Louisiana State University (LSU) Sophomore Brianna Lyston gave fans a signal of what is to come from her this season with a personal best and collegiate leading 7.07 to win the women’s 60m at the Razorback Invitational at the Tyson Center in Fayetteville on Saturday.

The 19-year-old, who entered the meet with a personal best of 7.29 done last season, first produced an easy 7.14 in qualifying before returning to run her new personal best in the final to win comfortably ahead of Georgia’s Kaila Jackson (7.20) and Florida’s Grace Stark (7.21).

Lyston’s time is the third-fastest in the world this year, fourth-fastest in collegiate history and equals the LSU school record done back in 2018 by Aleia Hobbs.

The men's equivalent saw USC's Travis Williams run 6.63 for third behind LSU's Myles Thomas (6.62) and USC's JC Stevenson (6.61).

Jamaican World Championship 4x400m relay medallist Stacey Ann Williams ran 51.86 to win the women’s open 400m ahead of Americans Kendall Ellis (52.12) and Bailey Lear (52.49). World Championships 400m hurdles finalist Andrenette Knight ran 52.53 for fifth.

Arkansas Junior and reigning Jamaican National champion Nickisha Pryce ran 51.58 for third in the college women’s 400m behind schoolmate Amber Anning (50.56) and Georgia’s Aaliyah Butler (51.34).

Pryce was a semi-finalist in the 400m at the World Championships in Budapest last August.

Florida Senior Jevaughn Powell ran 46.28 for third in the college men’s 400m behind USC’s William Jones (45.24) and Texas A&M’s Auhmad Robinson (46.15).

2023 NCAA Indoor and Outdoor champion and World Championship 100m hurdles finalist Ackera Nugent ran 7.94 for second in the women’s open 60m hurdles won by the USA’s Tia Jones in 7.85. Christina Clemons ran 7.95 for third.

Jamaica’s Phillip Lemonious, who won the NCAA Outdoor title competing for the University of Arkansas last season, ran 7.68 for third in the men’s 60m hurdles. Interestingly, the top two finishers in the race, Texas A&M’s Connor Schulman and Jaqualon Scott, also ran 7.68. Their times when rounded up to the thousandths were 7.672, 7.673 and 7.675.

St. Vincent's Shafiqua Maloney ran 2:02.29 to take top spot in the women's 800m ahead of Sanu Jallow of Arkansas (2:02.60) and Gabija Galvydyte (2:02.82).

In the field, Arkansas high jumper Romaine Beckford, the defending NCAA Indoor and Outdoor champion, improved his indoor career best to 2.27m with his victory on Friday evening.

The winning height moves Beckford to No. 4 on the UA all-time list and No. 3 on the Jamaican all-time indoor list with the equal No. 4 performance.

Having won the competition, Beckford opted for the Olympic standard of 2.33m as his next height and had three attempts with his last try coming closest to clearing.

Mississippi State’s Sherman Hawkins and USC’s Elias Gerald both cleared 2.17m for second and third, respectively.

Elsewhere in the field, Jamaican Oklahoma Junior Nikaoli Williams produced 7.86m for second in the men’s long jump behind Florida’s Malcolm Clemons (8.06m). Clemons’ teammate Caleb Foster jumped 7.68m for third.

 

 

The Wanda Diamond League has released a detailed summary of which disciplines will be staged at which meetings during the 2024 season.

In 2024, the world’s best athletes will once again take the stage in athletics’ premier one-day series, competing at 15 meetings across four different continents.

Athletes will compete for points in their chosen discipline at the 14 series meetings between April and September, with the most successful qualifying for the Wanda Diamond League Final in Brussels on September 13th-14th.

The season begins in Xiamen on April 20th, with the men’s 100m, women’s 200m and a 100/110m hurdles double bill among the headline events. Each discipline will then be staged at least four and up to eight times on the Road to the Final, giving athletes from across the globe enough opportunities to earn points.

Two meetings will be held at a different location in 2024 due to stadium renovation works in their usual locations. The Meeting International Mohammed VI will move from Rabat to Marrakech, while the Wanda Diamond League Shanghai will take place in Suzhou.

The 14 series meetings will each take place in a two-hour TV world programme and will all stage at least 14 Diamond Disciplines. The Wanda Diamond League Final in Brussels will be the only meeting to feature every single discipline, with all 32 Diamond League champions crowned over the course of two days.

The season calendar and the allocation of disciplines remain subject to change.

A list of disciplines for each meeting will also be available under the 'programme and results' page on each individual meeting website.

As well as the Diamond Disciplines, each meeting may also include additional disciplines in their programme, in which athletes will not earn points on the Road to the Final.

The disciplines are as follows: 100m (M,W), 200m (M,W), 400m (M,W), 800m (M,W), 1500m/Mile (M,W), 3000m/5000m (M,W), 3000m Steeplechase (M,W), 110m Hurdles (M), 100m Hurdles (W), 400m Hurdles (M,W), High Jump (M,W), Pole Vault (M,W), Long Jump (M,W), Triple Jump (M,W), Shot Put (M,W), Discus Throw (M,W), Javelin Throw (M,W).

Jamaica’s national 800m record holder, Navasky Anderson, can now also call himself a university graduate after graduating from the Mississippi State University with a Master's Degree on Friday.

Anderson, who became the first and only Jamaican man to go sub 1:45.00 when he ran 1:44.70 at the DC Track Championships in July, began his collegiate career at the Essex Community College in 2019 before transferring to Mississippi State in 2020.

“My time at Mississippi State University has been nothing short of transformative, thanks to the exceptional support from both the athletics and academia staff,” Anderson said in an Instagram post on Friday.

“Juggling the demands of coursework and the rigor of track and field requires a delicate balance, and it’s collaboration between the athletic and academic realms that allowed me to thrive,” he added.

During his time at MSU, Anderson claimed 800m silver at the 2022 NCAA Division 1 Outdoor Championships and represented Jamaica for the first time, with his best result being a bronze medal at this year’s Pan American Games in Chile in November.

The 23-year-old former St. Jago student also donned the Jamaican colors at the 2022 and 2023 World Championships in Eugene and Budapest, respectively, as well as the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham where he placed fifth in the final.

“As I stand here today, wearing the cap and gown that symbolizes the culmination of years of hard work, I extend my deepest gratitude to Mississippi State University Athletics and the academic faculty. Their unwavering support and commitment to my holistic development have been the driving force behind this significant achievement,” Anderson said.

Jamaica’s Navasky Anderson copped his first senior medal for the country with bronze in the men’s 800m at the 2023 Pan American Games in Santiago, Chile on Saturday.

The 23-year-old, who represented Jamaica at the World Championships in Budapest where he was disqualified in the heats, produced 1:46.40 for third in Saturday’s final behind Mexico’s Jesus Lopez (1:46.04) and Venezuela’s Jose Antonio Maita (1:45.69).

Anderson broke his own Jamaican national record earlier this season when he ran 1:44.70 at the DC Track Championships on July 30 to achieve the World Championship qualifying standard.

Jamaican 800m specialist Natoya Goule-Toppin rebounded from a disappointing outing at the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest where she failed to reach the final by establishing a new national 800m record at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene, Oregon on Sunday.

Goule-Toppin finished third in the race behind American superstar Athing Mu, who rebounded from a bronze medal at the World Championships with an American Record 1:54.97 to win, and British World Championship silver medallist Keely Hodgkinson who ran a British Record 1:55.19 in second.

Goule-Toppin’s time in third was 1:55.96, bettering her own previous national record 1:56.15 set back in 2018.

Despite not taking the win on Sunday, the 32-year-old was delighted to end her season with that performance.

“I wanted the win because I know I have the ability to do it but I’m really happy with the third especially the national record,” Goule-Toppin said.

“I’ve been longing to run 1:55 and today was the day. The last one was the best one. It’s the last race of the season and I’m going home happy,” she added.

Goule-Toppin had been flirting with a sub 1:56 time for a number of years and she says the presence of competitors like Mu, Hodgkinson and World Champion Mary Moraa, who finished fourth, pushed her to this time.

“I kept saying once I stay with them I know I’ll run fast as well so when I saw 1:54, I knew I ran something fast but I didn’t know what it was. I was congratulating the girls then I looked back, saw my name and started rejoicing,” she said.

The 2018 Commonwealth Games bronze medallist also gave credit to the man above for her exploits on Sunday.

“I was patient and I prayed a lot. I said God, let your will be done and just help me to go out there and be strong and smart,” she said.

“All day I was talking to myself. It sounds crazy but I kept saying run through the line. Before I went out, my coach said the same thing,” she added.

 

Reigning double-sprint Olympic Champion, Elaine Thompson-Herah continues to show signs of a potential return to top form in 2024 after a season’s best 10.92 to win at the Gala dei Castelli, a World Athletics Continental Tour Silver meet in Bellinzola, Switzerland on Monday.

Thompson-Herah, who has endured a season riddled with injuries, took the win ahead of Great Britain’s Imani Lansiquot (10.99), her first time below 11 seconds, and Gambia’s Gina Bass (11.12).

This was only Thompson-Herah’s second 100m race since finishing fifth at the Jamaican trials in July. She ran 11.00 for second at the Zurich Diamond League on August 31.

The 31-year-old was a member of Jamaica’s silver medal 4x100m team at the recently concluded World Championships in Budapest where she ran in the heats.

On the men’s side, Oblique Seville ran 10.01 to take the win ahead of Kenya’s Ferdinand Omanyala (10.04) and South Africa’s Akani Simbine (10.12).

Seville narrowly missed out on a medal in Budapest, finishing fourth in 9.88, the same time credited to bronze medallist, Zharnel Hughes.

Another 100m finalist in Budapest, Ryiem Forde, was seventh in 10.28 on Monday.

Natoya Goule-Toppin rebounded from a sub-par showing in Budapest to take the 800m in 1:57.53, a new meet record.

The USA’s Addison Wiley ran a personal best 1:57.64 in second while Switzerland’s Audrey Werro ran a national record 1:58.13 in third.

Puerto Rico’s Jasmine Camacho-Quinn, who was upset by Danielle Williams in Budapest, came out on top with a meet record 12.56 in the 100m hurdles. The Netherlands’ Nadine Visser ran a season’s best 12.61 in second while the USA’s Nia Ali ran 12.63 in third.

Shashalee Forbes, a member of Jamaica's silver-medal winning 4x100m team in Budapest, ran 22.74 for second in the 200m behind the USA's Tamara Clark (22.64). Italy's Dalia Kaddari ran 22.86 for third.

Orlando Bennett ran 13.40 for third in the men’s 110m hurdles won by Switzerland’s Jason Joseph in 13.18. Senegal’s Louis Francois Mendy was second in 13.29.

In the field, 2019 World Championship silver-medallist Fedrick Dacres threw 66.19m for third in the discus behind World Champion Daniel Stahl (67.24m) and Kristjan Ceh (67.15m).

Adelle Tracey had one of the best weeks of her career at last week’s IAAF World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

The Seattle, Washington-born Jamaican started her week with a 4:03.67 effort to advance to the semi-finals of the women’s 1500m.

A day later in the semi-finals, Tracey brought out her best and produced a time that would have been good enough to get to any other major championship final with 3:58.77. That effort is a national record and makes Tracey the first Jamaican woman to dip below 4:00 in the 1500m.

Despite Tracey’s time being seventh-fastest overall in the semis, she failed to advance to the final due to a seventh-place finish in her individual semi-final. The top six finishers in the two semi-finals advance to the final.

Tracey’s chance for redemption came in the 800m where, on August 23, she finished second in her heat with 1:59.82, a season’s best at the time, to make it to the semi-finals.

Two days later, the 30-year-old produced a personal best 1:58.99 to finish fourth in her semi-final and advance to the final as one of the two fastest losers.

The final then saw Tracey once again lower her personal best, this time clocking 1:58.41 to finish seventh.

“5 rounds, 3 PB's in one week, x2 2024 Olympic QT's, a National 1500m Record, and all the smiles doing it!!” Tracey said in a social media post on Monday.

“I am so grateful for the progress and every step of this process! Special thanks to my team and to everyone for all their support,” she added.

Tracey will next line up in the 800m at the Zurich Diamond League on Thursday.

Great Britain’s Keely Hodgkinson insisted it is only a matter of time before she ends her silver streak with gold.

The 21-year-old was beaten to 800 metres gold at the World Championships by Kenya’s Mary Moraa in Budapest, just 13 months after she also finished second in Eugene.

Hodgkinson’s silver was added to by two 4x400m relay bronze medals on the final day meaning Great British finish with 10 – their joint best at the World Championships, level with Stuttgart in 1993.

She clocked one minute 56.34 seconds with defending champion Athing Mu in third and GB’s Jemma Reekie fifth.

Hodgkinson had been beaten into silver by Mu at last year’s World Championships before Moraa took gold at the Commonwealth Games ahead of her.

Before the final the Olympic silver medallist admitted she owed them both and feels gold is within her grasp.

She said: “I wanted to come here to get gold but it’s another podium and consistency has been the word I’ve been using. It’s three silvers now so it should be at one point I’m going to get a gold, it’s just a matter of when.

“I’m happy with my performance, gutted I didn’t come out on top but it’s great to be up there with the top three in the world.

“Mary got the jump on us and you can’t really afford that with those two girls. It was a really good race from us all.

“It keeps me on my toes. I’m trying to keep the streak going where I consistently pick up medals. It’s that tiny one per cent so I’ll keep striving towards it.”

Hodgkinson was unable to match Moraa’s pace in the home straight as the Kenyan won in one minute 53.03s but at least overhauled Mu with 50m remaining.

The Briton added: “To be consistently up with the best in the world is all I want from my career. I did think I was going to come through on the inside. The line just came quicker than I thought it would.

“I gave it my all, like I always do. I don’t think I put a foot wrong. I do love it. I was really looking forward to it. I was really up for it. I really did believe I was going to win again – you’ve got to believe, that is half the battle.

“It is a different order to last year, who knows what order it will be next year (at the Olympics)?

“It’s an Olympic year – everyone brings even more of their A game than they usually do. There is no stone left unturned. Like I say, we’ll aim for gold again and see what happens.”

Reekie, who split from long-term coach Andy Young in March, was third with 200m left but could not keep pace in the home straight.

She said: “I am proud of the way I ran it. I was brave and I went out, it was probably just a bit hot in the first lap.

“I am proud of the way I ran this season. I went to Jon (Bigg, coach) in an absolute mess and our goal was always to run under two minutes again consistently. To be here in the final is exciting for next year.”

Later, the men’s 4x400m relay team of Alex Haydock-Wilson. Charlie Dobson, Lewis Davey and Rio Mitcham won bronze behind the USA and France.

The women’s squad of Laviai Nielsen, Amber Anning, Ama Pipi and Nicole Yeargin also claimed third in a dramatic finish which saw the Netherlands beat Jamaica on the line after a stunning run from Femke Bol.

Morgan Lake finished fourth in the high jump after a clearance of 1.97m.

Great Britain’s Keely Hodgkinson insisted it is only a matter of time before she ends her silver streak with gold.

The 21-year-old was beaten to 800 metres gold at the World Championships by Kenya’s Mary Moraa in Budapest, just 13 months after she also finished second in Eugene.

Hodgkinson’s silver was added to by two 4x400m relay bronze medals on the final day meaning Great British finish with 10 – their joint best at the World Championships, level with Stuttgart in 1993.

She clocked one minute 56.34 seconds with defending champion Athing Mu in third and GB’s Jemma Reekie fifth.

Hodgkinson had been beaten into silver by Mu at last year’s World Championships before Moraa took gold at the Commonwealth Games ahead of her.

Before the final the Olympic silver medallist admitted she owed them both and feels gold is within her grasp.

She said: “I wanted to come here to get gold but it’s another podium and consistency has been the word I’ve been using. It’s three silvers now so it should be at one point I’m going to get a gold, it’s just a matter of when.

“I’m happy with my performance, gutted I didn’t come out on top but it’s great to be up there with the top three in the world.

“Mary got the jump on us and you can’t really afford that with those two girls. It was a really good race from us all.

“It keeps me on my toes. I’m trying to keep the streak going where I consistently pick up medals. It’s that tiny one per cent so I’ll keep striving towards it.”

Hodgkinson was unable to match Moraa’s pace in the home straight as the Kenyan won in one minute 53.03s but at least overhauled Mu with 50m remaining.

The Briton added: “To be consistently up with the best in the world is all I want from my career. I did think I was going to come through on the inside. The line just came quicker than I thought it would.

“I gave it my all, like I always do. I don’t think I put a foot wrong. I do love it. I was really looking forward to it. I was really up for it. I really did believe I was going to win again – you’ve got to believe, that is half the battle.

“It is a different order to last year, who knows what order it will be next year (at the Olympics)?

“It’s an Olympic year – everyone brings even more of their A game than they usually do. There is no stone left unturned. Like I say, we’ll aim for gold again and see what happens.”

Reekie, who split from long-term coach Andy Young in March, was third with 200m left but could not keep pace in the home straight.

She said: “I am proud of the way I ran it. I was brave and I went out, it was probably just a bit hot in the first lap.

“I am proud of the way I ran this season. I went to Jon (Bigg, coach) in an absolute mess and our goal was always to run under two minutes again consistently. To be here in the final is exciting for next year.”

Later, the men’s 4x400m relay team of Alex Haydock-Wilson. Charlie Dobson, Lewis Davey and Rio Mitcham won bronze behind the USA and France.

The women’s squad of Laviai Nielsen, Amber Anning, Ama Pipi and Nicole Yeargin also claimed third in a dramatic finish which saw the Netherlands beat Jamaica on the line after a stunning run from Femke Bol.

Morgan Lake finished fourth in the high jump after a clearance of 1.97m.

Kenya’s Mary Moraa won a thrilling 800m final on Sunday’s final day of the 2023 World Athletics Championships in Budapest, Hungary

Against a stacked field, Moraa ran a tactically brilliant race staying on the shoulder of the USA’s Athing Mu, the 2022 world champion, before powering past her down the home stretch to take victory in 1:56.02.

Great Britain’s Keely Hodgkinson, who stayed off the pace for most of the race, stormed through to overtake Mu late and take silver in 1:56.34.

Mu, who has raced sparingly this season, finishing third in 1:56.61.

Jamaica’s Adelle Tracey, who clocked a lifetime best 1:58.99 in her semi-final, produced another lifetime best of 1:58.41 for seventh place.

Adelle Tracey successfully advanced to the final of the women’s 800m at the IAAF World Athletics Championships on Friday in Budapest.

Tracey produced a personal best 1:58.99 to advance to the final as one of the fastest losers after finishing fourth in the third semi-final. Mary Moraa (1:58.48), Athing Mu (1:58.78) and Halimah Nakaayi (1:58.89) were the top three finishers in the race.

This continues an excellent week for Tracey. She also competed in the 1500m, running a national record 3:58.77 in the semi-finals.

Natoya Goule-Toppin competed in the second of three semi-finals but failed to advance after running 2:00.78 to finish third behind Great Britain’s Jemma Reekie (2:00.28) and the USA’s Raevyn Rogers (2:00.47).

Navasky Anderson failed to advance from the heats of the Men’s 800m on day four of the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Budapest on Tuesday.

Anderson, who ran a national record 1:44.70 in July to qualify for the championships, was only able to produce 1:45.81 for fifth in heat two.

After seven heats, Anderson’s time was just .05 slower than the final non-automatic qualifying time.

The 23-year-old also failed to advance from the heats at last year’s edition in Eugene.

Roshawn Clarke and Antonio Watson were among a number of Caribbean winners at Friday’s Ed Murphey Classic in Memphis, Tennessee, a meet serving as a final tune-up for a number of athletes before the World Championships beginning August 19 in Budapest.

Clarke, the 19-year-old sensation fresh off a world junior record equaling 47.85 to claim his first national senior title last month, ran 48.52 to take the win at the Wolfe Track & Field Complex.

Nigerian Nathaniel Ezekiel, who took bronze at the NCAA Championships competing for Baylor University, was not far behind Clarke in second with 48.55 while American David Kendziera ran 48.77 for third.

Watson, the 21-year-old who will be competing at his first World Championships in Budapest, took a big scalp in the 400m with 44.69 to win ahead of Grenadian World and Olympic Champion Kirani James who produced 44.92 in second. American Justin Robinson ran 45.09 in third.

Watson finished second behind Sean Bailey at the Jamaican Championships last month in a personal best 44.54.

Moving over to the 100m where Oblique Seville, who finished third at the National Championships, ran 9.98 for second in the Invitational A-race on Friday.

The race was won by 2022 World Championship silver medallist, Marvin Bracy-Williams of the USA, in 9.96 while Christian Coleman, the 2019 World Champion, was third in 10.03.

BVI’s Rikkoi Brathwaite and Guyana’s Emmanuel Archibald were both top three finishers in the Invitational B-race. Brathwaite ran a personal best 10.09 for second while Archibald ran 10.14, also a personal best, in third. Liberia’s Emmanuel Matadi ran 10.00 to take the win.

Jamaica’s Ashanti Moore and Natalliah Whyte ran 11.18 and 11.26 for first and third, respectively, in the Women’s Invitational B-race. The USA’s Maia McCoy ran 11.24 for second.

Guyana’s Jasmine Abrams ran 11.41 for second in the Women’s Open 100m behind the USA’s Candace Hill (11.29). Kristina Knott of the Philippines was third in 11.47.

Racers Track Club’s Michael Stephens ran 10.28 for second in the Men’s equivalent won by the USA’s Ameer Webb in 10.17. Demarius Smith ran 10.31 in third.

Two-time national champion, Andrew Hudson, ran 20.51 for third in the Men’s Pro 200m. Olympic Champion, Andre DeGrasse, ran 20.19 for a comfortable win ahead of the USA’s Kyree King (20.45).

Jamaica’s Natalliah Whyte ran 22.76 to win the Women’s Open 200m ahead of American Talitha Diggs (22.83) and Nigeria’s Favour Ofili (22.94).

In the Women’s Pro 800m, St. Vincent & the Grenadines’ Shafiqua Maloney ran a personal best 1:59.94, her first time under two minutes, for second behind the USA’s Addy Wiley (1:59.00). Uganda’s Susan Aneno was third in 1:59.95.

The Men’s Pro 800m saw Jamaican national champion, Rajay Hamilton, run 1:46.72 for second behind Kenya’s Festus Lagat (1:46.72). American Abe Alvarado ran 1:46.82 in third.

Dejour Russell ran 13.47 for second in the Men’s Open 110m hurdles. The race was won by the USA’s Michael Dickson in 13.37 while his countryman Dylan Beard ran 13.60 in third.

In the field, Chanice Porter produced 6.67m to take the win in the Women’s long jump ahead of USA’s Tiffany Flynn (6.46m) and Nigeria’s Ruth Usoro (6.42m).

Newly crowned Jamaican champion and national record holder, Rajindra Campbell, threw 21.59m for third in the Men’s shot put behind the American pair of Joe Kovacs (21.72m) and Tripp Piperi (21.67m).

Bermuda’s Jah-Nhai Perinchief produced 16.85m for second in the Men’s triple jump behind American Donald Scott (16.94m). Another American, Chris Bernard, jumped 16.77m for third.

In a breathtaking display of determination and skill, Navasky Anderson etched his name in the history books as he set a new national record and met the World Athletics Championships qualifying standard for the 800m event on deadline day, Sunday.

With mere hours remaining to secure a spot on Jamaica's team for the World Athletics Championships in Budapest next month, Anderson rose to the occasion and delivered a historic run at the DC Track Championships, held at the Thomas O. Berg Track in Washington DC.

Just a week after running a commendable season's best of 1:45.70 at the Under Armour Sunset Tour meeting in Los Angeles, Anderson shaved off a full second from his time. Crossing the finish line in a remarkable 1:44.70, he not only shattered his own national record of 1:45.02 set during the NCAA Division 1 Outdoor Championships on June 10, 2022, but he also became the first Jamaican man to break the 1:45.00 barrier for the 800m.

The DC Track Championships proved to be a thrilling contest, with Anderson finishing second in the race behind Edose Ibadin, who clocked an impressive 1:44.65. Despite the intense competition, Anderson's remarkable performance secured him a coveted spot on Jamaica's team to Budapest.

Throughout the race, Anderson showcased his speed and endurance, running the first 400m in 50.43 before closing the final lap in 54.27.

The performance was the result of his unwavering dedication and perseverance which allowed him to overcome the challenges of battling through injuries for much of the season.

Just a week prior to this outstanding achievement, Anderson had expressed his struggles with injuries during the past collegiate season, which affected his performance at the NCAA Division Championships. However, his faith and determination never wavered, and he continued to work tirelessly towards his goals.

“All glory to God, 1:45.70,” he posted after his season best last week.

“I would be lying if I didn’t say it’s been a rough season, tempted with injuries I felt like I was just failing at everything but through it all I survived and still had faith.”

That faith paid off on Sunday.

 

Jamaican 800m national record holder, Navasky Anderson, expressed gratitude after running a season’s best 1:45.70, the second fastest time of his career, to finish second at the Under Armour Sunset Tour in Los Angeles on Saturday.

American Isaiah Harris took the win with 1:44.85 while John Rivera was third in 1:45.80.

The 23-year-old has had what he described as a “rough” 2023 season following up from an outstanding breakthrough year in 2022.

Prior to Saturday’s race, only his fifth race of the season, the Mississippi State Junior had a season’s best of 1:47.67 which he did to finish as runner-up at the National Championships earlier in July.

“I would be lying if I didn’t say it’s been a rough season, tempted with injuries, moments I felt like everything was going wrong, times when I felt like I was just failing everything but, through it all, I survived and I still had faith,” Anderson said in a post in Instagram after the race.

Anderson had an excellent season in 2022. The high point came at the NCAA Outdoor Championships in June where the former St. Jago man ran a personal best and national record 1:45.02 to finish second.

He went on to claim his first maiden Jamaican title later that month before competing at both the World Championships in Eugene and the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham. He reached the final in Birmingham, running 1:48.75 for fifth.

Although he won’t be at this year’s World Championships in Budapest having failed to achieve the 1:44.70 qualifying standard, Anderson believes that he will be able to get back to his 2022 self in the future.

“It’s not going to be easy, it’s going to be a challenge but those bad moments can be channeled into great performances. I’m still learning and stepping out into a new world…the world of elites and I’m ready to take on the world and do what I was born to do,” he said.

 

 

 

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