

"I'm going to have to play aggressive against her, I'm going to have to go for my shots, because she is better when the point extends.

"I'm going to try and shorten the points as much as I can but at the same time try and be patient and not go for too much and miss my shots.

"But it's definitely going to be really tough. Hopefully I can bring my A-game because I need it."

Pegula and Swiatek share a 1-1 head-to-head record and is determined to be the one to end her dominance. 

"I practised with her here as well before the tournament started and she's a super nice girl," Pegula revealed.

"We practised a few times. So I definitely know [her game] but obviously in the moment, it's hard to pinpoint exactly what you should do. 

"She's just been so solid in every aspect. I think it's one of those things where at least I've played her so I think I do have that familiar sense, going against her, but yeah maybe a little different on clay.

"I think it goes both ways. I think sometimes it's like, 'Oh, I wish I didn't play her in the quarter-finals. I wish I played one of the other people, and didn't meet her so early, but then at the same time, it's a great chance to have a great win and a great story."

Coco Gauff marched into her first grand slam semi-final with a straight-sets defeat of fellow American Sloane Stephens at the French Open.

Teenager Gauff will face the unseeded Martina Trevisan for a place in the final after beating her compatriot 7-5 6-2 at Roland Garros on Tuesday.

The composed 18-year-old has not dropped a set in Paris and produced another assured display on Court Phillipe-Chatrier to break new ground.

Eighth seed Gauff was rewarded for an aggressive display, breaking six times as Stephens paid the price for being too passive in a contest that was over in 90 minutes.

Gauff started with huge confidence, racing into a 3-0 lead courtesy of some heavy hitting while creating great angles.

Stephens clicked into gear with a more aggressive approach, winning three games in a row from 5-2 down as Gauff was unable to serve out the set.

The teenager halted with momentum with a hold and wrapped up the set with a backhand winner after the 2017 US Open champion made a mess of a volley at the net.

Stephens came out firing to break in the first game of the second set, but Gauff hit straight back to get back on serve and led 3-1 after ending another point she dictated with a cross-court backhand winner.

The 64th-ranked Stephens was gifted a chance to get back on serve when Gauff presented her with a simple volley at the net, but she inexplicably drilled it long and the youngster held for a 4-1 lead after saving three break points.

Gauff had won five games in a row and was on the brink of victory when her opponent crashed a forehand into the net, and although she failed to serve out the match in a nervy game, she broke for a fourth time in the second set to seal it.

 

Data slam: Gauff living the teenage dream

Gauff became only the fifth female player to reach the last four at Roland Garros this century before turning 19. On the evidence of this display, she has a great chance of playing in a maiden major final on Saturday.

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS
Gauff– 18/23
Stephens – 16/31

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS
Gauff – 3/6
Stephens– 0/1

BREAK POINTS WON
Gauff – 6/10
Stephens – 3/9

Leylah Fernandez's French Open run came to a halt as the teenager fell short against Martina Trevisan.

Fernandez was the favourite heading into her second grand slam quarter-final, but despite showing strong resolve, last year's US Open runner-up ultimately could not match Trevisan, who prevailed 6-2 6-7 (3-7) 6-3.

Trevisan, who reached the Roland Garros quarters in 2020 and won her first singles title in Rabat prior to the French Open, set the tone by breaking Fernandez in the first game, and the 19-year-old's task was made more difficult when she required medical treatment for a right foot problem.

The first set went Trevisan's way in 35 minutes, but Fernandez rallied with the first break of set two.

Trevisan broke straight back before holding from 0-40 down, and Fernandez's resolve was tested further in the next game, yet a misdirected forehand down the line saw the Canadian hold.

Fernandez sent a forehand wide to hand the world number 59 the chance to serve out the win, but Trevisan could not capitalise at match point as her opponent went from the brink of defeat to levelling the tie.

But if the momentum seemed with Fernandez after the tie-break, then Trevisan firmly regained control by reeling off seven straight points to start the decider.

Fernandez saved the first two break points, yet Trevisan clinched the third, and after an almighty tussle in game four, the Italian claimed a key double break.

Although world number 18 Fernandez claimed one of those back, Trevisan had the bit between her teeth and, for the second time, had the chance to serve out the match.

Again, the opportunity slipped from her grasp, and a swift hold from Fernandez piled the pressure on.

This time, Trevisan held her nerve – a wonderful serve setting up a second match point, which she took with a fantastic cross-court forehand.

Data Slam: Lesser-spotted all left-hander clash as Trevisan joins exclusive club

Tuesday's match was the first French Open women's quarter-final featuring two left-handed players since 1981, when Martina Navratilova went up against Sylvia Hanika.

Trevisan is the eighth Italian female player to reach the semi-finals in a grand slam after Maud Levi, Annalisa Bossi, Silvana Lazzarino, Francesca Schiavone, Sara Errani, Roberta Vinci and Flavia Pennetta.

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS
Trevisan – 43/29
Fernandez – 29/44

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS
Trevisan – 1/7
Fernandez – 0/4

BREAK POINTS WON
Trevisan – 7/14
Fernandez – 4/10

Iga Swiatek has revealed her low-key 21st birthday plans, saying she simply wants to watch two tennis greats in action at the French Open.

Swiatek progressed to the quarter-finals at Roland Garros by defeating Zheng Qinwen on Monday.

The Pole, who won her maiden grand slam title in Paris two years ago, dropped a set for the first time in more than a month as Zheng took the opener, but she came back to win 6-7 (5-7) 6-0 6-2.

Swiatek has now won 32 matches in a row, with only Venus Williams (35) and Serena Williams (34) now having enjoyed longer streaks this century.

The world number one is also the fifth female player to win 15+ consecutive matches as the number one in the 2000s after Martina Hingis, Serena Williams, Justine Henin and Dinara Safina.

Monday's win provided an early birthday gift for Swiatek, who turned 21 on Tuesday.

And while her main focus will be on a last-eight showdown with Jessica Pegula, she wants to celebrate by watching Novak Djokovic take on 13-time Roland Garros champion Rafael Nadal.

"It is always pretty hard to celebrate when you are in the middle of the tournament, but I hope I'm going to have time on my day off to do something," Swiatek wrote in her column on BBC Sport.

"I never plan things for my own birthday – it's not like I'm going to throw a party in the locker room! I just hope I will get a proper rest. But I heard my team have prepared something fun for me – so we will see.

"As everyone knows I am a Rafael Nadal fan and I would love to watch his match against Novak Djokovic.

"I will be too curious about what will happen not to see it, but I will watch on TV rather than at the stadium. I watched Rafa's last match against Felix Auger-Aliassime, although not the full game because it was so long.

"During the tournament I need to be focused on my own preparations, my rest and my routine. That's why I won't be going to watch the quarter-final in the stadium.

"But, like always, I'll be rooting for Rafa."

Swiatek added that the inspiration she takes from 21-time grand slam champion Nadal only grew after she visited the 35-year-old's academy in his native Mallorca.

"Recently I went to Rafa's academy in Mallorca and saw all his trophies in the museum he has there," she added. "I got more excited about those trophies than the ones I saw when I went to Real Madrid's stadium, although they were impressive too.

"I was really in awe at seeing the grand slam trophies Rafa has won. But I was also amazed at all the others, like the trophies he has won at Barcelona, Monte Carlo and Rome. There are so many!

"It was amazing to see the consistency he has had during his career and seeing all his trophies was really inspiring."

Iga Swiatek revealed she sang a Dua Lipa song to take her mind off a difficult first set in her French Open victory against Zheng Qinwen.

World number one Swiatek extended her astonishing winning run to 32 matches by beating Zheng in the fourth round at Roland Garros, with only Venus Williams (35) and Serena Williams (34) now having enjoyed longer streaks this century – although the Pole remains a long way short of Martina Navratilova's outrageous all-time record of 74.

But Swiatek was made to work for this victory, dropping a set for the first time in more than a month as Zheng took the opener 7-6 (7-5).

Swiatek ultimately considered this a positive, though, responding with her 16th 6-0 set of the year in the second en route to winning 6-7 (5-7) 6-0 6-2.

"For sure, for me, I'm taking a lot of confidence in my comeback in the second set," she said afterwards. "So I think it's important that I had this kind of match, which is kind of like a cold shower.

"It reminded me how to find these solutions after losing a first set. Yeah, I feel when I'm going to take some positives from it. I think it's going to give me a lot before the next matches."

Yet what were Swiatek's solutions?

"It wasn't easy to find solutions and to find other tactics and to do something differently, because I wasn't sure what I was doing wrong," she explained.

"In the first set, I get many technical [things] that I wanted to change, like staying lower in my legs and sometimes not pushing the ball but swinging it like I was doing, like I would do normally.

"She was playing really fast balls, and it wasn't easy to loosen up, because I felt a little bit tense.

"So, in the second set, I just wanted to focus more and not really talk to the box maybe that much.

"And honestly, I speeded up a little bit my forehand. Maybe that was the solution. But I felt like my mind is a little bit more clear.

"I was sometimes just singing songs, and I realised in the first set, when I was really focusing on that technical stuff, it didn't really work, because I got more and more tense when I couldn't do that and couldn't really prepare to the shot the best way.

"I was singing in my mind, basically. That's not the first time. I'm always singing something, but I changed the song. It was Dua Lipa, so kind of a guilty pleasure."

Andy Murray has revealed he almost teamed up with Emma Raducanu at Wimbledon last year and "would love to" play doubles with the US Open champion at the All England Club in the future.

Murray and Raducanu are the only two British grand slam champions of the past 45 years.

Former world number one Murray has three major titles, including two at Wimbledon, while teenager Raducanu claimed her breakthrough success at Flushing Meadows in 2021.

A Wimbledon mixed doubles team would therefore prove hugely popular, and Murray says it was actually a possibility last year before Raducanu enjoyed a breakout campaign in her home slam.

Just a month into her WTA Tour career, the Canadian-born star reached the fourth round at Wimbledon.

"Actually, last year we were maybe going to do it, but we both ended up doing well in singles," Murray explained, as quoted by The Telegraph.

"I would love to play alongside Emma at some stage. Whether that is something that works this year or not, I don't know.

"I am sure both of our focuses will be on having good runs in the singles, but I would love to do that."

Murray won a silver medal alongside Laura Robson in the mixed doubles at the London 2012 Olympics at the peak of his powers, while he teamed up with Serena Williams for a run to the Wimbledon third round while recovering from a career-threatening hip injury in 2019.

Daniil Medvedev crashed out of the French Open in straight sets to Marin Cilic, who hailed the victory as one of the best of his career after producing a scintillating display on Court Philippe-Chatrier.

Second seed Medvedev was blown away 6-2 6-3 6-2 in just one hour and 45 minutes, with the 33-year-old Cilic not looking back after forcing successive breaks to wrap up the first set.

Having broken Medvedev's serve six games into the opener, the 2014 US Open champion did likewise en route to clinching the second set, with Cilic winning 90 per cent of first-serve points over the course of a dominant display.

If Medvedev still harboured hopes of a comeback at that point, they were swiftly dashed in the third set as Cilic maintained his relentless pace, breaking the world number two in each of his first two service games as he went on to record his first career win over the Russian.

Medvedev failed to force a single break point during a miserable outing under the floodlights, with the near-flawless Cilic not registering a single double fault as he reached his first grand slam quarter-final since the 2018 US Open.

Speaking on court after teeing up a last-eight meeting with Andrey Rublev, Cilic said the win was one of the best of his career.

"It was an absolutely fantastic match, from the first point until the last. I enjoyed the atmosphere, I enjoy the night sessions here," he said.

"I played incredible tennis, one of the best matches of my career, from start to finish, and I just enjoyed being here.

"We only have one opportunity to play this sport so I try to always give my best, even when things don't go my way.

"When you're working hard and when you're really persistent, really consistent with your training, good things come. It's a great feeling to be playing again like this."

Casper Ruud described his French Open win over Hubert Hurkacz as the "perfect" way to tee up his first grand slam quarter-final appearance, as the eighth seed looks to extend the best major run of his career. 

Ruud downed Hurkacz 6-2 6-3 3-6 6-3 in 2 hours and 31 minutes on Monday to make the last-eight of the singles draw at a grand slam for the first time in his career, bettering his run to the fourth round at the Australian Open last year.

The Norwegian will face talented teenager Holger Rune for a spot in the semi-finals after the 19-year-old became the first Danish man to reach a grand slam quarter-final in the Open era by eliminating Stefanos Tsitsipas.

Speaking at his post-match news conference, Ruud said the win featured some of his best tennis this year.

"I feel good, of course. It's a good result. To make my first quarter-final here in Roland Garros means a lot. It's the first grand slam that I visited as a kid," he said.

"It's nice to get one of my best results of my career so far here. I hope I can continue the level of my tennis and [keep] the streak going.

"Today I think I played some of my best tennis this year for the first two sets. [In the] fourth set as well, I played well when I had to come back.

"I think that's a perfect way to go into a quarter-final for me. Hopefully I can reach a step or two or three more."

After recording his career-best major performance, Ruud – who lost his first ATP 1000 final to Carlos Alcaraz at the Miami Open in April – was keen to go further, saying he will only allow himself to look back upon the milestone at the end of his campaign.

"Well, I mean, of course, it's a new milestone. [But] when I'm playing the tournament, playing the match, I don't really think too much about it," he added.

"Of course, when I'm done with this or when this tournament is over for me, I will look back and think that I did a good job and did a good result and made my best result in a grand slam.

"It is going to change, of course, the way I think I look at the grand slams in the future, when you know you have reached a quarter-final one time. It has been a big goal for me this year, and to reach it is a good feeling.

"But of course, when you reach a goal, you make new goals. That's usually how it goes. My new goal will be in a few days' time to try to reach the semi-final."

With many of the game's biggest names, including Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Carlos Alcaraz all landing on the opposite side of the draw to Ruud, the 23-year-old may not get too many better chances to enjoy a deep grand slam run.

And the Norwegian suggested pundits may have placed too much focus on a few big names in the build-up to Roland Garros, adding: "Before the tournament, there was, of course, already a lot of talk who the favourite was.

"I think everyone was talking about the top half of the draw with Nadal, Djokovic and Alcaraz of course there, [but] there are many other good players in the tournament." 

Iga Swiatek had to come from behind to see off Zheng Qinwen in the French Open fourth round, eventually winning 6-7 (5-7) 6-0 6-2.

The number one seed was given a scare in the first set, losing on a tie-break, but powered back to seal a win that was partly helped by an apparent thigh injury sustained by the Chinese teenager.

The first set looked to be going with form as Swiatek raced out to a 5-2 lead, only for Zheng to come back to 5-5 before forcing a tie-break.

Again, Swiatek took a 5-2 lead, but Zheng stormed back with five straight points to claim the first set.

The first set was just three minutes shorter than Swiatek's entire third-round victory over Danka Kovinic, taking 87 minutes to be completed.

Predictably, having lost a set for the first time at Roland Garros this year, Swiatek upped the tempo at the start of the second, again getting an early break before Zheng had treatment on the top of her right leg after going 3-0 down.

With the Pole motoring and Zheng with strapping on her leg, the game swung hugely in the former's favour as she breezed through the second set 6-0.

Zheng removed the strapping at the start of the third set but it made little immediate difference as Swiatek broke immediately.

However, Zheng soon rediscovered some of the fight she showed in the first set as she was able to halt an eight-game streak from her dominant opponent to hold serve in the third game of the decider, before troubling the 20-year-old on her own serve and then holding again.

The relentless Swiatek kept applying the pressure and eventually forced the second break, before serving out the match.

She will play number 11 seed Jessica Pegula in the quarter-finals after the American also came from a set down to beat Irina-Camelia Begu on Monday.

Data Slam: Unstoppable Swiatek

Swiatek's growing winning streak is now at 32, which means only Serena Williams (34) and Venus Williams (35) having recorded longer streaks on the WTA Tour this century.

WINNERS/UNFORCED ERRORS
Swiatek – 32/39
Zheng – 21/46

ACES/DOUBLE FAULTS
Swiatek – 2/1
Zheng – 4/5

BREAK POINTS WON
Swiatek – 7/14
Zheng – 2/10

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