Fraser-Pryce breaking Flo Jo’s world record would be bigger achievement than Bolt. Can she do the impossible?

By Sports Desk June 12, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce once again defied all expectations by clocking the fastest time run over 100m by a woman in 33 years, and, in the process, inched closer to one of the most enduring records in all of sports, Florence Griffith-Joyner’s 10.49.

With the Olympic Games fast approaching on the horizon, but still plenty of time left to go even faster, Fraser-Pryce, the most dominant force in women’s sprinting for over a decade, must certainly have her eyes set on the only prize that has eluded her thus far.

But, even Fraser-Pryce’s sparkling new personal best time of 10.63, which sets her up as a prohibitive favourite for a third 100m title at this summer’s Olympic Games, is still 0.14th of a second off the long-standing, iron-clad mark set by the American in 1988. 

For many who watched Fraser-Pryce's race, however, as impressive as it was, the time seems to have been set with the athlete having something in reserve.  Knowing Fraser-Pryce, the question of how much faster can she go is one that will only be answered when the lights are brightest on the Tokyo Games world stage.   She has freely admitted that, despite the fast time, she had only been focused on executing the race properly and the thought of running 10.6 had not crossed her mind. 

Since it was set at the USA trial in 1988, Flo-Jo’s record has continued to court controversy.  While some have pointed to unsubstantiated claims of drug use, some scholars have argued that the wind reading for the event could not have been correct.  The athlete’s time of 10.49 was recorded with a wind reading of 0.0, despite, according to reports and footage analysis, there being clear evidence of wind at the venue.  Despite that, it, however, remains on World Athletics books as the target to beat.

With all the controversy surrounding the record and how much the unbeatable mark has weighed down women’s sprinting, Fraser-Pryce managing to break the time would arguably be a bigger achievement than the 100m time set by Bolt.  Prior to Bolt breaking the record the first time in 2008 (9.72), the previous holder was Asafa Powell who ran 9.74 and that was in 2007 and before that Powell again in 2005.  Female sprinters have craned their necks to look up at Flo-Jo’s mark for 33 years.

In an illustrious career, Fraser-Pryce has made it a habit of rewriting the rules in terms of what’s possible.  At 34-years-old she has not only said but proven that age is just a number and repeatedly silenced doubters with her work ethic, patience, and determination.

When she struck gold in the women’s 100m, at the Doha World Championships, she became the oldest female sprinter to win a global 100m title, amazingly, two years later she is running even faster than that.

Related items

  • Manning and DaCosta Cup competitions to kick off mid-November after government greenlights resumption of schoolboy football Manning and DaCosta Cup competitions to kick off mid-November after government greenlights resumption of schoolboy football

     The Jamaican government has given the Inter-Secondary School Sports Association (ISSA) the green light for the staging of schoolboy football this season. As such, ISSA said it is now finalizing arrangements to commence the Manning Cup and DaCosta Cup on Friday, November 12 or Saturday, November 13.

  • 'We watched it and got goosebumps' - Windies still use Brathwaite heroics as motivation claims Pollard 'We watched it and got goosebumps' - Windies still use Brathwaite heroics as motivation claims Pollard

    West Indies captain, Kieron Pollard, says the team’s famous victory over England at the 2016 World Cup still serves as motivation as they look to open their title defense against the same opponents on Saturday.

    In the 2016 final, the Caribbean team needed an improbable 19 off the final over before Carlos Brathwaite famously smacked four 6s off Ben Stokes to give the team its second world title.

    Although Brathwaite is not in the squad this time around and admitting that things are not quite the same, Pollard insists the moment is a good reference point, which serves as an example of triumphing despite heavy odds in adversity.

    “What Carlos did in those four deliveries, in that last over, it’s unbelievable.  It’s something we saw as a team last night and it brought goosebumps back to us,” Pollard told members of the media on Friday.

    “For us to be in that situation and get over the line, it shows that never say die attitude.  As a team, we hope to replicate winning the entire tournament, and those kinds of moments, they stick with us.  Hopefully, we can go out and play good enough cricket to get back in that kind of position, so we can be in another final and have some memories going forward,” he added.

    “I don’t think it will have much bearing on the game (against England) because it’s another game of cricket and that situation was totally different it being a final, but we are looking to come out and give a good account of ourselves.”

     

     

     

  • 'Windies have worked hard to improve strike rotation' - Pollard hopes to see better movement between crease for World Cup 'Windies have worked hard to improve strike rotation' - Pollard hopes to see better movement between crease for World Cup

    West Indies captain Kieron Pollard is confident the team has done enough work to address concerns surrounding an inability to rotate the strike ahead of the start of the T20 World Cup.

    The Caribbean side will open the tournament on Saturday against England but despite being defending champions will have several questions to answer.  One of those recurring issues has been the ratio of the team’s use of traditional hitting versus rotating the strike with singles.

    In the past, the Windies have had success with their power-hitting game, winning the tournament twice in just such a fashion.  In recent years, however, the team has shown a propensity to get bogged down looking for boundaries.  Pollard, however, insists that the team has been looking to address the issue, but were at the same time not looking to get away from their style of play.

    “A lot of work has been done behind the scenes.  The guys have worked tirelessly to get to where we are right now in terms of trying to cover our bases,” Pollard told members of the media on Friday.

    “I’ve said before that we try to keep our strengths and work on our weaknesses.  We’ve accepted certain things and gone back behind the scenes and hopefully, we will see a difference,” he added.

    “In terms of the two games that we played, guys didn’t show that intent and different things might have come out but we are confident that the guys have done what is needed and will look to hit the ground running come the first game.”

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.