T&T's Dylan Carter wins 50m butterfly to make it three from three on Berlin leg of FINA World Cup

By October 24, 2022
Dylan Carter Dylan Carter

Trinidad and Tobago’s Dylan Carter won his third gold medal at the opening leg of the FINA Swimming World Cup in Berlin, Germany on Sunday.

The 26-year-old Caribbean swimming star capped off a golden weekend when won the 50m butterfly in  22.13. In his wake was South Africa's Chad Le Clos (22.21) and Italy's Matteo Rivolta (22.38), who won silver and bronze, respectively.

“Now I just need to learn how to swim breaststroke,” joked Carter, whose win takes him into second place in the overall points standings behind South African Mat Sates.

 “It gives me some confidence. I’m racing the best in the world here, so hopefully I can stay up here.”

On Friday, Carter won the 50m freestyle, in a new national record of 20.77 seconds before winning the 50m backstroke on Saturday in 23.15.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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