Emma Raducanu has no regrets over her decision to withdraw from the mixed doubles tournament at Wimbledon, a call that ended Andy Murray's career at SW19.

The 2021 US Open champion was due to play alongside Murray on Saturday, in what would have been the Scot's final entry at a tournament where he has won two singles titles, ahead of his expected retirement later this year.

Murray was unable to play singles after undergoing back surgery but did appear alongside brother Jamie in the men's doubles on Thursday, losing in straight sets to John Peers and Rinky Hijikata.

Raducanu cited soreness in her wrist as she withdrew from the mixed doubles to prioritise her singles campaign, which ended with Sunday's last-16 defeat to Lulu Sun.

She is certain she made the right choice, saying after her elimination: "It was a very difficult decision. Of course, I didn't want to take his last match away from him. 

"But I think a lot of players in a similar situation would have done the same thing, prioritising their body. I still stand by making the right call.

"I don't think I would have done it any other way. I think in this sport especially, as an individual, you have to make your own calls and prioritise yourself."

Raducanu's withdrawal caused controversy on social media as Murray's mother Judy described the news as "astonishing" on X, later insisting the post was sarcastic and suggesting the tournament's scheduling had forced Raducanu's hand.

Asked about that initial post, Raducanu claimed she had not seen it before adding: "I'm sure she didn't mean it."

Andy Murray's Wimbledon career came to an early end after Emma Raducanu pulled out of their planned appearance in the mixed doubles.

The pair were due to team up on Saturday in what would have been Murray's final event appearance at Wimbledon ahead of his retirement.

However, Raducanu has withdrawn from the event due to stiffness in her right wrist.

The 21-year-old booked her place in the women’s singles fourth round on Friday with another commanding win, beating Maria Sakkart in straight sets.

"I have decided to make the very tough decision to withdraw from the mixed doubles," Raducanu said.

"I’m disappointed as I was really looking forward to playing with Andy, but I've got to take care."

Murray, a two-time singles champion at Wimbledon, had already pulled out of the men's event after having minor surgery on his back in the build-up to the tournament.

It means the 37-year-old played his last game at All England Club on Thursday when he and older brother Jamie were knocked out of the men's doubles in the first round.

Murray is set to finish his career at the Paris Olympics later this month, competing in both the singles and the doubles, alongside Dan Evans.

Andy Murray said he wished he could play on forever after his final Wimbledon began with a doubles defeat alongside brother Jamie on an emotional Centre Court.  

Murray and brother Jamie suffered a 7-6 (8-6) 6-4 defeat to Australian pair John Peers and Rinky Hijikata, two days after he announced he would not participate in the singles.

The two-time Wimbledon champion, who underwent back surgery just over a week ago, has since announced he will pair up with Emma Raducanu in the mixed doubles. 

Following his doubles match on Thursday, the likes of John McEnroe and Novak Djokovic were invited onto Centre Court for an emotional ceremony to mark his achievements at the tournament, which he won in 2013 and 2016.

In an interview with BBC Sport's Sue Barker, Murray said of teaming up with his elder brother: "It was obviously really special, I never had the chance to do it before. 

"The way things worked out, there was a chance this year and it was a race against time.

"Physically it wasn't easy but I'm glad we could get out here and do it just one time together."

Murray has repeatedly said he will retire at the end of 2024, with an appearance at the Paris Olympics now his target.

Speaking about his impending retirement, Murray said: "It's hard. I would love to keep playing but I physically can't, it's too tough now. 

"The injuries have added up and they haven't been insignificant. I want to play forever. I love the sport, it's given me so much and taught me so many lessons."

Reflecting on his two victories at SW19, Murray said the pressure of winning his first grand slam title meant he could not fully enjoy the 2013 success, but opened up on the big celebrations that followed his second triumph.

"I didn't really enjoy it as much as I should have done, I just found it very, very stressful," Murray said. "2016 was different. 

"I felt way less pressure and the enjoyment I got out of that win was amazing, I could enjoy it with the people closest to me. 

"Of the slams, that was my favourite one. I don't remember much of that night, I had a few drinks and I did unfortunately vomit in the cab on the way home!"

Emma Raducanu simply could not refuse a "once-in-a-lifetime" opportunity to partner her "hero" Andy Murray in the Wimbledon mixed doubles.

Murray pulled out of the men's singles draw on Tuesday after having minor surgery on a troublesome back issue, but confirmed he would partner brother Jamie for the doubles on the male side of the draw.

The two-time Wimbledon singles champion will be in action in another competition, too, after the tournament granted Raducanu and Murray a wild-card entry to the mixed doubles draw.

Speaking after sweeping aside Elise Mertens 6-2 6-2 in the women's singles second round on Wednesday, Raducanu revelled in her chance to play with Murray.

"My doubles record isn't exactly the longest, or the most vast, but I couldn't say no," Raducanu said after her victory over Mertens. "It's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

"It's been a dream of mine since I was a young girl, since watching the Olympics. Andy's a hero to all of us.

"So for me, it's a real gift and it's a real honour that he asked me and it's a moment that I could never say no to.

"And I'm just super excited to be on the mixed doubles court and hopefully learn a thing or two about coming to the net or something!"

Murray suggested there has always been a desire to partner Raducanu, with two of the biggest names in British tennis now joining forces.

"We'd spoken about it during the COVID year but obviously both of us were doing quite well in the singles and it didn't happen," Murray said after his practice session at the All England Club.

"Last night I messaged her coach and asked if he thought it might be something she'd be up for doing.

"He said it was worth asking, so I did. It was quite late yesterday evening when I sent the message, it would have been after 9 p.m. so I was a bit worried she might have been in bed.

"But I got a quick reply. She said: 'Yeah, let's do it.' That was it."

A tough test awaits for the newly formed pair, however, after being drawn to face Marcelo Arevalo and Zhang Shuai in the first round.

Arevalo secured French Open men's doubles glory for the second time last month, while Zhang is a two-time major champion in the same format.

Andy Murray and Emma Raducanu will play the mixed doubles event at Wimbledon as a wildcard entry.

Murray has been struggling with a back injury in recent weeks, for which he needed minor surgery, and pulled out of the men's singles on Tuesday.

However, he confirmed he would still be competing in the men's doubles alongside older brother Jamie.

The two-time singles champion is playing at Wimbledon for the final time before retiring later this year.

It will be Murray's fourth appearance in the mixed doubles, most notably pairing up with Serena Williams in 2019, making it to the third round.

2021 US Open champion Raducanu has already advanced to the second round in the women's singles and will play in the mixed doubles for the first time at a grand slam.

The pair are playing together for the first time, with the first round of the event scheduled for Friday and Saturday. They will find out their first opponents on Wednesday.

Andy Murray acknowledged "it was the right decision" to withdraw from the Wimbledon men's singles, despite the "extreme" disappointment of missing out.

The two-time champion pulled out of the men's singles event at SW19 early on Tuesday, after failing to recover from spinal cyst surgery in time to face Tomas Machac in the opening round later that day.

Murray's team confirmed his withdrawal after the former world number one gave himself every opportunity to be in a position to walk out and compete on Centre Court. 

While it was not meant to be for the 37-year-old, he took pride in the strides he made just 10 days after going under the knife.

"I decided this morning. I slept on it," he said. "I told my team and my family that I didn't think I was going to play, just based on how I felt yesterday.

"I practised pretty well, and I was playing pretty good, I just wasn't happy with how my leg was feeling, and I wanted to sleep on it and make sure I was happy with the decision.

"I ran around at home a bit this morning when I got up, and it just wasn't where I wanted it to be, unfortunately. It's probably a few days too soon, but I worked extremely hard to at least give myself a chance to play.

"It was the right decision. It is extremely disappointing that I wasn't able to play but, at the same time, where I'm at -10 days after the operation in comparison to where I was told I would be and what my expectations were - is incredible really.

"I wanted to have a chance to go out there and walk out on my own on the Centre Court again and give it another go. But I also was only going to do that if I felt like I could be competitive, and I didn't feel like that today.

"I'm sorry for everyone that came and wanted to support and watch again. I wanted that moment as well, as much for me as the people who have supported me over the years.

"The fans but also my closest friends, family, my team. It was important for me to do that with them as well. It's one of those things. The timing was horrible, the surgery was a complex one, and it wasn't to be."

All is not lost for Murray, though, as he will compete alongside brother Jamie in the men's doubles.

The pair, who practised together on Tuesday, and are set to face the Australian duo of Rinky Hijikata and John Peers later in the week, and the three-time major winner is relishing the occasion.

"Getting the opportunity to play with Jamie here will be special," he added. "We've never done that before, and I'll make sure I make the most of it.

"It's easier said than done to just enjoy it when you're out there because you're competing and concentrating on trying to win the match. But hopefully, we can have a good run.

"We've got a good chance of winning. Jamie and I play great doubles together. We can definitely win the match."

Novak Djokovic hopes Andy Murray can make one final appearance in the Wimbledon men's singles, as the seven-time champion paid tribute to a "legend of the game" and "huge inspiration to all the players".

Two-time winner Murray withdrew from the men's singles event early on Tuesday, after failing to recover from spinal cyst surgery in time to face Tomas Machac in the opening round later that day.

The former world number one will instead partner brother Jamie in the doubles of what is set to be his SW19 swansong.

Djokovic saluted the Briton following his straight-sets victory over Vit Kopriva in the opening round, but believes the story may not be over quite yet.

"Hopefully, he can get another shot at next year's Wimbledon with singles," the 24-time major winner said of Murray. "Knowing him, he's going to try to do that.

"[He's shown] incredible resilience throughout his career. [A] multiple Grand Slam winner. Legend of the game. Number one in the world. Just a huge inspiration to all the players. He doesn't mind getting on court for hours every day. Incredible professional.

"His approach is something to study. His will to push and see how far he can go, even with an artificial hip, is something that's inspiring, but also serves as a great example to a lot of younger athletes that complain about this and that.

"He has left a great mark on and off the court for tennis. But something tells me that he'll keep going. He has every right to say when it's the finish line for him. If he wants to keep going, no doubt people will be very happy about it."

Murray had been due to appear on Centre Court, but the vacated slot was filled by current British number one Jack Draper who, somewhat fittingly, came through an epic five-set battle with Sweden's Elias Ymer.

The 22-year-old is full of momentum having recently claimed his maiden ATP title at the Stuttgart Open. He also paid tribute to the three-time major winner.

"You probably wanted to see Andy out here, but you were stuck with me instead!" Draper joked during his on-court interview.

"I wouldn't be here without Andy. He's an incredible guy off the court, so funny, so genuine. One of a kind. What a competitor, and what a champion."

Andy Murray should be considered at the same level of Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer as he approaches the end of his career, says Mark Philippoussis.

On Tuesday, Murray confirmed he had withdrawn from what was expected to be his final singles outing at Wimbledon after failing to fully recover from back surgery.

He will play doubles alongside brother Jamie but will now be denied a singles send-off at the tournament he won in 2013 and 2016, making him the only British man to lift the trophy in the Open Era.

While Murray's three grand slam titles put him some way adrift of Djokovic (24), Nadal (22) and Federer (20), 2003 Wimbledon runner-up Philippoussis feels being a multiple major champion in their era makes Murray one of the greats.

"Andy Murray is a great person first of all, I have known him since we were a very young age, I know the family too," Philippoussis told Stats Perform.

"He has an amazing career and people say the top three; they say, Djokovic, Nadal and Federer but I always have him in the top four because I think he was the one who pushed those guys to the limits.

"He's had an amazing career. I wish him luck in his life, in his family life, and his next chapter in the future.

Philippoussis hopes when Murray hangs up his racket, he will stay in the game in some capacity, adding: "What he's brought to the table has been incredible. 

"At the time when you had literally three guys dominating, Federer, Nadal and Djokovic. For him to be a multiple grand slam champion, number one in the world and a gold medallist and Davis Cup champion, he's done it all. 

"He might not have the grand slam numbers like the other guys, but he'll definitely go down as one of the greatest. 

"To have done all that when they were dominating the sport is incredibly impressive. It will be sad to see him not at Wimbledon and I hope we'll get a chance to see him one more time.

"I'm proud and it's inspiring to see him still around because he loves the game. Hopefully, he can stay around because he loves the game."

The last few years have seen Murray hampered by injuries, with the Scot undergoing two hip surgeries in 2018 and 2019.

Alexander Bublik, who has won two of five head-to-head meetings with Murray, says watching him frustrated in his bid to recapture past glories has been sad.

"I honestly don't know what to say because he's been struggling and it's painful to see but he enjoys the struggle. The guy is killing himself and he's in pain," he said. 

"It's tough to see because he's been number one in the world, he won three slams, so it's tough for any young player who saw him win big titles, to see him like this."

Andy Murray has withdrawn from the men's singles event at Wimbledon.

It means the two-time champion and former world number one will be unable to take part in what was set to be a farewell singles appearance at the All England Club.

However, he will still take to the courts, but instead in the doubles, as he plans to play alongside his brother Jamie.

Murray has been struggling with a back problem and has failed to recover from minor surgery in time to feature in the singles draw.

The 37-year-old had been set to face Tomas Machac on Centre Court on Tuesday.

However, his team confirmed in a statement that Murray, who is planning to retire this year, would not play.

"Unfortunately, despite working incredibly hard on his recovery since his operation just over a week ago, Andy has taken the very difficult decision not to play the singles this year," a statement read.

"As you can imagine, he is extremely disappointed but has confirmed that he will be playing in the doubles with Jamie and looks forward to competing at Wimbledon for the last time."

Winning the tournament in 2013 and 2016, Murray (2012-13, 2016) is the only British player to reach the final at Wimbledon in the Open Era.

The Scot has played 74 matches at Wimbledon; it is the fifth-most matches played in the men's singles draw at this tournament during the Open Era.

His 61 wins, meanwhile, are the sixth-most of any man after Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic, Jimmy Connors, Becker and Pete Sampras.

Andy Murray has withdrawn from the men's singles event at Wimbledon.

It means the two-time champion and former world number one will be unable to take part in what was set to be a farewell singles appearance at the All England Club.

However, he will still take to the courts, but instead in the doubles, as he plans to play alongside his brother Jamie.

Murray has been struggling with a back problem and has failed to recover from minor surgery in time to feature in the singles draw.

The 37-year-old had been set to face Tomas Machac on Centre Court on Tuesday.

However, his team confirmed in a statement that Murray, who is planning to retire this year, would not play.

"Unfortunately, despite working incredibly hard on his recovery since his operation just over a week ago, Andy has taken the very difficult decision not to play the singles this year," a statement read.

"As you can imagine, he is extremely disappointed but has confirmed that he will be playing in the doubles with Jamie and looks forward to competing at Wimbledon for the last time."

Winning the tournament in 2013 and 2016, Murray (2012-13, 2016) is the only British player to reach the final at Wimbledon in the Open Era.

The Scot has played 74 matches at Wimbledon; it is the fifth-most matches played in the men's singles draw at this tournament during the Open Era.

His 61 wins, meanwhile, are the sixth-most of any man after Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic, Jimmy Connors, Becker and Pete Sampras.

Andy Murray says he wants "a bit of closure" at Wimbledon as he continues a fight to be fit in time for his opening match.

The Brit is due to retire later this year but has previously said either Wimbledon or the Olympics would be a fitting stage to end his career.

However, Murray was forced to retire injured during the Queen's Club Championships in the second round due to a back injury earlier this month, for which he later underwent surgery.

Murray's Wimbledon campaign is due to start on Tuesday against Tomas Machac, but he is still yet to decide whether he will actually be competing in the men's singles event at the All England Club.

"I don't think there's one thing that I'm hoping for. When it comes to the end, I don't know, maybe a bit of closure," the two-time Wimbledon winner, Murray, said.

"I just want the opportunity to play one more time out there, hopefully on Centre Court, and feel that buzz.

"Last year, I wasn't planning on it being my last year on the tour. I wanted to come back and play again, whereas this year I have no plans to do that."

Murray is also due to play in the doubles alongside older brother Jamie, though his chances of competing in both are slim.

He managed to get on the Wimbledon practice courts for the first time on Saturday and, after more training on Sunday, Murray admitted he would wait until the last possible moment to decide on his participation.

"It went pretty well," Murray said after training on Sunday, "but I still don’t have 100% feeling and sensation in my leg.

"It's getting better every single day. I want to give it every single chance that I can to get there.

"I'm going to play another set again [on Monday]. I'm doing some physical testing in the morning to see how far off I am from a physical perspective. Then I will probably make a decision after that."

Top seed Jannik Sinner will begin his Wimbledon campaign against Yannick Hanfmann, while defending champion Carlos Alcaraz will face Mark Lajal in the first round.

Seven-time winner Novak Djokovic, meanwhile, has been drawn to face qualifier Vit Kopriva in the first round, having appeared to confirm his participation at the year's third grand slam after recovering from knee surgery.

Djokovic initially said he would only play in SW19 if he felt he had a realistic chance of winning the title after withdrawing from the French Open, but on Thursday he gave reporters a thumbs up when asked if he would participate.

The Serbian is the second seed in the men's draw, putting him on the opposite side of the bracket to both Sinner and Alcaraz – who beat him in last year's final.

Two-time champion Andy Murray, meanwhile, will face Czech Tomas Machac first if he is fit to play after undergoing surgery on a back cyst last weekend.

The 37-year-old, who is expected to retire at the end of 2024, has said he will wait until the last minute before making a decision on his participation. 

The Scot could make his 16th appearance in the men's singles draw at SW19, surpassing Jeremy Bates for the outright most by any British player in the Open Era.

Murray is on the same side of the bracket as Djokovic, with fourth seed Alexander Zverev also a potential opponent for the Serbian down the line. The French Open runner-up faces Roberto Carballes Baena in his first match.

In the women's draw, world number one Iga Swiatek will begin her hunt for a first Wimbledon crown against American Sofia Kenin, with 2018 champion Angelique Kerber a potential third-round opponent for the Pole after she received a wild card.

Kerber is one of four former grand slam champions to receive a wild card into the women's draw, alongside Emma Raducanu, Naomi Osaka and Caroline Wozniacki.

Raducanu will start her campaign against 22nd seed Ekaterina Alexandrova after missing last year's tournament through injury. Osaka will begin against France's Diane Parry while Wozniacki faces Alycia Parks.

Coco Gauff, seeded second, will take on Caroline Dolehide in an all-American first-round matchup, while world number three Aryna Sabalenka faces another American in Emina Bektas.

Andy Murray is pushing to feature at Wimbledon, where he will play alongside his brother Jamie in the doubles should he be fit.

The All England Club confirmed on Thursday that 37-year-old Murray, who is hoping to feature at Wimbledon for what seems likely to be the final time in his illustrious career, had received a wildcard to team up with his younger sibling in the men's doubles.

Murray had a procedure on a back injury last weekend, but is now back in training.

The former world number one and two-time Wimbledon champion said he will wait as long as possible to make a decision on his participation in the singles event.

"I'm going to wait until the last minute to see if I'm going to be able to play and I've earned that right to do that," he said.

"This is not clear-cut where I am 100% going to be ready to play or there is a 0% chance that I can play. That is the situation.

"I would say it's probably more likely that I'm not able to play singles right now.

"Maybe it's my ego getting in the way but I feel that I deserve the opportunity to give it until the very last moment to make that decision.

"It's complicated, and it's made more complicated because I want to play at Wimbledon one more time.

"I want to have that opportunity to play [in] the tournament."

Murray is planning to retire later this year, as is another modern great, Rafael Nadal, who will skip Wimbledon in order to focus on preparing for the Olympics, where he will team up with Carlos Alcaraz to represent Spain.

Novak Djokovic has been nursing an injury, but should be fit to feature at the British grand slam.

Andy Murray will miss Wimbledon following surgery on a spinal cyst, the ATP has confirmed.

The two-time champion underwent the operation in a bid to be fit for the grass-court major, which begins on July 1.

Murray was forced to retire just five games into his second-round match against Jordan Thompson at Queen's Club earlier this week, having suffered back pain that eventually spread to his right leg.

The 37-year-old is expected to call time on his glittering career later this year, stating he "would rather finish at Wimbledon or an Olympic Games".

Although, the two-time Olympic gold medallist's spell on the sidelines means his participation at the latter, which begins on July 27, is now in doubt.

"After an operation on a spinal cyst, Andy Murray is sadly out of Wimbledon," the ATP posted on X. "Rest up and recover Andy, we'll miss seeing you there."

Andy Murray will undergo back surgery in an attempt to be fit for what will be his final appearance at Wimbledon, which begins in nine days. 

The two-time competition winner was forced to retire from his second-round match at the Queen's Championships against Jordan Thompson after just five games. 

It was later revealed by the 37-year-old that he had been suffering with back pain which eventually spread to his right leg, forcing him to withdraw from the competition. 

The two-time Olympic gold medallist is set to call time on his illustrious career later this year, with Wimbledon and the Paris games described as a fitting end to his 20-year spell on the court by Murray. 

But the former world number one faces a race against time to fit for Wimbledon, which starts on July 1, where he is also set to feature in the men's doubles with his older brother, Jamie. 

“He saw a specialist yesterday evening and he’s basically trying to decide what his next move is," his brother told BBC Two on Friday. 

"I don’t think it’s right for me to go into that personally, that’s up to him, but I think he has got a few decisions to make.

"It’s obviously incredibly disappointing for him that this was potentially going to be his last Queen’s, last Wimbledon and Olympics, and there’s a potential that that might not be able to happen.

"I think he’s got to make a few decisions, and see where he goes from there.”

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