All set for second Manchester Capital 5K

By Sports Desk December 08, 2023

Manchester High School recently launched the second staging of the Manchester Capital Run, with strong support from the business community and other organizations in the parish.

Mayor Councillor Donovan Mitchell led the charge from a long list of sponsors when he announced that his organization will contribute $500,000 towards the school's 5K Run/Walk, which is scheduled for this Sunday December 10 at 6:30 am.

Member of parliament Rhoda Moy Crawford, and track and field coach Jerry Holness, former head of the school's sports department, have also thrown their support behind the event.

The Honourable Custos Rotulorum Lt. Col. Garfield Sean Green and Mrs. Natalee Nugent-Welcome of the Ministry of Education both endorsed the event and promised to be at the start line along with some their contemporaries to go the full distance, as well as to welcome the finishers they lead home.

Manchester High school chairman, Vincent Marshall also promised to run for the cause.

Principal Jasford Gabriel expressed confidence that they could achieve the $10 million target for this edition which follows the inaugural staging in 2017. The funds will help to defray the high cost of maintaining the various sports programmes at the school.

According to Gabriel, Manchester High competes in Track and Field, Football, Cricket, Netball, Badminton, Table Tennis and several other sports, which are all costly to maintain in terms of transportation, nutrition, medical, field/court costs, coaches and other support staff fees. Importantly, he said that sports help the students in many ways including time management, behaviour and their focus at school.

Race director and coach at Manchester High Kadia Flemmings said the competitors will share in a number of prizes including cash and trophies for overall winners, male and female in walk and run, age categories, high school team categories along with corporate groups.

The fees are adults - $1,800, students - $700, and $1,500 per person in groups.

Flemmings pointed out that it was only fitting that the school hosts its own 5K run/walk, as it has a rich history of performance in the middle and long distances. He mentioned Linton McKenzie, Delroy Hayden, Norval Jones, George Turbo Powell, Winston Skinnyman Taylor, Hilda Baker, the Turners sisters, and in more recent times Olympian Natoya Goule-Toppin, who specializes in the 800 metres.

Manchester High boasts a several Olympians, most of whom endorsed the event. The Olympians, who attended the school include Elaine Thompson-Herah, Sherone Simpson, Nesta Carter, Chanice Porter, Sheri-Ann Brooks, Omar Mcleod and Lorraine Fenton-Graham.

This event will start at Ward Avenue and end at Manchester High School gate. The route reads: Ward Avenue to Andrews Memorial Church, left onto West Road out to Greenvale Rd, make a left and travel straight to Manchester High School.

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     "My goal over her career here at LSU is to make her an elite 100m sprinter because I think that as a professional track and field athlete, your ability to earn money is better in the hundred than it is being a 200m," he explained.

    “But it's still in the early stages. We need to get to where she's just a beast all the time because that's like Shelly Ann, that's like Elaine Thompson. Those people that are just durable and you can always count on them.”

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    "In the shorter sprint races, we had her pretty well prepared. She's been accelerating quite well, and her top-end speed, obviously, has always been pretty good. But I think the biggest change for her, in her development at this point, is she's just physically a little stronger than what she was when she came in August," Coach Shaver told Sportsmax.TV in an exclusive interview.

    "And I think it's made a big difference this year, her second year here. I was very patient with her last year because I know how talented she is and how important it is that we take good care of her and have her prepared for summertime, too."

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    Coach Shaver believes in Lyston's competitive spirit, sharing that she can run lifetime bests later this summer. "I think realistically, I'm more about consistency than what the PR time is. But I think if anybody, as a collegian, can consistently line up and run 10.90 on a fairly regular basis, then when you get towards championship time, or in her case, maybe the Jamaican trials, or maybe if she makes the team with Jamaica to represent in Paris, which is obviously probably one of her goals, is to be able to do that.

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    Highlighting the importance of patience in Lyston's journey, Coach Shaver emphasized injury prevention and physical development. "That's kind of been our outlook with everybody that's talented like her here at LSU. You know, we've always tried to show patience and give them a chance to mature," he remarked.

    "I still think she has room for growth. And I think that's where the patience and the education part of how the training helps you overcome that also, when we're talking about, you know, strength training and so forth.

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