Li Haotong leads BMW International Open after second-round 67

By Sports Desk June 24, 2022

Li Haotong carded a second-round 67 to maintain his lead at the BMW International Open in Munich after a weather-interrupted second day.

The Chinese 26-year-old tied the Golfclub Munchen Eichenried course record with a score of 10 under par on Thursday, taking a one-shot lead into the clubhouse after two eagles in the final four holes.

Li will now also head into the third day in pole position, after overcoming two bogeys on the first seven holes to get himself to 15 under par.

He has not won a DP World Tour title since 2018, when he triumphed at the Omega Dubai Desert Classic, but now has a real chance of lifting the trophy after an impressive first two rounds.

"It's another good day in the office. I'm feeling great," Li told reporters. "I think I've only missed two cuts so far this year, so it's been working especially off the tee.

"For sure I'm already feeling the pressure. Hopefully I can play my golf and keep calm. To be honest I didn't drive as well as yesterday, but my short game is quite okay.

"When you get in the rough, the lie could be really bad or could be good. Sometimes you just need luck."

His closest challenger is Ryan Fox, who is just one shot behind after going around in 64 and is chasing a third DP World Tour win.

Play was suspended for around two hours because of the threat of lightning, and Fox brought the thunder when he stormed the back nine with four birdies. 

It was not enough to pip Li to the lead though heading into what promises to be an enthralling weekend.

Daan Huizing is just three shots off the lead, while Thomas Pieters' second round of 64 leaves him four back alongside Jordan Smith, with Maximilian Kieffer five shots off the leader.

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