Tringale surges into 3M Open lead as overnight leaders slide

By Sports Desk July 24, 2021

Cam Tringale moved into the lead ahead of the final day at the 3M Open in Minnesota after carding a five-under round including an eagle on Saturday.

The American raced up the leaderboard as overnight joint leaders Ryan Armour and Adam Hadwin and slid, with an even round and two-over respectively at TPC Twin Cities.

Tringale's surge was set up after becoming only the third player to reach the par-five 12th in two, sitting at 12 under after 54 holes.

He enjoyed a bogey-free third round, birdieing his first two holes, with only Beau Hossler, who is joint for 12th, bettering his round on Saturday with a six-under-65.

Gary Woodland and Maverick McNealy are joint in second on 11 under after strong third day rounds.

Pat Perez, Cameron Champ, Jimmy Walker and Charl Schwartzel are all 10 under. Champ looms large having carded 10 under from his past 27 holes.

Rickie Fowler appeared set to contend again but carded an eight on the 18th hole to finish six off the lead having found the water.

He was not alone in struggling on the 18th which saw five bogeys, three double bogeys and seven triple bogeys or worse.

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    And McIlroy, who has remained fiercely loyal to the PGA Tour, sees the dispute as harmful for players on both sides of the divide, telling reporters: "I don't want a fractured game. I never have.

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    "It's no good for anyone. There is a time and a place for it. I just think right now, with where everything is, it's probably not the right time.

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    "I would just say the ball is in their court," McIlroy told the BBC.

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