Shaunae-Miller-Uibo has called foul on the decision to dismiss charges against Salwa Eid Nasser and has called for the formation of an independent athletes’ body in a bid to maintain the integrity of the sport.

Elaine Thompson-Herah and Shaunae Miller-Uibo ended their respective seasons with the number-one rankings in the 100m and 200m, respectively in what was a track season like no other.

The 2019/2020 track season was characterized by meet cancellations and the introduction of virtual formats because the pandemic that has been sweeping the globe since March. However, meets gradually returned largely before empty stadia but many athletes still managed to deliver world-class performances.

Among them was the 2016 double Olympic champion who was fastest in the world over 100m for 2020.

Thompson Herah’s 10.85 set in Rome on September 17 beat out her compatriot and rival Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, who ended her year ranked second by virtue of the 10.86s run at the Velocity Fest meeting in Kingston’s National Stadium on August 22.

Rising star Sha’ Carri Richardson, in her first full season as a professional, was third fastest with 10.95.

The Bahamian sprint queen was equally impressive in the year in which she set a personal best of 10.98s in the 100m and the world’s best time of 21.98 in the 200m at the Back to the Track Meeting in Clermont, Florida on July 25.

Richardson capped her great year with a personal best 22.00 that was the second fastest for 2020 while Thompson Herah’s 22.19 ranked her third in the world for the year.

Miller-Uibo, who last year set 48.37 the sixth fastest time in history over the 400m was only second best for 2020 with 50.52 set in Monteverde, Florida on July 4. That time was only bettered by Lynna Irby’s 50.50, the fastest time in the world this year.

Lieke Klaver of the Netherlands clocked 50.98, which made her third best in the world for the year.

Coach Lance Brauman has allayed fears over the health of Shaunae Miller-Uibo after the 2019 World Championships 400m silver medallist failed to finish her 200m race at the Drake Blue Oval Showcase on Saturday.

Miller, who has season-best times of 10.98 and 21.98 over the 100 and 200m, respectively, was a heavy favourite to win the half-lap sprint. However, she pulled up during the second of two heats won by the USA’s Lynna Irby in 22.52.

Coach Brauman, however, said the athlete felt some tightness, “nothing major,” he said.

Miller-Uibo, the 2016 Olympic 400m champion, had been unbeaten over the 200m for the past two seasons during which she ran a personal best 21.74 run in Zurich on August 29, 2019. Her only loss over the 400m came in October last year at the 2019 World Championships in Doha where she ran a personal best 48.37 only to lose to Bahrain’s Salwa Eid Nasser who ran 48.14, the third-fastest time in history.

Megan Tapper clocked a season-best time in the 100m hurdles on Saturday at the Drake Blue Oval Showcase where Bahamian star Shaunae Miller-Uibo failed to finish the 200m won the USA’s Lynna Irby.

Tapper, running in the second of two heats, clocked 12.96 while finishing behind Tiffany Porter, who also had a season-best 12.90 to win the heat. Meanwhile, heat-one winner Payton Chadwick was third overall with her time of 12.97s.

The 26-year-old Jamaican was elated at the time.

“Finally! A race to call home about,” she posted on Instagram. “The last one was definitely the best one.”

Heading into the meet, many would have been looking forward to Miller-Uibo’s run in the 200m. Unbeaten over the 200m for the past two seasons, the towering Bahamian sprinter boasts season-best times of 10.98 and 21.98 over the 100m and 200m, respectively, set in Clermont in July.

However, any chance of her going faster was dashed when she failed to complete the second of two 200m heats. Winner of the heat, the USA’s Lynna Irby, crossed the line first and was the overall winner in 22.52.

Her compatriot Kyra Jefferson, finished second in 22.69, a time good enough for second overall. Miller-Uibo’s compatriot, Tynia Gaither, finished third in the heat in 23.08, however, her time saw her finish fourth overall behind the USA’s Shakima Wimbley, who won the opening heat in 23.07.

In the men’s 200m Panama’s Alonso Edward clocked 20.69 but was beaten into second place by the USA’s Justin Robinson who clocked 20.67. However, the outright winner was Josephus Lyles who stopped the clock in 20.32 to win the first of the two heats.

His time meant Edwards finished third overall.

Bahamian superstar, Olympic gold-medalist Shaunae Miller-Uibo will be among the headliners at the Drake Blue Oval Showcase at Drake Stadium in California on Saturday.

An estimated 80 world-class track and field athletes including Tianna Bartoletta are set to compete in 11 events before empty seats inside the stadium.

Miller, who ran a personal best 10.98 in the 100m this season will compete in the 200m at the meet that will also have World Championships silver medallist Brittany Brown on show along with the likes of 400m hurdler Shamier Little as well as Shakima Wimbley.

Also among the stars down to compete are Jarrion Lawson, Devon Allen, Aleec Harris and veteran Wallace Spearmon. Allen and Harris will face off in the 110m hurdles.

Bahamian quarter-miler Shaunae Miller-Uibo pulled out of Monday’s Star Athletic Sprint Showcase out of an ‘abundance of caution’ and not a major injury, the athlete’s manager Claude Bryan has revealed.

The 26-year-old Nassau native has had a strong season to date.  She posted a then 100m world-leading 10.98, before returning to post 21.98 the next day, over double the distance, at the USA’s Back to the Track meet, three weeks ago.  The times saw the sprinter join elite company, with just four women who have run sub-11s in the 100m, sub-22s in the 200m, and sub-49s in the 400.

On Monday, however, the athlete did not present in that kind of form and crossed the finish line, in the preliminaries, in fourth place, with a sub-par 13.56 seconds.  Sha’Carri Richardson clocked the fastest qualifying time of 10.95.

Miller-Uibo did not show up for the final, which was won by Richardson in 10.83. Her absence prompted fear the athlete may have sustained an injury.  Miller-Uibo’s manager Claude Bryan, however, revealed it was “just a mild discomfort so she opted for caution.”

He further confirmed that the athlete would not be looking to shut down the season, without finishing up as scheduled.

“We’re looking for other low-key opportunities for her to wrap up the season.”

With her 10.98/21.98 sprint double at the Back to the Track: Clermont meeting in Florida, Shaunae Miller-Uibo was the toast of the track and field world last weekend.

When Shaunae Miller-Uibo completed her fantastic sprint double at the Back to the Track: Clermont track meet on the weekend, she moved up the ranks in an elite class of athlete – the combined sprinter.

Olympic 400-metre champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo, who is likely to just run the 200 metres in Tokyo next year, has sent a strong message to her opponents after a sub-11-second clocking at the Back to the Track meet in Claremont on Friday.

Miller-Uibo, who has tried in vain to have the 400 and 200 metres spread out at the Tokyo Olympics in 2021, will likely be running just the half-lap event and not defending her title.

She went a long way on Friday to show she was getting faster, clocking 10.98 to smash her personal best twice after first easing to 11.03 in the heats.

The time puts Miller-Uibo in rarified air, the tall Bahamian now just one of four women to ever run sub-11 over 100 metres, sub-22 over 200, and sub-49 over 400.

Miller-Uibo got the better of 17-year-old United States athlete Tamari Davis, who clocked 11.15 seconds, and Jamaica’s Natalliah White, 11.19.

Several Caribbean athletes including Olympic champions Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Shaunae Miller-Uibo will comprise a 24-member board of the now formally established The Athletics Association (TAA) that will look out for the best interests of track and field athletes across the globe.

The AA was formed in response to the calls from athletes worldwide for independent representation. “The objective of The Athletics Association is to provide Track and Field athletes with a meaningful voice, to fight for stronger athletes’ rights, and to seek an athletes-first approach to our sport,” the association said in a statement released today.

The Athletics Association aims to engage in positive dialogue with the sport’s governing body, World Athletics, and their own athletes’ commission, but will, of course, hold World Athletics to account when necessary and challenge them if they are not acting in the best interest of the athletes.

Fraser-Pryce, who last year, won an unprecedented fourth World 100m title in Doha, Qatar, sits on the board representing the sprints while Miller-Uibo, the 2016 Olympic 400m champion and 2019 400m silver medallist, represents the Americas alongside Mikel Thomas from Trinidad and Tobago.

Four-time World triple jump champion Christian Taylor is the association’s president and steeplechaser Emma Coburn is the vice president.

According to the association’s statement, they have been busy developing a number of support services and member benefits for athletes, including a hardship grant fund, training courses, and discounts on products.

Details of the full annual membership package will be announced ahead of the full roll-out in January 2021.

Chief among their initial goals, TAA said, is the intention to lobby World Athletics and the Diamond League stakeholders regarding the changes to the Diamond League schedule that were announced for 2020. Those changes included removing the 200m, triple jump and discus from the Diamond League circuit relegating those events to a newly formed Continental Series.

“We will offer suggestions and alternatives that would include all stadium disciplines, and would benefit athletes and fans, as well as the long term interests of this diverse and wonderful sport,” the statement said.

They also want to gain a seat at the table with World Athletics to command real involvement and power when it comes to decision-making in the sport, as they look to amplify the voices of its members and athletes all over the world.

They also plan to announce an Athletics Association’s welfare charter, highlighting their commitment to improving the conditions for athletes across a range of issues as well as solidify a membership package that will begin in January 2021 and will offer access to courses on issues such as financial literacy and life after athletics, and also discounts on products.

Critically, they also plan to present World Athletics with innovative ideas for the growth of the sport.

 “I am very proud of the progress made by the members of the Athletics Association Board. Since its initial inception, a lot of work has been put in to establish the right governance and long-term viability that is essential to do justice to the athletes we represent. It’s this that has attracted the commitment and support of the athletes on the Board. We have athletes from every continent, and a wide variety of disciplines; we are made up of Olympic and World champions, as well as world record holders and continental champions, “ said AA President Taylor.

 “In addition to the board members, there are so many other athletes who have helped get us to this stage. World Athletics recently published a strategic plan, and athletes have been identified as key stakeholders. The Athletics Association provides a representative voice and a simple way for the sport’s governing body to follow through on their commitment. We are ready to contribute to the growth of the sport that we love, ensuring that athletes are part of the decision-making process.  This association is for the athletes, by the athletes, and we are determined to make a real difference. We firmly believe that we can affect positive change in our sport. We are ready for the challenge.”

The Athletics Association has also agreed to a strategic partnership with Global Athlete, a progressive athlete start-up movement aiming to inspire greater athlete representation in organisations across the world of sport. The partnership brings together two organisations with similar values to collaborate on projects, share insights and drive change that will ultimately benefit the athletes and the sport.

“Global Athlete is proud to be a partner with the Athletics Association. Establishing an independent association is a critical step in enhancing athletes’ rights. It is so important for athletes to have their own representation” said Rob Koehler, Global Athlete Director-General.

 “The sport of athletics needs to find a new and exciting path for success. This success can only be possible with real meaningful athlete engagement. Athletes have the desire to further grow the sport while at the same time ensuring the utmost care is given to athletes’ rights. Together we are stronger.” said Emma Coburn, The Athletics Association Vice-President.

 The Athletics Association Board is made up of representatives from every continent and comprises 24 athletes, including individual global champions: Christian Taylor (President) Emma Coburn (Vice-President), Allyson Felix, Ashton Eaton, Julius Yego, Katarina Johnson-Thompson, Shaunae Miller-Uibo, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Tianna Bartoletta and Tom Walsh.

 

Citing the perceived reluctance of the Olympic organisers to adjust the schedule at next summer’s Games, 2016 Olympic 400m champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo is mulling stepping down to the 200m for Tokyo 2021.

The 26-year-old Bahamian has been the best 200/400m sprinter in the world over the past two seasons, has requested an adjustment to the schedule that would allow her to attempt the double, something they have done to accommodate Americans Michael Johnson and Allyson Felix as well as French track icon Marie Jose Perec.

However, to date, the Bahamian and her Olympic committee have heard nothing to suggest that the IOC will honour her request.

“We have made an appeal to have the schedule changed. We’ve not received a positive response as yet, but we remain hopeful that they would take another look at it because it means so much to us and it means so much to Shaunae Miller-Uibo,” said Bahamas Olympic Committee President Romell Knowles while speaking with the Bahamas Guardian.

“To come from such a small island and to get an opportunity to be among the best in the world in both the 200 and 400 meters is just phenomenal. The precedence has already been set and we would just like to be given that opportunity. It means so much to a little country like ours that has produced such great athletes.”

Meanwhile, Miller-Uibo, for now, seems resigned to the possibility that she will have to drop one of her events.

 “As it is now, the schedule isn’t set up for me to do two events, so I would have to choose one event and we’re leaning more toward the 200 meters seeing that we already have the 400 meters title,” Miller-Uibo told the Bahamas Guardian.

“We wanted to do both – I wanted to go after the 200 metres title and also wanted to defend my 400 meters title, but the way the schedule is set up, it would be difficult to do both. It’s been that way for a few years now. When they didn’t change the schedule, we had to make some decisions and right now, we’re leaning toward the 200. Nothing is finalized as yet, but that’s the way it is right now.”

Only three athletes have ever won the 200/400m double at the Olympic Games – Johnson and Perec and Valerie Brisco-Hooks.

On October 3, 2019, eight of the world’s best female runners lined up for the final of the Women 400m final at the World Championships in Doha, Qatar.

Among the eight were Jamaica’s Shericka Jackson, Bahamian Shaunae Miller-Uibo and an exciting young talent Salwa Eid Naser of Bahrain. Also among the finalists were 2017 champion Phyllis Francis, Wadeline Jonathas of the USA, Stephenie-Ann McPherson of Jamaica, and the Polish pair of Justyna Święty-Ersetic and Iga Baumgart-Witan.

They were about to be role players in what was one of the greatest races of the championships and one of the fastest of all time.

About 15 months earlier – July 20, 2018 - about 6000 km away in Monaco, Naser and Miller-Uibo had set the stage for their much-anticipated clash in Doha.

In a stirring battle inside the Stade Louis II, the Bahamian running in lane 6 was pushed to a personal best 48.97 by the young Bahranian - running in lane 5 - who also delivered a lifetime best of 49.08s, clearly demonstrating that she was getting a lot closer to getting a leg up on the towering Bahamian star.

It was the only loss Naser suffered over 400m in 2018.

Fast-forward to October 3, 2019, when Naser is one again in lane 5. This time, however, Miller-Uibo is running in lane 7. Jackson is in lane 3.

People across the globe were expecting something special. Many, including me, smelled a possible upset. Naser had looked strong coming into the final, I daresay as good as Miller-Uibo, the favourite.

The only question in my mind was whether the two 400m legs Naser ran to help Bahrain to the bronze medal in the mixed relays a few days earlier had sapped whatever energy she had left in those powerful legs of hers.

When the gun went, it was immediately clear that Naser was going to be a real threat. She powered down the backstretch steadily closing the gap until she was on the Bahamian’s shoulder with just over 100 metres to go.

Naser then slung off the curve into a three-metre lead over Miller-Uibo and held her immaculate form to cross the line in 48.14 and the claim the gold medal.

The 48.14 was a world-leading time, an area record, a personal best and the third-fastest time in history. Only East Germany’s Marita Koch 47.60 and Czechoslovakia’s Jarmila Kratochvílová 47.99 have run faster.

Like the rest of us who witnessed it, Miller-Uibo, who had just run the sixth-fastest time in history (48.34), sat stunned at what had just transpired.

For weeks, the race was the topic of many conversations as we discussed whether the 35-year-old world record was under legitimate threat.

So imagine my dismay when last week Google alerts brought my attention to the fact that Naser had been provisionally suspended under Article 2.4 of the WADA Code.

Whereabouts violations make little sense to me.

The World Anti-Doping Agency requires that athletes fill out a form online that says where they will be for an hour each day. This allows doping control officers to locate and conduct out-of-competition tests on an athlete.

If an athlete misses three tests in a 12-month period, it is tantamount to a doping violation and the athlete, if found culpable can be banned for up to two years. Mind you, it does not mean an athlete has been doping but it also does not mean they have not.

However, it is the duty of the athlete to ensure that the update their whereabouts. It is not that hard. In this age of smartphones, an athlete can update his or her information on the fly because, in reality, things can change in a hurry.

In recent times, a number of Caribbean athletes have run about of this code. Jamaican cricketer Andre Russell and Trinidad and Tobago’s Michelle-Lee Ahye have been suspended for missing tests.

Track and field athletes know how important it is for them to uphold the integrity of their sport. The flood of doping cases over the past few decades have served to badly taint the sport that it is hard to trust performances because you never truly know.

It has got so bad that even Usain Bolt’s times have been called into question even though he has never failed a dope test in his outstanding career.

So, it is shocking to me that an athlete could manage to miss three Tests in a year. In the case of Naser, it was four, according to the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU), who also claim that Naser’s third missed test was under investigation while she was powering her way to victory in Doha.

What is even more disappointing is that the gravity of the situation seems to be lost on the young woman.

“It can happen to anybody. I don’t want people to get confused in all this because I would never cheat,” she said.

“Hopefully, it will get resolved because I really don’t like the image. It’s going to be fine. It’s very hard to have this little stain on my name.”

Her comments are shocking to me.

“It can happen to anybody”? It should not be happening. The life of the sport depends on athletes upholding their end of the bargain. Athletics has fallen steadily down the pecking order and is struggling to attract sponsors and it is because of things like this.

In addition, no, it is not going to be fine because now like so many other outstanding athletic performances, there is now a huge cloud of suspicion over that amazing time and incredible race, a cloud that will remain forever over it no matter the outcome of the AIU investigation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wonderful female athletes from the Caribbean can be found all over, however, today we will seek to come up with the BestXI of them.

The sports desk at SportsMax.tv can never agree on anything, but today we managed to come up with an XI that while not in order of the most significant, provides a list of women, who have given sport in the region, some of its greatest moments. Just like we could not agree on some of the names that should be included or excluded, we are sure you guys have different opinions on this list. Write your list or your comments in any of the comments sections on our social media pages. Twitter (@SportsMax_Carib), Instagram (sportsmax_tv), and Facebook (@SportsMax).

 

BestXI

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (Jamaica)

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is a legend of women’s sprinting, becoming the first woman to win four gold medals over the course of four World Championships. She was also the first Caribbean woman to win 100-metre gold at the Olympics when she claimed the title in Beijing, China in 2008. Breaking records has become a constant in her life, as in 2019 she became the oldest woman to win the 100m at a World Championships. In 2013, she became the first sprinter to win gold medals in the 100, 200 and 4x100 metres at the same World Championships.

Veronica Campbell-Brown (Jamaica)

Veronica Campbell-Brown is an eight-time Olympic medallist. Three of those medals are gold. In 2008, she became the second woman to win back-to-back Olympic titles over 200 metres.  With personal bests of 10.76  and 21.74 over the 100m and 200m, respectively, VCB is one of the fastest women of all time. Her World Championships credentials are also impressive, claiming three gold, seven silver and a bronze medal over the course of a fantastic career that has spanned two decades.

Elaine Thompson-Herah (Jamaica)

Elaine Thompson-Herah is the heir apparent to the throne of Jamaican female sprinting and many believe that had it not been for injuries, she would have already been firmly seated on that throne. Nonetheless, her resume is impressive, having claimed the 100 and 200-metre gold medals at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games and a silver medal at the 2015 World Championships where she came to prominence courtesy of a memorable battle with Dutchwoman Dafne Schippers. In a stirring battle, the two raced to the line with Schippers just edging the Jamaican, who clocked a personal best 21.66, the fifth-fastest time in history. Thompson's personal best of 10.70, is the joint fourth-fastest time in history and a Jamaican national record she shares with Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce.

Shaunae Miller-Uibo (Bahamas)

Shaunae Miller-Uibo famously dove over the line in beat United States legend, Alyson Felix in the 2016 Olympics 400-metre final. She has also mined two silver medals in 2015 and 2019 over the distance at World Championships and earned a bronze medal in the event in 2017. Miller-Uibo holds The Bahamas’ national record over 400m (48.37), the sixth-fastest time in history, and 200 metres (21.74).  Unofficially, Miller-Uibo is also the fastest woman of all time in the 200-metres straight and the 300-metres indoor events.

Merlene Ottey (Jamaica)

For a long time, Merlene Ottey was Jamaica’s most cherished sprinter, courtesy of her long and illustrious career. Along the way, she earned three silver and six bronze medals at the Olympic Games. She is also a three-time World Champion and has also won four silver and seven bronze medals as well. Those, combined with the three gold, two silver and the two bronze medals she won at the World Indoor Championships, bring her global medal haul to a remarkable 30. She still remains the only woman to break 22 seconds indoors and boasts personal bests of 10.74 and 21.64 over the 100m and 200m, respectively.

Deon Hemmings (Jamaica)

Deon Hemmings was the first Jamaican woman to win an Olympic gold medal when she blew away the dual challenge of the United States’ Kim Batten and Tonja Buford to win the 400-metres hurdles title at the Atlanta Games in 1996. She won in 52.82, which was an Olympic record and still one of the fastest times ever run. During her stellar career, Hemmings also won two silver medals at the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia. In between, Hemmings was second at the World Championships in Athens in 1997, and third in Seville two years later. She also claimed a bronze medal at the 1995 World Championships in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Melaine Walker (Jamaica)

Melaine Walker was the queen of the 400m hurdles in 2008 and 2009 when she won the IAAF World Athletics Final in Thessaloniki, Greece.  In Beijing in 2008, Walker won the 400 metres hurdles in an Olympic record 52.64. She would claim her first World Athletics Final title later that year, winning in 54.06 before heading to the World Championships in 2009 to run 52.42, then the second-fastest time in history. For her achievements in 2008, Walker was named Jamaican Sportswoman of the Year along with another legend of track and field, Veronica-Campbell-Brown.

Ana Quirot (Cuba)

Cuba’s Ana Fidelia Quirot Moré is regarded as one of the finest 800-metre athletes of all time. The claim is not without merit, as despite never winning an Olympic Gold, she had been dominant throughout her career. That career was not without accolades though, as she mined bronze in the Barcelona Olympics in 1992 before going one better in Atlanta four years later. That 1996 Olympic silver lay in between Gold medals at the 1995 Gothenburg World Championships and the Athens equivalent in 1997. Before that, she had earned a silver at the Tokyo World Championships in 1991.  She was also a four-time gold medallist at the Pan American Games and at the Central American and Caribbean Games while winning gold over 400 and 800 metres at the World Cup in Barcelona in 1989. In 1988, Quirot was favoured to win Olympic Gold after going that season unbeaten, inclusive of beating her main rivals Olympic champion East Germany’s Sigrun Wodars and her teammate silver medallist Christine Watchel. Unfortunately, politics reared its ugly head and Cuba would end up boycotting the 1988 Olympic Games. Quirot would never recover.

Nicolette Fernandes (Guyana)

Nicolette Fernandes has been the flagbearer for Guyana and the Caribbean in women’s squash for almost 20 years. She was a bronze medallist at the Central America and Caribbean Games all the way back in 2002 before claiming gold, the country’s only medal four years later. She would win a bronze in 2010 while claiming gold at the South American Games that same year. She won a bronze medal in Guadalajara at the Pan American Games in 2011. Fernandes’ career was not without its setbacks though. In 2007, a serious knee injury put the squash ace out for almost two years, but she returned with a bang in 2009, earning the Guyanese National Sports Commission’s Sportswoman of the year award. Outside of her achievements for Guyana, Fernandes has not won any of the four majors, the World Open, British Open, hong Kong Open or Qatar Classic, but she has won a Wispa Tour Series and achieved a world ranking as high as 19.

Tonique Williams-Darling (Bahamas)

Tonique Williams Darling makes our list for her exploits between 2004 and 2006. In that period, the then 28-year-old, won the Olympics in Athens, Greece, before going on to do the same at the Helsinki World Championships in 2005. In 2004, she also earned a silver medal at the World Indoor Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

Pauline Davis-Thompson (Bahamas)

Another Bahamian, Pauline Davis, also makes the list because of her accolades but also because of her sheer longevity. Davis-Thompson has been to five Olympic Games and did not win her first medal until her fourth appearance when she was part of a silver-medal winning 4x100-metre team at the 1996 Atlanta Games. Four years later, in Sydney, Davis-Thompson went one better with her 4x100-metre team and at 34 years old, hit the tape first in the 200 metres to cap off her career in style. Five years earlier, Davis-Thompson had finished second in the 400 metres at the World Championships in Gothenburg, Sweden, showing an amazing range that would be hard to replicate. She also earned bronze and silver medals at the World Indoor Championships in 1995 and 1999.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.