Ben Stokes, Jofra Archer and Jos Buttler are among the England players to be rested for the ODI series against South Africa, but they will return for the Twenty20s.

All-rounder Stokes, paceman Archer, wicketkeeper-batsman Buttler and quick Mark Wood have not been included in a 16-man squad for three ODIs in February.

Seamer Pat Brown, batsman Tom Banton, spinner Matt Parkinson and fast bowler Saqib Mahmood are included for the first time in the 50-over format.

Joe Root is among eight players from England's triumphant Cricket World Cup squad to be selected, but the Test captain will not feature in the T20 series - which comes after the ODIs.

Moeen Ali and Jason Roy were included in both squads after missing the tour of New Zealand. 

There is no place for Banton, Sam Billings, Lewis Gregory, Mahmood and James Vince in a party of 16 for the contests in the shortest format.

England national selector Ed Smith said: "These two squads were selected with an eye on the T20 World Cup in Australia in 2020.

"In the T20s, a number of players who were rested for the successful 3-2 victory in New Zealand return to the squad: Jos Buttler, Jofra Archer, Ben Stokes, Moeen Ali and Jason Roy.

"We want to expand the pool of players who can perform successfully for England, while also helping the team to peak for major tournaments."

 

England ODI squad: Eoin Morgan (captain), Moeen Ali, Jonny Bairstow, Tom Banton, Pat Brown, Sam Curran, Tom Curran, Joe Denly, Chris Jordan, Saqib Mahmood, Dawid Malan, Matt Parkinson, Adil Rashid, Joe Root, Jason Roy, Chris Woakes.

England T20 squad: Eoin Morgan (captain) Moeen Ali, Jofra Archer, Jonny Bairstow, Jos Buttler, Pat Brown, Sam Curran, Tom Curran, Joe Denly, Chris Jordan, Dawid Malan, Matt Parkinson, Adil Rashid, Jason Roy, Ben Stokes, Mark Wood. 

New Zealand Cricket (NZC) has lodged a complaint with local police in response to the racist abuse directed at Jofra Archer during the first Test in Mount Maunganui.

NZC apologised to Archer and launched an investigation after the England paceman said a spectator shouted "disturbing" insults on the final day at Bay Oval last week.

The matter has been turned over to authorities in the North Island city of Tauranga as attempts to identify the individual continue.

"Information gathered from an inquiry which included studying CCTV footage, listening to audio, interviewing bystanders and obtaining material on social media has been incorporated in the complaint," read an NZC statement.

"While the information-gathering exercise was useful, NZC has been unable to conclusively identify the person responsible and is therefore unable to comment on public speculation regarding his personal details."

NZC chief executive David White said sufficient evidence had been gathered to warrant police involvement.

"What happened to Jofra was reprehensible and has led to a general upscaling of security around the area of racial abuse at all our international venues," he said.

"Should the person responsible ever reoffend, we believe we have enough information to link him to the Bay Oval incident."

White said NZC would seek to impose a "lengthy" ban from all international venues in New Zealand if police inquiries ended in a conclusive identification.

England lost the match by an innings and 65 runs and were consigned to a series defeat on Tuesday as a rain-affected second Test ended in a draw.

Joe Root has the support of everyone in the England dressing room when it comes to his Test captaincy, Ben Stokes has insisted.

Questions over Root's position have resurfaced in the wake of the chastening defeat to New Zealand in the first Test at Mount Maunganui on Monday.

England were beaten by an innings and 65 runs, with Root contributing just 13 as he dropped out of the top 10 of the ICC's Test batting rankings.

Stokes, however, says there is no better candidate for the role and believes pinning the blame for England's struggles on the captain alone is unfair.

"Joe knows that he's got the backing of everybody in the changing room: players, backroom staff and management," said the all-rounder, according to Cricinfo. "That's the main thing that counts for us as players in a very tightknit group. He knows that everybody in that changing room 100 per cent backs him, as I do.

"The pressures of being England Test captain is huge. It can be one of the most criticised jobs in England at times. And sometimes that criticism is unfair, I would say. There are 11 guys that contribute to a win or loss. It doesn't all fall on the captain.

"We put our hands up as players when we don't perform. But, unfortunately, Joe cops most of that [criticism]. But as a playing group, we stick together, and we hold our hands up together as well.

"He's fine. He's Joe Root. He is England captain and there's no one else to do it."

The opening Test was marred by racist abuse that England bowler Jofra Archer revealed he suffered from a spectator.

New Zealand Cricket (NZC) launched an investigation and captain Kane Williamson promised to apologise in person after Archer said he heard racist insults from a member of the crowd.

Stokes, who has New Zealand and Maori heritage, described the incident as "pretty horrific" but said the country was better represented by those who offered their support towards Archer.

"I'm obviously very proud of my heritage and where I'm from," Stokes said. "I'll always respect that. The tattoo on my arm just signifies where the family comes from.

"Coming back to New Zealand, it's not just a cricket tour for me. It's also a great time to be able to catch up with family that I don't get to see that often. I came out a week before the Test guys to stay with my mum and dad, which was awesome. I got to see brothers, sisters, cousins and everything like that. Every time I manage to come back it's really good.

"It wasn't a nice way to end the Test match and it's a shame because that doesn't represent what New Zealand is about as a country whatsoever. New Zealand is more accurately represented by how much support Jofra has had, not just from the New Zealand cricket team, but New Zealand in general after that incident.

"That's the main thing for us now: making Jofra aware that we've got his back. It was a pretty horrific incident and something that shouldn't happen in sport or in the world in general in 2019."

England paceman Jofra Archer described the racist abuse he suffered in the Test series opener against New Zealand as "a real shame".

Archer was targeted by a fan during England's heavy loss to New Zealand in the first Test in Mount Maunganui.

The 24-year-old is set to be swiftly back in action, with the second Test starting in Hamilton on Friday.

"The first thing I want to say about what happened towards the end of the Test at Mount Maunganui is that I'm over it," Archer told the Daily Mail.

"I've left what happened at the ground and I've moved on. I should also say it was just one person who was shouting stuff.

"But I found the incident a real shame. When you come to another country, you half expect fans to have a go at your cricket. If someone wants to shout at me and tell me I'm bowling badly, that's fine. I may not agree but it's fine. It's part of the experience of being a touring cricketer.

"To hear racism, though – that's another matter. There is no time or place for it in any walk of life, let alone cricket. It's just not called for."

Archer, who finished with disappointing figures of 1-107 in an innings defeat in the series opener, is eager for England to bounce back in the second Test.

"I don't want to go into the details of what was said but I know what I heard," he said. "I thought members of the crowd around the guy might have pulled him up because I could hear him from the pitch as I was walking off."

He added: "Now my only goal is to make sure we finish this series on a high because we were all disappointed with the result in the first Test."

Kane Williamson has hailed a special performance from his New Zealand team after the Black Caps dismantled England in the first Test of a two-match series.

After BJ Watling (205) and Mitchell Santner (126) starred for New Zealand with the bat, Neil Wagner stole the show on Monday with a five-wicket haul to claim an innings-and-65-runs win at Mount Maunganui.

England had looked in a promising position at the end of their first innings, having accumulated 353, with Rory Burns (52), Joe Denly (74) and Ben Stokes (91) all registering half-centuries.

However, Williamson - who scored 51 himself - has put the difference between the sides down to the impact of Watling and Santner.

"To lose the toss and be 350 behind in the first innings required something special," Williamson said. "And it was something special for 200 overs to get us into a position which gave us a chance.

"To get 600 gave us that opportunity to bowl last on that wicket, so a huge amount of credit goes to the way the middle-order built those partnerships.

"BJ Watling with 200 and Mitch Santner with his first Test hundred were incredibly valuable and hugely required. Colin de Grandhomme batted well, too.

"The pitch started to deteriorate which is what you want to see in Test cricket. But when you do see that you want to have won the toss. This is certainly right up there in terms of a tough, grinding Test victory.

"Scores of 50 and 60 weren't enough to turn the momentum from England's first innings, it did require something large and for a long period of time and that's what those guys did. It was a brilliant effort against a very strong England bowling attack.

"It was outstanding to see that middle order apply themselves like that. BJ is such a tough competitor and just cares about getting the team into a position to win cricket games. It goes a long way to him applying himself for near on 500 balls, which is an amazing effort. A lot of people wish they could bat 500 balls, including myself.

"It was a brilliant, brilliant performance and it took a huge amount of hard work. For BJ and Mitch to keep soaking up that pressure was outstanding and something that is clearly very hard to do for everybody."

New Zealand's victory was somewhat overshadowed by Jofra Archer stating he had received racist abuse from a spectator while walking off after he was dismissed for 30 towards the end of England's second innings.

An investigation has been opened and New Zealand Cricket promised to apologise to Barbados-born Archer on Tuesday, ahead of the second Test in Hamilton three days later.

New Zealand Cricket will apologise to Jofra Archer after the England bowler was racially abused by a spectator during the Black Caps' Test victory at Bay Oval.

Archer put on a stand of 30 alongside Sam Curran (29 not out) as England attempted to salvage a draw on day five in Mount Maunganui, but was eventually dismissed by Neil Wagner (5-44) as the tourists slumped to an innings and 65-run defeat.

The 24-year-old Barbados-born fast bowler subsequently claimed a member of the Bay Oval crowd had directed racist abuse at him.

"A bit disturbing hearing racial insults today whilst battling to help save my team, the crowd was been amazing this week except for that one guy," Archer tweeted.

The Black Caps have issued a swift response, stating they will contact Archer on Tuesday to issue an apology, while confirming there is to be an investigation into the matter.

"New Zealand Cricket (NZC) will be contacting and apologising to English fast bowler Jofra Archer, who was racially abused by a spectator as he left the field at the conclusion of the first Test at Bay Oval, Mount Maunganui," a statement issued read.

"Although security providers at the venue were unable to locate the perpetrator, NZC will be examining CCTV footage and making further inquiries tomorrow in an endeavour to identify the man responsible.

"NZC has zero tolerance towards abusive or offensive language at any of its venues and will refer any developments in the case to police.

"It will contact Mr Archer tomorrow to apologise for the unacceptable experience, and to promise increased vigilance in the matter when the teams next meet in Hamilton."

Jofra Archer has claimed he was racially abused by a member of the crowd as England lost the first Test to New Zealand by an innings and 65 runs.

The opening match of England's two-Test series against the Black Caps ended in a heavy loss in Mount Maunganui, as Neil Wagner took 5-44 to decimate what was left of the tourists' batting order on Monday.

Archer - who had bowling figures of 1-107 in New Zealand's innings as the hosts declared on 615-9 - put on a stand with Sam Curran (29 not out) in an attempt to rescue a draw, but the 24-year-old eventually succumbed to Wagner on 30.

The Barbados-born paceman then stated afterwards he heard racist insults directed at him from a person in the crowd at the Bay Oval.

"A bit disturbing hearing racial insults today whilst battling to help save my team, the crowd was been amazing this week except for that one guy," Archer tweeted.

England round off their tour of New Zealand with a second and final Test at Seddon Park in Hamilton.

England battled to a good position after the late scalp of Kane Williamson left New Zealand 144-4 at stumps on day two of the first Test on Friday.

A Sam Curran delivery caught New Zealand captain Williamson (51) off guard in the final session in Mount Maunganui, where the Black Caps closed the day 209 runs adrift with six wickets in hand.

After Tom Latham (8), Jeet Raval (19) and Ross Taylor (25) fell cheaply in response to England's 353, Williamson posted his 31st Test half-century before exiting to Curran (2-28).

Henry Nicholls (26 not out) survived a scary blow to the helmet off the bowling of Jofra Archer as he and BJ Watling (6 not out) saw out the remaining overs.

Earlier in the day, New Zealand produced an honest performance with the ball, having toiled on day one against England.

An eventful morning session saw Tim Southee (4-88) produce a three-wicket burst to put England on the back foot – Ben Stokes (91) the first to go after the tourists resumed on 241-4.

Stokes – who started the day on 67 – fell nine runs short of his third Test century in five matches when Taylor held on to a catch first slip.

Southee struck three times in 11 balls as he also dismissed Ollie Pope (29) and Curran (0), with Archer (4) negotiating the hat-trick ball only to fall to Trent Boult (1-97) the following over.

From the relative comfort of 277-4 to 295-8, England found themselves in trouble until Jos Buttler (43) and Jack Leach (18 not out) added some valuable runs to lead the visitors past 350 before Neil Wagner (3-90) wrapped things up following lunch.

Dom Sibley will open the batting for England in the first Test against New Zealand, while Sam Curran has been given the nod ahead of Chris Woakes.

The opening clash of the two-match series begins in Mount Maunganui on Thursday, with debutant Sibley joining Rory Burns at the top of the order.

Curran has been preferred to fellow all-rounder Woakes in a line-up unchanged from the three-day warm-up fixture with New Zealand A.

Warwickshire star Sibley scored 14 in that match, in which England batted for only one innings and settled for a draw.

He was the stand-out performer in the 2019 County Championship season, scoring 1,324 runs at an average of 69.68.

England, who beat the Black Caps in the Cricket World Cup final and won the T20 series 3-2, have won only two of their last 11 Test series away from home.

England team to face New Zealand: 

Rory Burns, Dom Sibley, Joe Denly, Joe Root, Ben Stokes, Ollie Pope, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran, Jofra Archer, Jack Leach, Stuart Broad.

Legendary West Indies all-rounder Gary Sobers does not believe the regional cricket team did enough to hold on to Barbadian-born fast bowler Jofra Archer and must be a little ‘sad’ to have missed out on such a top prospect.

The 24-year-old was born in Barbados and played youth cricket for the Windies but failed to secure a spot on the youth World Cup team.  The player later moved to England before deciding to switch allegiance and represent the country of his father’s birth.

Archer made his debut for England at the World Cup earlier this year, after a change in the country’s eligibility rules allowed the player to represent England earlier than originally stipulated.  The bowler went on to make a major impact at the tournament as England claimed a maiden title.  Archer then went on to make his impact felt during the Ashes series.

“We have lost a good one, there's no doubt about that," Sobers told the DailyMail.

“Jofra is an amazing bowler. For him to jump to where he is in the England team already is tremendous. I believe there was an argument as to whether they should play him in the World Cup but eventually they got over that and they must be very happy they did because he has been great for them,” he added.

“The West Indies must be very sad when they see what he has done because we don't seem to have given him the opportunities we should have done," said Sobers. 

"He started in Barbados and wanted to get in the West Indies team but he didn't get the chance to do that so he went to the best place he could.”

Joe Root will captain England's Test side regardless of their new head coach, Ashley Giles has confirmed.

Test skipper Root came under pressure in the recent Ashes series as England were held to a 2-2 draw, seeing Australia retain the urn as tourists for the first time since 2001.

The uncertainty around the coaching position added to speculation regarding the Yorkshireman's future, with Trevor Bayliss leaving his role following the series.

But Giles, the managing director of England men's cricket, has confirmed Root will continue to lead the side going forward.

"There have been no questions asked [about Root's future] by me," Giles told Sky Sports News. "I would hope that is the most important thing for now.

"One of the most important things for Joe is that we now redress that balance between red and white-ball cricket and we have more focus on Test match cricket.

"And when the new coach arrives, Joe gets a choice to sit down with him and really plan and decide a way forward - with me as well - our DNA around Test cricket going forward.

"If I were Joe, and we've had these discussions, we need to start planning towards winning the Ashes back in Australia in just over two years."

England will have one coach across all formats when they replace Bayliss, with Giles adding: "It's an exciting process because it's my first big appointment and we need to get it right."

The team's central contracts for the 2019-20 season were confirmed on Friday, with Eoin Morgan, England's white-ball captain, also set to continue in his role after winning the Cricket World Cup.

He has been given a limited-overs contract again, with Jofra Archer awarded an all-format deal.

The paceman starred in his first international campaign, playing key roles as England won the Cricket World Cup and drew the Ashes.

Rory Burns has been handed a Test contract following his performances against Australia, although Joe Denly got a white-ball deal.

Moeen Ali and Adil Rashid, previously contracted across all three formats, received limited-overs agreements, while Alex Hales, Liam Plunkett and David Willey missed out completely.

Jack Leach and Sam Curran were granted incremental deals.

The 2019 Ashes certainly lived up to the pre-series hype.

England and Australia had no shortage of talent on display but also glaring holes in both sides were exposed over the course of five intriguing battles that provided plenty of twists and turns.

There were brilliant exhibitions of fast bowling. There were centuries (thanks largely to Steve Smith!). There was a fairy-tale finish for the ages, too, but in the end no outright winner.

Australia retained the Ashes but England's victory at The Oval in the fifth and final chapter means a 2-2 result, the first series draw between the rivals since 1972.

Here, Omnisport picks out the key moments as we recap each Test.

 

AUSTRALIA EIGHT DOWN, ANDERSON OUT

Tim Paine’s decision to bat first in the series opener appeared foolish when his side slipped to 122-8 on the opening day Edgbaston. Stuart Broad and Chris Woakes did the damage, but James Anderson was only able to bowl four overs before leaving the field.

His absence was keenly felt as, with Smith beginning his one-man crusade against the England attack, Australia’s last two wickets added 166 runs. Peter Siddle and Nathan Lyon showed the supposed batsmen how it should be done in bowler-friendly conditions, supporting their former captain, who finished up with 144 as a potentially disastrous first innings was transformed into a competitive total.

Anderson, meanwhile, only appeared again in the game to bat due to a calf problem. He attempted a comeback in time to play at his home ground of Old Trafford later in the series, but a setback on second XI duty for Lancashire scuppered that plan, meaning England's all-time leading wicket-taker in the longest format sent down just 24 deliveries against Australia.

 

ARCHER MAKES AN INSTANT IMPACT 

With Anderson out, England handed a debut to Jofra Archer for the second Test at Lord's. The pace bowler had been a key component of the one-day squad that won the Cricket World Cup on home soil earlier in the year but warned the public not to expect "miracles" in his Test bow.

There was no miracle – Archer was not quite able to bowl England to victory in the final session of a game that had seen the entire first day wiped out by rain – but his performance caused quite a stir.

He claimed five wickets in the match, struck down Smith with a seriously quick bouncer when the batsman was seemingly on course for a third successive triple-figure knock and, subsequently, played his part in Test history as the first concussion substitute was used. Marnus Labuschagne was laid low by a delivery from Archer too, yet beat the count to carry on batting and make a crucial half-century to secure a draw.

 

HEADINGLEY MIRACLE - VOL II

At a venue where Ian Botham famously salvaged a seemingly lost cause to secure an unlikely Ashes victory in the 1981 series, Ben Stokes produced a performance at Headingley that will see him forever remembered in crick folklore.

Bowled out for just 67 in their first innings, England's valiant bid to reach a tough victory target of 359 appeared set to fall short when they slipped from 245-4 to 286-9 on the fourth afternoon. Yet Stokes refused to give in, choosing to go on the attack with a display of hitting that, with each boundary, raised the possibility of a stunning result.

The left-hander made 135 not out with eight sixes to drag his team over the line, aided by last-man Jack Leach surviving 17 balls and contributing a quick single that turned him into a cult hero. Australia failed to remain composed amid the carnage, wasting their final review and butchering a run-out chance when Lyon somehow fumbled a tame throw to the bowler's end.

 

SMITH AT THE DOUBLE

Having missed the defeat in Leeds due to concussion, Smith returned as the series shifted across the Pennines to Manchester – and made up for lost time with another telling contribution with the bat.  England's plans to rough him up with the short ball failed to pay off as the right-hander made his third Ashes double hundred, in the process taking his tally past 500 runs for a third successive series.

Given a life when dismissed off a no ball from spinner Leach, the former skipper finished up with 211 out of Australia's 497-8 declared. England avoided having to follow-on in reply but 82 from Smith second time around left Root's side needing another Herculean fourth-innings performance to keep the series alive.

While Stokes failed to fire again, it appeared the great escape could be on when Leach combined with Somerset colleague Craig Overton to push the game into the final hour. Fearing another opportunity was set to go begging, Paine turned to Labuschagne's leg spin. The move paid off as he dismissed Leach, opening the door just wide enough for the excellent Josh Hazlewood to wrap up victory in fading light as the tourists moved 2-1 ahead.

 

A PAINE-FUL DECISION & JOE 90

Perhaps it was the fact the urn was already retained, almost akin to a last-day-of-school situation, that led to captain Paine opting to bowl first after winning the toss. England failed to fully capitalise on the opportunity, posting 294, but Smith only (only!) made 82 as Archer's second six-wicket haul in the series secured a useful first-innings lead.

Following a dash home after day one to see the birth of his daughter, England opener Joe Denly celebrated the new arrival with a Test-best score of 94, helping to set Australia plenty in the final innings on a worn surface.

Broad dismissed David Warner for a seventh time in 10 innings – the opener finished the series with 95 runs (only Hazlewood posted a lower average for the visitors than the left-hander's 9.50) – and when Smith fell into England’s leg-side trap, it was just a matter of when, not if, the hosts would triumph. Matthew Wade went down swinging with a hundred, but the topsy-turvy series ended level.

Ben Stokes suggested an Ashes series draw was a fair result and was not interested in entertaining "what ifs" for England after they beat Australia in the fifth Test.

England ran out 135-run winners at the Oval on Sunday to earn a stalemate, yet their hopes of claiming the urn had been ended a week earlier in defeat at Old Trafford.

The triumph in the last Test was the first time England had got the better of a full-strength Australia, with the outstanding Steve Smith limited to just 23 in his second innings.

But Stokes did not want to reflect on how the series might have panned out had they produced the same level of performance earlier in the series.

"I don't think you can ever look back and say, 'What if this happened', 'What if we'd done this differently'," he said, having been named England's player of the series by Australia coach Justin Langer.

"I think it's just been a great series of cricket, to be honest. It's ebbed and flowed in certain areas throughout every game. I think that's shown in the end result with it being 2-2.

"There's been two very evenly matched teams and two very competitive teams, as Ashes cricket always is. I think everyone's been treated to another great Ashes series."

Stokes handed England a historic one-wicket win in the third Test at Headingley with a remarkable unbeaten knock of 135.

 

But having earlier suggested it would mean little if England did not regain the Ashes, the all-rounder indicated he still felt that way.

"It'll probably be something to look back on in a few years' time," he said.

"You know the saying that you'd probably give it all back if it meant we ended up lifting the urn at the end. But I'll come to that innings in a few years' time."

Stokes said he and the team are "100 per cent" behind captain Joe Root, while he picked out Rory Burns and Joe Denly for praise at the top of the order.

"Everyone who has come into the Test team has put their hand up and shown they can compete at the highest level," he said.

As well as Burns and Denly, Jofra Archer was another breakout star, collecting the player of the match honours in the fifth Test after taking 6-62 in Australia's first innings.

Archer, who shone on his debut in the second Test but later lacked consistency, said: "I went wicketless in two innings as well, you know?

"It's Test cricket for you. One day, it might be there; the next innings, it might not be. You have to keep going.

"There will be good days and there will be bad days. It's not every day I'm going to get a wicket. I might go wicketless for a few innings. I have to keep going. The team will back me up regardless."

Jofra Archer could sense Steve Smith was not at his best at The Oval, where England denied Australia's Ashes hero a fourth three-figure score of a remarkable series.

Smith, who revealed after his first innings 80 he has been struggling with flu, was trapped lbw by Chris Woakes on day two.

Even when not at full health, the right-hander still provided the most impressive resistance of any member of the Australia batting line-up, which wilted in response to England's 294 all out.

The tourists may have already retained the urn but Archer's six-for restricted them to 225, with England surviving four overs before the close to take a lead of 78 runs into day three.

Asked in a media conference about England's satisfaction in getting Smith out for what, by his standards, was a low score, Archer replied: "It's weird, every time he bats, I don't know what it is, he literally cannot get out.

"When he plays a bad shot the ball just lands in no-man's land. Obviously he's a good batter, he's got a good temperament but the ball just never goes to hand.

"He didn't look himself today, he didn't look as nailed on, he didn't seem the same way. 

"We know he's going to miss one. We always felt we had a chance."

Archer took the last wicket of the innings courtesy of a stunning one-handed catch from Rory Burns to dismiss Peter Siddle.

"When I saw him hit the ball I thought it was four to be honest, when I saw it going near him I didn't think it was going to carry either," said Archer of that final wicket.

"Special catch, even better to get us off the field. Sometimes if you don't get them out tonight they come back tomorrow and probably get another 30 or 40 runs and the lead isn't big.

"I don't think we should underestimate how good that catch was, especially with the position it's put us in."

Little stock will be put in England drawing the series to those outside the camp, but Archer still believes there is plenty at stake in the final Test.

"It would mean a lot for the team [to draw the series], there's still a lot to play for," Archer added. "There's still the Test championship and our own personal game, although the Ashes are lost we've still got a lot to play for."

David Warner set an unwanted record when he failed again on day two of the final Ashes Test, but Australia talisman Steve Smith was unbeaten at lunch after Jofra Archer's double strike at The Oval.

Mitchell Marsh (5-46) claimed a maiden five-wicket Test haul and Pat Cummins (3-84) dismissed Jos Buttler for 70 to bowl England out for 294 early on a sunny Friday in London.

The tourists, striving for a 3-1 series win after retaining the urn at Old Trafford, were in trouble on 14-2, with opener Warner and Marcus Harris falling to the excellent Archer.

Warner made only five to become the first opener to fall for eight single-digit scores in a Test series, but the prolific Smith (14 not out) and Marnus Labuschagne (32no) saw Australia through to 55-2 at the end of the morning session.

Buttler added only six runs to his overnight score before playing on to a delivery from the outstanding Cummins after England resumed on 271-8.

Jack Leach (21) also chopped to end the innings and give recalled all-rounder Marsh, who stated "most of Australia hates me" after taking four wickets on the opening day, his best Test figures.

Archer then steamed in to see the back of both of Australia's struggling openers, Warner given out caught behind following a review after Marais Erasmus did not detect an edge, and Harris (three) snicking to Ben Stokes at second slip.

Stuart Broad was also on the money with the new ball, but Labuschagne showed good judgement and scored boundaries on both sides of the wicket after weathering an early storm.

Smith played and missed to Archer on more than one occasion and Sam Curran probed with a touch of swing, but there was more than a sense of deja vu as fidgety former Australia captain Smith set himself ominously.

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