Jamaica School of Gymnastics, Westmoreland Gymnastics and Painite Gymnastics excel at meets in the USA and Barbados over the weekend

By Sports Desk April 08, 2024

Competitors from the Jamaica School of Gymnastics had an excellent showing at the Cats Beach Blast held at the Palm Beach Central High School in Florida from April 6-7.

The 19-member team managed to take home nine gold, six silver and seven bronze medals. The team also claimed two first place and three third place trophies.

The team placed first in the Level Two gymnast category. Juanique Hunter had scores of 9.5 and 9.350 to take gold in the beam and bars, respectively.

“I’m very proud of myself. I never expected to get first on bars because I know I’m bad on bars but I’m really proud of myself for getting first overall,” Hunter said.

Elissa Edwards took gold in the floors and vault with scores of 9.500 and 9.175.

“I wasn’t really expecting to get first place, I was more expecting fourth of fifth because I did bad on beams but I’m really happy to get another first-place trophy,” she said.

In the Level One gymnast category, Isabel Misir had a score of 9.1 to win the vault while Malkia Robinson produced 9.75 to win the bars.

Elsewhere, Westmoreland Gymnastics and Painite Gymnastics located in Manchester competed in Barbados as a combined team at the Trident Classic at the Sir Garfield Sobers Gymnasium in Wildey on April 6.

The team came first overall in their category and had a medal count of 46 all in the first, second and third places.

They also captured seven trophies and took home the first-place trophy for the pre-comp category.

“It’s truly a good look for the sport of Gymnastics having three clubs competing overseas over the weekend. They made a mark for Jamaica in winning both the teams and individual events,” said President of the Jamaica Gymnastics Association, Nicole Grant.

“It truly speaks volumes about the development of our coaches who are now better able to understand the technicalities of the sport and passing it on to the athletes who are just eager and happy to learn and improve day by day,” she added.

 

 

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