The IAAF has announced sweeping changes to the Diamond League schedule in a move intended to boost its value to broadcasters.

In plans revealed on Wednesday, the revised programme for men and women does not feature the 200 metres, 3,000m steeplechase, discus or triple jump on its list of Diamond League official disciplines.

The world governing body carried out research ahead of the 2020 season and said the alterations were made to accommodate a 90-minute broadcast window.

Despite the 200m being cited as one of the most popular disciplines, that sprint event and the steeplechase will each only feature in 10 of the 14 regular meetings on the calendar – five times for men and five times for women – and will not have Diamond League status or feature in the Diamond League Final.

IAAF Diamond League chairman Sebastian Coe said: "Our objective is to create a faster paced, more exciting global league that will be the showcase for our sport. A league that broadcasters want to show and fans want to watch.

"However, we understand the disappointment of those athletes in the disciplines not part of the 2020 Diamond League season.

"We want to thank the 10 Diamond League meetings which have found a way to include the 200 metres or the 3,000-metre steeplechase, male and female, during the 2020 season and the four meetings hosting a discus throw competition or a triple jump competition."

Noah Lyles, who has won the men's 200m in each of the last three seasons, tweeted his apparent dismay at the decision, posting an image of cartoon character Lisa Simpson appearing surprised along with the words: "Wow no 200m".

Zurich will host the Diamond League Final in 2020 and 2021 as the series switches to a single-day format.

In the wake of qualifying for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan, on the weekend, Jamaican gymnast Danusia Francis has described 2019 as the best year of her professional life.

Nia Ali was crowned 100 metres hurdles champion, while Joshua Cheptegei and Timothy Cheruiyot struck gold on the track on the final day of the World Athletics Championships in Doha.

Ali ran a personal best 12.34 seconds to take the title ahead of fellow American Kendra Harrison, with Daniella Williams claiming silver for Jamaica on Sunday.

Uganda's world cross country champion Cheptegei stayed ahead of a strong field to win the 10,000m on the last evening of action in Qatar, while Kenyan Cheruiyot became the new 1500m champion.

There was long jump gold for German favourite Malaika Mihambo, who leaped a world-leading 7.30m, and Anderson Peters of Grenada became the first man from the Americas to be crowned world javelin champion.

The USA ended the competition with back-to-back 4x400m relay triumphs and finished top of the medal table with 29 – 14 of those being gold – ahead of Kenya, with 11 medals and five titles.

 

ALI INSPIRED BY OTHER MOTHERS

Olympic silver medallist Ali emulated Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Allyson Felix and Liu Hong in winning gold within a couple of years of giving birth.

Ali, who has a four-year-old son and a one-year-old daughter, took inspiration from seeing other athletes be successful at the highest level after becoming a mother.

The two-time world indoor champion said: "This is super special. I have never won an outdoor world title, I am ecstatic.

"Shelly-Ann, Allyson, all the ladies who have come back from child birth are an inspiration for me and I am so excited to be able to pull of the world title."

 

CHEPTEGEI AND CHERUIYOT GO ONE BETTER

Cheptegei and Cheruiyot had to settle for silver in London two years ago, but went one better on this occasion.

There was always going to be a new 10,000m champion after Mo Farah ended his track career and it was Cheptegei who came away from Yomif Kejelcha on the final lap to cross the line in 26:46.37 - the second-fastest time in World Championship history.

Cheruiyot was in front from the gun to take in the 1500m and burst away to finish two seconds clear of 2012 Olympic champion Taoufik Makhloufi.

 

MIHAMBO LEAPS INTO NEW GROUND

The strongly fancied Mihambo was down in seventh after the second round of the long jump final, but leapt into the lead with a third jump of 7.30m.

Only the great Jackie Joyner-Kersee has been beyond that distance at a World Championships and that jump put the 25-year-old German just a centimetre short of the all-time top 10 leaps.

Maryna Bekh-Romanchuk of Ukraine and Nigerian Ese Brume won silver and gold respectively. 

 

RELAY DOUBLE FOR USA

The USA ended another superb Championships on a high note with a relay double – the women coming home well clear of Poland and Jamaica taking bronze.

Jamaica had to settle for silver behind the USA's men's quartet, while the Belgium also got on the podium.

Lelisa Desisa became the first Ethiopian since 2001 to win the men's marathon at the World Athletics Championships with a tight victory in Doha.

Desisa, the 2013 silver medallist in Moscow, held off compatriot Mosinet Geremew by four seconds to claim the biggest gold of his career.

The 29-year-old, a winner of numerous World Marathon Majors, won in two hours, 10 minutes and 40 seconds, beating Geremew and Kenya's Amos Kipruto.

Desisa is the first Ethiopian man to win the marathon at the world championships since Gezahegne Abera in Edmonton 18 years ago.

"It was hot, but I prepared perfectly for this race," Lelisa said, via the IAAF, after the event, which started just before midnight local time.

"I am very tired, but after I took silver in Moscow, this time I kept my power better."

Brit Callum Hawkins again fell short of a medal, finishing fourth, just as he did in London two years ago.

Sifan Hassan completed an unprecedented double after winning 1500 metres gold, while Joe Kovacs was crowned shot put champion in a dramatic World Athletics Championships final in Doha on Saturday.

Hassan made history by becoming the first woman to win the 1500m and 10,000m titles in the same World Championships.

The Dutchwoman set a new championship record time of three minutes, 51.95 seconds on the penultimate day of competition in Qatar.

Kovacs won the shot put title by the barest of margins for the United States, while Hellen Obiri successfully defended her 5,000m crown in a championship record time of 14:26.72.

Venezuela's Yulimar Rojas also remained champion of the world in the triple jump on another thrilling night of action at Khalifa International Stadium.

 

DOUBLE DUTCH - HASSAN KICKS AWAY TO MAKE HISTORY

Hassan was not far off shattering the world record after surging away from her rivals in a rapid final a week after her 10,000m triumph.

The 26-year-old, whose coach Alberto Salazar was banned for four years after being found guilty of doping violations this week, attacked at the bell and there was no catching her as she kicked away for more glory.

Kenya's Olympic champion Faith Kipyegon took silver in a national record 3:54.22, two years after winning gold in London, with Gudaf Tsegay filling the podium for Ethiopia.

 

KOVACS WINS SHOT BY A CENTIMETRE

There was huge tension in the shot put final as American Kovacs produced the third longest throw of all time to edge out Ryan Crouser and Tomas Walsh to strike gold.

New Zealander Walsh threw a personal best 22.90m - a championship record for a short time - with his first throw to give himself a strong chance of retaining his title.

It was not to be for Walsh, though, as Kovacs recorded a mammoth 22.91 before Crouser fell agonising short with a personal best of his own of 22.90.

A series of no-throws from Walsh meant the USA took gold and silver in a hugely tense final.

 

OBIRI AND ROJAS STAY ON TOP OF THE WORLD

Kenya claimed gold and silver in the women's 5,000m final as Obiri shattered the championship record to retain her crown in 14:26.72.

Margaret Chelimo Kipkemboi ran a personal best 14:27.49 to take silver ahead of Germany's Konstanze Klosterhalfen

It was another day to remember for triple jump star Rojas, who remains the world champion following a leap of 15.37m. Jamaican Shanieka Ricketts and Caterine Ibarguen of Colombia secured silver and bronze respectively. 

 

JAMAICA AND USA TAKE RELAY GOLD

There was gold for Jamaica ahead of Great Britain and the USA in the women's 4x100m relay.

USA then struck gold in the men's 4x100m final, with Great Britain sealing another silver and Japan bronze.

Qatar's Mutaz Essa Barshim sent a raucous home crowd into raptures with a stunning gold in the men's high jump at the World Athletics Championships.

Empty stands often dogged the IAAF's showpiece event but the masses flocked to Doha's Khalifa International Stadium on Friday and Barshim did not disappoint, taking the title by clearing 2.37 metres on his first attempt.

It was a record-breaking evening for Dalilah Muhammad, who pipped her United States team-mate Sydney McLaughlin in a coruscating women's 400m hurdles final, although their compatriot Fred Kerley had to settle for bronze in the men 400m final as Steven Gardiner of the Bahamas claimed a stunning victory.

Conseslus Kipruto continued Kenyan dominance in the men's 3000m steeplechase by the barest of margins – pipping Ethiopia's Lamecha Girma on the line, while Yaime Perez and Denia Caballero made it a Cuba one-two in the women's discuss.

FROM INJURY WOE TO NATIONAL HERO - BARSHIM REVELS IN DOHA GLORY

World champion in 2017, Barshim only returned to action in June having spent almost a year on the sidelines following ankle surgery.

But he brought his best form to delight an adoring public and top the podium in a thrilling high-jump competition.

Barshim only erred at 2.33m, claiming a dramatic season's best at the third attempt, before sailing over 2.35m and 2.37m.

Neutral athletes Mikhail Akimenko and Ilya Ivanyuk could not do likewise and a remarkable comeback was complete.

MUHAMMAD BREAKS RECORD AGAIN

Muhammad stormed to her second world-record run of the season to claim gold in the 400m hurdles.

The Olympic champion broke Yuliya Pechonkina's record, which stood for almost 16 years, when she won at the US Track and Field Championships in July, clocking 52.20 seconds.

She became the first track athlete to set an all-time best in an individual race at the championship in Doha on Friday, clocking a blistering 52.16 secs.

As expected, Muhammad was pushed all the way by McLaughlin, whose brilliant personal best of 52.23 made her the second-fastest woman in the history of the event – having chased relentlessly from a draw two lanes inside the world champion.

Jamaica's Rushell Clayton took the bronze.

GARDINER CUTS DOWN ALL-STAR FIELD

Michael Norman's shock semi-final elimination left fellow American Kerley as the favourite for men's 400m gold but Gardiner had other ideas as he sensationally streaked clear of the field to clock 43.48 – placing him sixth on the all-time list.

Kerley managed to hold on to third as he faded in the home straight, with Anthony Jose Zambrano of Colombia claiming silver.

Former Olympic and world champion Kirani James came in fifth following his inspirational return from Graves disease, but Gardiner's gold crowned a similar story of human triumph – fundraising efforts having helped to make it possible for a Bahaman team to attend the World Championships following the devastating impact of Hurricane Dorian upon the Caribbean island.

Gardiner's victory by more than half a second stood in stark contrast to the conclusion of the steeplechase, where Olympic champion Kipruto ran down Girma off the final barrier to make it back-to-back world titles by 0.01 seconds.

The Ethiopian had the consolation of setting a new national record, with Morocco's Soufiane El Bakkali left behind to collect bronze.

CUBAN REVOLUTIONS DETHRONE PERKOVIC AS RELAY STARS SET THE STAGE

Croatia's Sandra Perkovic will know how Kipruto and Barshim feel, having retained her world title in London two years ago.

She could not make it three in a row as Perez came out on top in a ding-dong battle with Caballero – a fifth-round 69.17m seeing off her team-mate.

Defending champions Great Britain qualified fastest for the men's 4x100m relay final, with the United States just edging through despite an error-strewn run. Jamaica and Canada were not so lucky.

Jamaica, Britain, China and USA look set to vie for the medals in a strong women's field, although Germany – the fastest team in the world this year – failed to make the cut.

Favourite Timothy Cheruiyot won his 1500m semi-final in a time of 3:36.53.

Niklas Kaul made history in the decathlon at the World Athletics Championships, while Salwa Eid Naser produced a sensational performance to win the women's 400 metres.

German 21-year-old Kaul took advantage of the injury-enforced withdrawal of world-record holder Kevin Mayer with just two disciplines remaining to become the youngest winner of the decathlon title.

Naser surged to glory in the 400m with the third-fastest time in history, stopping the clock at 48.14 seconds.

Katarina Johnson-Thompson produced four personal bests in heptathlon events to dethrone Nafissatou Thiam, who finished 304 points adrift in second – the biggest margin of victory in 32 years.

Gong Lijiao retained her shotput gold with 19.55m on her fourth attempt not beaten.

 

NIKLAS A KAUL CUSTOMER

Kaul was down in sixth after the pole vault, 275 points adrift of leader Pierce LePage.

With Mayer pulling out during the pole vault due to an Achilles problem, the German launched himself into contention with an astonishing 79.05m in the javelin – the longest throw of any decathlete in World Championships history – although Maicel Uibo led the way from Damian Warner.

Kaul then finished the 1500m first in a time of 4:15.70 to take the title with a personal best of 8,691 points, with Uibo holding off Warner for the silver.

 

JOHNSON-THOMPSON TRIUMPHS

Johnson-Thompson finished Wednesday with a 96-point lead over Thiam and she increased that to triple figures with an impressive leap of 6.77m in the long jump in Thursday's first heptathlon event.

Thiam closed the gap with a season's best in the javelin, but the Briton produced a personal best of 43.93m to limit the damage.

Johnson-Thompson clinched the gold medal with an 800m time of two minutes, 07.26 seconds – another personal best – leaving 2017 champion Thiam to take silver and Verena Preiner with the bronze.

 

MILLER-UIBO STUCK WITH SILVER

Having decided not to compete in the 200m and focus solely on the 400m, Olympic champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo was the favourite for gold in Doha.

Naser performed brilliantly on the second bend and, although Miller-Uibo was able to close the gap on the home straight, the Bahraini finished in the fastest time in over 30 years.

Shericka Jackson claimed the bronze after a personal best of 49.47s – 1.10 behind Miller-Uibo.

 

A RETROSPECTIVE BRONZE

Spanish sprint hurdler Orlando Ortega was handed a dramatic bronze medal reprieve a day after a falling rival ruined his final.

The Cuba-born athlete, who took silver in the 110 metres hurdles at the 2016 Olympics, was in contention for a top-three finish on Wednesday when Jamaican Omar McLeod, racing in the lane to his left, began to hit hurdles and crashed to the deck.

A fourth-placed finish was the best the 28-year-old could manage in the circumstances, but the IAAF took a sympathetic view and awarded a second bronze to Ortega.

Spanish sprint hurdler Orlando Ortega was handed a dramatic bronze medal reprieve at the World Athletics Championships - a day after a falling rival ruined his race in the Doha final.

The Cuba-born athlete, who took silver in the 110 metres hurdles at the 2016 Olympics, was in contention for a top-three finish on Wednesday when Jamaican Omar McLeod, racing in the lane to his left, began to hit hurdles and crashed to the deck.

Defending world champion and Olympic gold medallist McLeod came tumbling across Ortega's path, clearly impeding him and forcing the exasperated 28-year-old to have to settle for fourth place.

Given his momentum was clearly slowed by the disruption - Ortega even had to palm away the out-of-control McLeod - the IAAF, athletics' world governing body, took a sympathetic view.

Following an appeal from Spain, the IAAF announced it would preserve the 1-2-3 from the race, which was won by American Grant Holloway, ahead of Sergey Shubenkov and Pascal Martinot-Lagarde, but award a second bronze to Ortega.

"Following a protest from the Spanish team, the jury of appeal decided that Orlando Ortega - who was obstructed by a fall from defending champion Omar McLeod - would also receive a bronze medal," the IAAF stated in an updated race report.

McLeod was disqualified from the race after his fall, punishment for having stumbled out of his lane.

Dina Asher-Smith did not shrink under the pressure as she clinched gold in the 200m at the World Athletics Championships.

The Briton was the heavy favourite in a race missing the likes of Elaine Thompson, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Dafne Schippers.

She justified her status in emphatic fashion, becoming Great Britain's first female sprint world champion.

There was drama in the men's 110m hurdles final, won by Grant Holloway of the United States, while Pawel Fajdek prevailed for Poland in the men's hammer throw.

 

DINA DELIVERS

The expectation was not too much for Asher-Smith, who eased to a dominant victory in the 200m final to add gold to the silver she claimed behind Fraser-Pryce in the 100.

Asher-Smith ran a personal best and a national record of 21.88 seconds, finishing well clear of Brittany Brown (22.22) with her performance owing in part to a lightning fast start.

Victory never looked in doubt after she surged out of the blocks and the Briton was unable to keep her emotions in check as the magnitude of her achievement hit home.

"I just don't know what to say, I don't know if it's properly sunk in," she told BBC Sport. "It's been a long championships, I'm tired. It means so much."

Switzerland's Mujinga Kambundji (22.51) edged out Anglerne Annelus (22.59) for bronze.


MCLEOD HAMSTRUNG IN TITLE DEFENCE

Omar McLeod's defence of his 110m hurdles title ended in nightmarish circumstances.

The Jamaican was neck and neck with Grant Holloway for much of the race but clipped the third-last hurdle, setting in motion a series of stumbles that saw him fall to the ground after clattering into the final obstacle.

Holloway, the youngest man in the field at 21, triumphed ahead of neutral athlete Sergey Shubenkov and France's Pascal Martinot-Lagarde, with McLeod left to rue an apparent hamstring injury.

"I was not getting pop because of the hamstring," McLeod told BBC Sport. "There's nothing to take away, I gave it my all, that's just how it is."

FIT-AGAIN JAMES STORMS INTO FINAL

Kirani James is on course to complete a remarkable comeback after qualifying second-fastest for the men's 400m final.

James - the Olympic champion in 2012 and runner-up in Rio three years ago - was diagnosed in 2017 with Graves' Disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes an overactive thyroid.

The Grenadian has barely raced in the past three seasons, but he looked in superb form as he posted a time of 44.23 on Wednesday, which was beaten only by Steven Gardiner.

The women's 400m hurdles semis were dominated by American athletes.

Olympic champion Dalilah Muhammad qualifed easily but her time of 53.91 seconds was bettered by Sydney McLaughlin, who cruised through in 53.81.

Jamaica World and Olympic champion Omar McLeod was the fastest qualifier headed into the men’s 110m hurdles finals as three other Jamaican athletes crashed out of contention.

Qualifying from Heat 2, McLeod looked in full control despite clipping a few hurdles early on and finished with a time of 13.08.  Fast-closing Frenchman Pascal Martinot-Lagarde was second in a season’s best 13.08 with China’s Wenjun Xie third in 13.22.

A duo of Jamaican athletes Orlando Bennett and Ronald Levy of competed in heat1 but finished 7th and 8th respectively. 

The region’s other representative Andrew Riley competed in Heat 3 but never managed to get into the race after finishing fifth in 13.57.  The event was won by Spain’s Orlando Ortega who qualified in 13.16, with Cyprus’ 13.29 with Antonio Alkana of South Africa finishing third in 13.47.  China’s Wenju Xie (13.22) and Devon Allen of the United States (13.36).    

Noah Lyles has vowed to beat the times of sprint legend Usain Bolt, but the American was below his best when capturing the 200 metres title at the World Athletics Championships.

Lyles was unconvincing in claiming gold in Doha, needing a late surge to justify his status as the clear favourite.

His compatriot Donavan Brazier produced a stunning performance to win the 800m, while Britain's Dina Asher-Smith will go into the women's 200m final as the athlete to beat after she laid down a big marker in the semi-finals.

The field events, meanwhile, produced no shortage of drama.

 

LYLES LEAVES IT LATE

Lyles was expected to take gold in the 200m but few would have predicted the manner of his victory.

The American was behind going into the straight as Britain's Adam Gemili led after a great start and an excellent bend.

However, Lyles turned on the jets in the final 100m and edged to victory in 19.83 seconds. Canadian Andre De Grasse added to his Olympic silver by coming home in second, ahead of training partner Alex Quinonez of Ecuador.

A devastated Gemili was fourth, again narrowly missing out on a major individual medal after finishing in the same position at the Olympics three years ago.

BRAZIER BREAKS RECORDS

Brazier's victory could hardly have looked more dominant as he burst clear with 300m to go, and his 800m championship record of 1:42:34 also set a US record.

Amel Tuka of Bosnia-Herzegovina was over a second behind in silver, with Ferguson Cheruiyot Rotich taking bronze for Kenya.

"I really had to dig deep for that one," Brazier told BBC Sport. "Little bit of a target on my back now [ahead of the Olympics]. I'd rather have it than not have it."


DINA LAYS DOWN MARKER

With Olympic champion Elaine Thompson, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Marie-Josee Ta Lou and 2017 world champion Dafne Schippers all having pulled out of the 200m, Asher-Smith is the clear favourite.

The European champion was a class above in her semi-final and the fastest qualifier for the final as she won in 22.16 seconds.

With Brittany Brown the next fastest qualifier in 22.46 seconds, it will take a significant tunaround to deny the 100m silver medallist the 200m title.

KENDRICKS DENIES DUPLANTIS

The men's pole vault final proved a thriller as Sam Kendricks successfully defended his title, becoming the first man since Sergey Bubka to win multiple world championship golds in the discipline.

Kendricks was run extremely close by Swedish teenager Armand Duplantis. Both men cleared 5.97 metres on the final attempt but neither could manage 6.02m.

That meant Kendricks retained the title on countback, courtesy of clearing 5.92 with his first attempt, though Duplantis did not seem disappointed with silver. He and Kendricks, along with bronze medallist Piotr Lisek, backflipped on to the mat after the result was decided.

Meanwhile, in the women's javelin, Australia's Kelsey Lee-Barber took gold with her final attempt, a throw of 66.56m, denying Liu Shiying and Lyu Huihui a Chinese one-two.

Karsten Warholm retained his men's 400 metres hurdles title on what proved to be a good day for defending champions at the World Athletics Championships.

Norwegian Warholm rounded out Monday's schedule in Doha by holding off American Rai Benjamin to triumph in a time of 47.42 seconds.

Muktar Edris also made it back-to-back world golds in the men's 5,000m, while Mariya Lasitskene went one better in the women's high jump, triumphing for an unprecedented third straight time.

There was a surprise in the women's 800m, however, as Uganda's Halimah Nakaayi prevailed - with pre-race favourite Ajee Wilson having to settle for bronze - while Daniel Stahl claimed gold in the men's discus.

As for the 200m, a number of high-profile names pulled out of the women's event but men's favourite Noah Lyles had no issues in progressing to the final.

 

THIS MEANS WAR!

While the time was not fast enough to threaten Kevin Young's long-standing world record of 46.78s, a mark set way back in 1992, Warholm still produced an impressive performance to reign again at the end of a long season.

The 23-year-old set the pace in the early going and remained clear of the field, with Benjamin unable to reel him in during the closing metres. Qatar's Abderrahman Samba rounded out the podium places

"I actually felt my heart was going to stop. I thought I was going to die... but it's going to be worth it!" Warholm told BBC Sport in his post-race interview.

"Here I am - world champion. And I'm not dead either!"


HAT-TRICK HERO

Lasitskene created history as she once again ruled, in the process becoming the first athlete to win three successive world high jump titles.

The Russian, competing as an Authorised Neutral Athlete, wrapped up gold with a clearance of 2.04m at the first attempt, though she failed in an effort to set a new personal best at 2.08m.

Yaroslava Mahuchikh of Ukraine also made it over 2.04m at the third time of asking, the 18-year-old setting a world junior record as she claimed the silver medal.


DINA DAZZLES - LYLES ON TRACK

After a silver medal in the 100m on Sunday, Dina Asher-Smith set the fastest time in her heat in the women's 200m.

The British runner will have high hopes of claiming a gold after a number of leading contenders opted not to run at the distance, including Dutch defending champion Dafne Schippers.

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica - who won gold in the 100m - was another leading name to withdraw, while Blessing Okagbare was disqualified after running out of her lane.

Lyles, meanwhile, laid down a marker by posting a time of 19.86s in the men's 200m. The American had silver hair for his heats on the previous day but will be out for gold in Tuesday's final. Ecuador's Alex Quinonez could be his main rival after impressing with a time of 19.95s.

Allyson Felix became the most decorated athlete in IAAF World Championships history as she helped the United States to victory in the mixed-gender 4x400m relay.

Felix was level with Usain Bolt on 11 gold medals at the event prior to Saturday's race in Doha.

But the 33-year-old, who became a mother in November, helped set up Michael Cherry to power clear on the last leg.

Poland - who decided to send their two men out first in an attempt to build up an unassailable lead - held the advantage until Cherry came into play, with Felix having run second.

Cherry simply had too much for the rest of the field, with Javon Francis claiming silver for Jamaica and Bahrain coming in third.

Christian Coleman revelled in being crowned the world 100 metres champion after sealing gold in Saturday's final in Doha.

The 23-year-old lit up the World Athletics Championships by recording the sixth fastest time in history, clocking an impressive 9.76seconds.

That effort saw him topple fellow American Justin Gatlin, who stood on top of the podium ahead of Coleman two years ago in London.

"World champion, it sounds incredible, too good to be true," said Coleman, who saw a case against him for reportedly missing three doping tests dropped by the United States Anti-Doping Agency earlier this month.

"For me to make it here and come out with a gold is incredible. I was just out of college two years ago and not many people expected me to win a silver. I expected to come out here and be great and upgrade my silver medal."

With the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo drawing ever closer, Coleman admitted he had allowed his mind to wander to thoughts of competing in Japan next year.

"It's hard to compartmentalise and not think about Tokyo – that's huge to go to an Olympics," he said.

"I will be expected to go there and medal but the work doesn't stop. Hopefully I can make the team."

At the age of 37, there are questions over whether this was Gatlin's last appearance on the global stage.

But, having run a time of 9.89secs to claim silver, the divisive sprint veteran was proud of his effort and revealed his plans to join Coleman in Tokyo.

"This season was a testament to my endurance and will," he said. "I had setbacks this season. I just wanted to stay focused on this race and give it all I got for this season.

"Christian has ran a spectacular season, great times. I couldn't say it was a shock that he would do a great job here. I had to hold on and stay strong in my technique."

Asked if he will be at the Olympics next year, he replied: "I'm coming. I'm going to be better. I'm ready."

Christian Coleman took World Athletics Championships gold in the men's 100 metres final with the sixth quickest time in history.

The American clocked 9.76seconds to get revenge on compatriot Justin Gatlin after finishing second to his rival in London two years ago.

Gatlin ran 9.89seconds, while Andre De Grasse was third in 9.90secs, but once again the action was played out against the backdrop of a largely empty stadium in Doha.

There were three other finals before the blue-riband event, with winners crowned in the women's hammer throw and 10,000m, and the men's long jump.

COOL COLEMAN IS DOHA'S SPRINT KING

Coleman went into Saturday's final as the clear favourite to win and never looked in danger of suffering an upset loss.

Quick out of the blocks and leading from the off, the 23-year-old set a world-leading time to secure the biggest win of his career.

His closest competition came from the divisive Gatlin who, at the age of 37, took silver as he surrendered his world title.

The top five – completed by Akani Simbine and Yohan Blake – all ran under 10 seconds.

 

GAYLE SEALS LONG JUMP TRIUMPH

Tajay Gayle's leap of 8.69m won him gold in the men's long jump, a full 30cm ahead of Jeff Henderson.

The Jamaican, who only narrowly qualified for the final, set a world-leading distance with his fourth attempt, which proved to be his last.

Olympic champion Henderson could only register 8.17m with his final effort, leaving him to settle for silver with a best jump of 8.39m.

Cuba's Juan Miguel Echevarria was third after posting a distance of 8.34m.

Dutchwoman Sifan Hassan prevailed in the 10,000m, with Ethiopia's Letesenbet Gidey and Kenya's Agnes Jebet Tirop rounding off the podium.

DeAnna Price sealed another gold for the USA in the women's hammer throw, with Joanna Fiodorow taking silver for Poland and Wang Zheng adding a bronze to China's medal tally.

USA CLAIM WORLD RECORD

The first world record of this championships went to America's mixed 4x400m relay team.

Tyrell Richard, Jessica Beard, Jasmine Blocker and Obi Igbokwe combined to run 3:12.42 on the event's maiden outing at this competition.

Jamaica came a close second, with Bahrain third.

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