The Masters: 'I don't know how many I have in me' – Woods relishing every second at Augusta

By Sports Desk April 04, 2023

Tiger Woods plans to relish every moment when he makes his 25th start at the Masters this week, admitting he is uncertain how many more majors he will be able to play.

Having suffered serious leg injuries in a car crash in 2021, Woods made a stirring return to competitive golf at last year's edition of the Masters.

Five-time champion Woods finished 47th at Augusta National Golf Club last year, making the cut before carding back-to-back 78s across the final two rounds.

While playing his first non-major PGA Tour event since 2020 at February's Genesis Invitational, Woods confirmed he planned to appear at all four majors this year – but the 47-year-old knows that aim is dependent on his fitness.

Asked if the possibility this could be his final major had crossed his mind, Woods told reporters: "Yeah, it has. Last year, I didn't know if I was going to play again at that time. 

"For some reason, everything came together, I pushed a bit and was able to make the cut, which was nice.

"I don't know how many more I have in me, so I just have to be able to appreciate the time I have here and cherish the memories. 

"So much of my life has been here at Augusta National. I'm just so excited to be able to come back here and play."

Woods ended an 11-year major title drought at the 2019 Masters, and while he is not being discussed as a leading contender this time around, he has not given up hope of a repeat performance.  

"Whether I'm a threat, who knows," Woods said. "People probably didn't think I was a threat in 2019 either, but that turned out okay!

"If there's any one golf course I can come back at like I did last year, it's here.

"I think my game is better than it was at this particular time last year. My endurance is better, but it aches a little more than it did last year.

"I just have to be conscious of how much I can push it. I can hit a lot of shots, but the difficulty for me is going to be walking, going forwards. That's how it is.

"It has been tough, and it will always be tough. It will never be the same, I understand that; it's one of the reasons why I can't prepare and play as many tournaments as I would like. That's my future, and I'm okay with that."

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