Isolation units and Coronavirus checkpoints at cricket grounds could see the West Indies still making the trip to that country for closed-door games.

The West Indies were scheduled to start a three-Test duel with England at T/he Oval, Edgbaston, and Lord’s on June 4 until the rapid spread of COVID-19 across Europe threatened to derail those plans.

The ECB and Cricket West Indies have been trying to come up with solutions to keep what is expected to be a lucrative series alive.

According to reports, the ECB is stepping up plans to resume cricket in June, but with no spectators, but that broadcasting would still go ahead since that was safer and that is where the majority of money to be earned from the series would be in any case.

The approach, ECB Director of Special Projects, Steve Elworthy, explained that any approach involving re-starting cricket in England would mean creating a sterile environment, safe for players and staff.

The United Kingdom’s problems with containing COVID-19 could mean England’s home series against the West Indies could be moved to the Caribbean where the threat has been markedly lower than Europe.

Cricket West Indies (CWI) and the England Cricket Board (ECB) have been trying to find a work-around so as not to delay the start of the three-Test series set to begin on June 4 at the Kia Oval.

COVID-19 cases are expected to peak in the United Kingdom in June, making it almost a certainty that the start of the English domestic season will be delayed.

The Caribbean, if it continues to remain relatively COVID-19 free, could become third-party hosts for other series, reportedly offering to provide the venues for England’s home fixtures against Pakistan in July.

There is also the possibility that the tour of England could be put off until September, after the West Indies host New Zealand in three One-Day Internationals and three Twenty20 Internationals from July 8 to July 19 and after South Africa visit for two Tests and five T20Is scheduled for July 23-August 16.

A delay could also mean that the Hero Caribbean Premier League could be pushed back all the way until December.

Johnny Grave, Cricket West Indies Chief Executive Officer, is not pleased with the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) who revised their eligibility criteria in a bid to make sure that Barbadian paceman Jofra Archer can turn out for the country.

According to Grave, the concern is not just over Archer, but that other talented Caribbean players could be lured away from playing for their region, using the same ‘long-term county contracts’ that have paved the way for Archer.

The Windies were hoping they would have had Archer for the World Cup in 2019, but the exciting 23-year-old, one of the brightest prospects in world cricket today, made it clear, his intentions to turn out for England whenever eligibility requirements were met.

The ECB had previously required that for a player to be eligible to turn out for England, they must have seven years of residency under their belt, however, last week that was reduced to just three.

“We respect Jofra’s decision, the rules allow him to [switch country]. But on a personal level, and as an Englishman, I don’t like the concept of the ECB poaching players who have been part of another system up to the age of 19,” said Graves.

“I hope no other West Indian cricketers follow that path and hope it doesn’t lead to counties doing their talent ID in the Caribbean, taking our players into the public school system and then on to offering them lucrative long-term county contracts and then possibly on to playing for England.”

Interestingly, Archer’s first game for England could very well be in the Caribbean next year when England tour the region for three Tests, five One-Day Internationals and three Twenty20s from January 23 to March 10. Archer would become eligible to play for England in March, right in time for the T20 fixtures.

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