Fastest man in fastest electric vehicle: Bolt tries hand at Formula E racing

By Sports Desk January 14, 2024

Eight-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt is known for his supremacy in track and field, but the former sprinter has ventured onto another track, delving into Formula E racing.

The eight-time Olympic gold medallist made a surprise guest appearance as part of a promotion: the fastest man in the fastest electric vehicle, driving the record-breaking GenBETA car ahead of the main event and taking part in the grid walk just prior to the race on Saturday.

Bolt is a well-known fan of Formula 1 racing and has been spotted at various Grand Prix races for the prestigious motor racing competition.

Unlike Formula 1, which showcases hybrid race cars with engines powered by traditional fuel sources, the ABB FIA Formula E World Championship features all-electric race cars.

Bolt holds the men’s 100m world record of 9.58 seconds, but smashed that time - obviously - in the specially modified version of the Gen3 car used in Formula E races, piling through the 100m track in 4.36s.

“This is the first time in my life I’m comfortable saying something is faster than me,” he joked.

“It is like a rocket ship on wheels. Getting the chance to drive it was a mind-blowing experience. The power from the start was such a surprise and the adrenaline you got is on a different level, easily. Driving the GenBETA was like nothing I’ve experienced before; I was told that as soon as you drive, you don’t want to stop or get out and they were right. I would do it every day if I could.”

Bolt was also gifted a helmet by Formula E World Champion driver Jake Dennis.

The helmet incorporates a green and black colour scheme and features the Jamaican flag, Bolt’s name, and his trademark “to di worl” logo, which showcases his iconic celebratory victory pose.

In addition to meeting Dennis and speaking with former F1 star and Formula E TV presenter David Coulthard, Bolt was also introduced to Bajan Formula 2 driver Zane Maloney. Maloney will serve as a development driver and reserve driver in Formula E’s 10th season.

 

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