Patrick Mahomes is "optimistic" of agreeing a new contract with the Kansas City Chiefs and has praised the team for how they "handle things the right way".

With one year left on his rookie deal, Mahomes is in line for a lucrative extension after winning NFL MVP in 2018, his first year as a starter, before he was Super Bowl MVP in the Chiefs' dramatic win over the San Francisco 49ers last month.

The team and player have repeatedly expressed their mutual desire for a deal to be done and the 24-year-old remains confident that will happen at the right time.

"The best thing about this team and this organization is they handle things the right way," Mahomes said to SiriusXM NFL Radio.

"So, for me, obviously, I'm optimistic of getting that contract and extending my time in Kansas City. 

"I'm just going to go about being who I am just like I have since the beginning since I was the backup until now. That's just to go out there, love this game, treat people the right way, and all that stuff handles itself. 

"I'm optimistic just to be able to be a Kansas City Chief for a long time."

The Chiefs retain control over Mahomes for the foreseeable future, with the fifth-year option in 2021 and the franchise tag available after that should there be any complications in negotiations, which may not gather pace before the new CBA.

Quarterback Mahomes also discussed his offseason routine, which will consist of work on his body before a bid to improve his pocket presence.

He added: "These first few weeks, I've really kind of been building the injury prevention stuff. The stuff I dealt with this year, with the ankle and with the knee, I've really been getting after that.

"I'm trying to make sure I can be 100 percent going into this next season, 120 percent, and ready to take on the impact of another entire football season. 

"Every year is different, you've got to find ways to go out there and win football games. As of right now, it has been about my body and getting myself in the best shape possible.

"As I get on to it and start working with my quarterback coach in quarterback drills, I'll work on my footwork and work on that stuff.

"I can be better from the pocket and keep getting better because that's an area I still need to improve on. If I can get better there, extending plays is just a bonus."

With free agency approaching, the Super Bowl champions are expected to use the franchise tag or transition tag on Pro-Bowl defensive lineman Chris Jones as they shape their roster for another championship run.

Patrick Mahomes has made the same impact on the NFL that The Beatles did on music and the "rock star" Super Bowl MVP is well on his way to greatness with the same mindset as Pele.

That is according to Adam Cook, the man who nurtured the Kansas City Chiefs quarterback's phenomenal talent at Whitehouse High School in Texas.

Mahomes' stardom was catapulted to another stratosphere when he inspired the Chiefs' stunning 31-20 Super Bowl comeback victory over the San Francisco 49ers at Hard Rock Stadium on February 2.

The 2018 NFL MVP got the Chiefs out of a hole to end their 50-year wait for a Super Bowl triumph.

Cook witnessed Mahomes' ability in a variety of sports and saw his signal-calling qualities at close quarters in his roles as quarterback coach, offensive coordinator and head coach at Whitehouse.

Arizona Cardinals head coach Kliff Kingsbury got Cook a ticket for what he described as "the experience of a lifetime" of seeing his former student's finest hour on a glorious Sunday in Miami.

Cook knew Mahomes was something special when he first coached him in the fifth grade and is not surprised to see him striking the right notes at the highest level.

Asked if the 24-year-old can become an NFL great, he told Omnisport: "No doubt about it, that is what you are seeing. It's something we kind of expect, I expect it for him.

"Any time you want to talk about the greats; Dan Marino never won the Super Bowl, some great players never achieved that. The discussion you get is they never did win the big one, well Patrick has been the league MVP, he's won a Super Bowl and won Super Bowl MVP.

"He's already established himself as a Hall of Famer. Those are the things you are going to look at, the numbers he has put up. But knowing he's only 24 years old, if he keeps doing what he's doing and keeps his head level right, keeps working like he's been doing, yes, he could go down as one of the greatest.

"Definitely in my mind he's becoming the face of the NFL. He's so exciting, he's so fun to watch. He's got good people around him and he is where he is now because of the decisions he has made in his life.

"There is nothing wrong with wanting to be great, it's just are you willing to pay the price for being in those positions? That's the key and Patrick has made sacrifices in his life.

"He's like a rock star, much like The Beatles. Their lives were never the same, they ultimately changed everything about rock. They influenced so much of what we listen to today and I think Patrick is doing that to the NFL. He's changing the way the game is played."

That will be music to the ears of Chiefs fans, as will Cook's comparison of their prized asset to the legendary Pele.

Cook, now athletics director at Whitehouse, added: "I spent a year looking into sports psychology and read some great stuff about Pele.

"It was never about holding the trophy up, it was about the rituals and doing those little things right so he could enjoy the game.

"He'd put a towel on his head before games and picture himself in Brazil as a young kid kicking the ball around, he'd visualise himself doing all those things he needed to do to win the game and not necessarily the end product of winning the game.

"I think Patrick has that same mindset. His mindset will be to go back to the work, making sure his body is right and making sure he has a long career and stays ahead of all the competition out there.

"He was good at whatever sport he played at school, but it shouldn't be forgotten that he put so much work in. You couldn't get him out of the gym, he would be throwing whenever he could. He just loved to play and get better.

"I know a couple of years ago the Kansas City Chiefs had to tell him to quit playing basketball, because he was out there dunking on people. If you get a ball out there he's going to compete.

"He's probably the greatest competitor I've ever been around."

Pat Mahomes may become the NFL's first $200million player but he can expect to earn double that amount in endorsements, according to a sports marketing expert.

The quarterback further enhanced his blossoming reputation by steering the Kansas City Chiefs to a first title in 50 years, with his performance in the 31-20 win over San Francisco 49ers enough to earn Super Bowl LIV MVP honours.

After a trip to Disneyworld and an open-top bus parade to celebrate the team's success, Mahomes now finds himself playing a waiting game as he looks ahead to the offseason.

A first-round pick by the Chiefs in 2017, he is moving into the last year of his rookie deal. There is no doubt that his employers will pay him; the question is more about how much he gets.

The 24-year-old is expected to sign the biggest deal in the league's history, yet the eye-catching number - whatever it ends up being in terms of overall value, and guaranteed money - is not the only chance Mahomes will have to cash in on his superstardom.

Asked if Mahomes could match his record-breaking new contract in off-field deals, Darrin Duber-Smith - a lecturer in marketing at the Metropolitan State University of Denver - told Stats Perform: "For sure.

"The thing about endorsement potential is success is only one of a few important variables in whether an endorser becomes wildly financially successful.

"Pat Mahomes is likeable. Success helps, but likeability is a bigger factor. Longevity is a big issue, attractiveness is a big issue, as is success. Those are sort of the four biggest variables for endorsement success, in my opinion.

"Tom Brady has longevity and has had success, and is good-looking too, but he doesn't have that likeability.

"Mahomes doesn't have the longevity aspect yet, of course. We don't know about that because an injury can derail someone's career very quickly.

"I would compare him to Peyton Manning, though. He even has more endorsement potential than Manning, who is one of the most likeable and also one of the highest-grossing celebrity endorsers ever."

 

While Manning is still earning in retirement, Mahomes is part of a new generation of quarterbacks. Alongside Deshaun Watson and reigning MVP Lamar Jackson, he is a superstar who will attract in sponsors, not just with his play on the field but also his personality.

His profile is aided by a change in the marketing landscape, according to Duber-Smith. Where once teams were the main attraction, now it is the players who have the pulling power.

"It's all about what we call 'star power' in the sports marketing world," he explained. "We can thank 15 or 20 years of fantasy football for that.

"Star power drives almost everything – people will go out and watch really poor teams, so long as there are one or two great stars. Teams can also make millions of dollars despite not winning for decades, just so long as the star power is there.

"The NFL has rallied this year, and I think that's down to a couple of things. First, they are paying a lot more attention to which games they are showing on television, so that really helps, but we also have 'Generation Z' coming in.

"They are different. With the millennials, we had a malaise for a period of time. Now, though, we have in this batch of new quarterbacks, probably the most exciting bunch we've possibly ever seen.

"It's all about quality. The Premier League is rated number one in the world, and the way you look at that is through player salaries. The thing about Americans is – and you're going to see this when the XFL fails – they don't like to watch poor sports.

"They like to watch the best in the world, which explains why the Premier League ratings are so much higher than our own MLS. We don't care where it comes from – if it's high quality, we will watch it."

There is little doubt about Mahomes' quality. Kansas City have drafted and developed a franchise QB who should be worth every penny of what they end up paying him. As one of the faces in the NFL, he should expect to be in high demand.

Andy Reid vowed "next year, we're coming right back here" as the Kansas City Chiefs celebrated their Super Bowl LIV triumph with a mammoth parade on Wednesday.

The Chiefs ended a 50-year wait for a title thanks to a thrilling 31-20 victory over the San Francisco 49ers, having trailed by 10 points during the fourth quarter of the game in Miami.

It marked the crowning glory in the career of popular head coach Reid, who finally won a Super Bowl ring for the first time, and he clearly has little intention of it being his only success.

Speaking in front of fans, Reid declared: "Next year we're coming right back here. One more time, baby. One more time."

The trophy for the AFC champion is named after Lamar Hunt, the father of franchise owner Clark Hunt.

Lamar Hunt died in 2006 and superstar quarterback Patrick Mahomes, who gleefully chugged beers on the bus during the journey, said that was part of the inspiration for the Chiefs.

"When I became the starter, the first thing I wanted to do was bring the Lamar Hunt Trophy back to Kansas City, back to this organisation," said Mahomes, who was named MVP for the game.

"And the second most important thing I wanted to do was bring the Vince Lombardi Trophy to the best coach in the National Football League."

Among the celebrations and shenanigans, Travis Kelce adorned a Louis Vuitton coat reportedly worth $20,000, as well as a custom-made WWE title belt strapped around his waist.

Stepping up to the microphone, Kelce bellowed out, "Can you dig it?" and screamed, "You've got to fight for your right to party" in reference to team's anthem by The Beastie Boys.

Hollywood actor and Chiefs fan Paul Rudd also got in on in the act, sharing what the result meant to him while speaking to the NFL Network.

"You get the feeling that no one else in the league is paying attention. It's a small market. Only Chiefs fans know about it," Rudd said. 

"It's the first time I've been able to say to my son, 'You can be proud of this team, you don't have to wait until next year'. It's pure elation.

"Every single year since he was seven, he cries at the end of the season. This year, he cried more than ever, but they were happy tears."

It's third-and-three in the first offensive series of Super Bowl LIV and Patrick Mahomes' pass to Damien Williams in the flat falls incomplete.

Even those with a passing interest in the NFL are not too surprised. The Kansas City Chiefs have been slow starters in these playoffs. They spotted the Houston Texans a 24-point lead in the Divisional Round and then trailed the Tennessee Titans by 10 in the AFC Championship Game.

Ethan Cooperson, a senior research analyst for the broadcast support team at Stats Perform, knows the estimated 40 million listeners tuned into Westwood One's play-by-play caller Kevin Harlan and analyst Kurt Warner desire more than just an observation that it takes Mahomes and Co. a while to get going.

On this occasion, Cooperson and the team have trawled the Stats Perform database to recognise a pattern: Kansas City have now gone three-and-out on each of their three opening drives in the playoffs having done so only twice in the regular season, when they were the NFL's best at moving the chains on third down.

It is one example of the type of data nugget that Cooperson, sat next to Harlan and Warner in the upper reaches of Miami's Hard Rock Stadium, writes down on pieces of paper to pass across to the Westwood One commentary duo throughout the 54th edition of the Super Bowl.

"You have to think quickly, think on your feet," Cooperson tells Omnisport before the game.

"You react to those things and figure out what's important, what trend is happening, what record might be broken or what might have happened that hasn't happened in a long time."

This game is a classic example. The aforementioned Kansas City running back Williams - who had fewer than 500 rushing yards in the regular season - ends up being a key part of the Chiefs' 31-20 success over the San Francisco 49ers.

Stats Perform's historical database can quickly identify Williams as the first player in Super Bowl history to have over 100 yards on the ground, a rushing touchdown and a receiving touchdown.

"People want to know, 'Well, how many times has this ever happened?'," Cooperson, who also works alongside the CBS broadcast team of Jim Nantz and Tony Romo, explains.

"People want to go deeper into those historical numbers. It's not enough anymore to be able to say, 'How many times has it happened this year?' We want to know, 'How many times has this ever happened?'"

He adds: "We're trying to look beyond what much of the media already has, digging into the Stats Perform database, the historical database, trying to find interesting trends that the public doesn't know about."

One of Cooperson's favourite recent examples was when running back Derrick Henry became just the fifth player in NFL history to score a touchdown on his birthday, doing so in Tennessee's Wild Card Round win over the New England Patriots.

Cooperson had an inkling that might happen, but it was a case of quick-thinking two weeks later when he worked out Titans tackle Dennis Kelly (321 pounds) was the heaviest man to catch a postseason touchdown in NFL history, a stat which got him a namecheck from Nantz on the air.

"I think back to when I first started doing TV with CBS in 2000 and some of the things that we got on there at that time, that we thought were really interesting and deep... Well, frankly, someone now in fourth grade could get access to some of those numbers," he says.

"So what we thought was great back then is very easy and simple to come by now.

"There's more demand, [we have to] dig deeper, find more stuff that goes deeper into the historical trends."

In the end, a rather mundane game came to life in the final quarter. The Chiefs scored the joint-most points (21) in the fourth quarter of a Super Bowl while becoming the first team in NFL history to overturn 10-point deficits in each of their three playoff wins.

Just like Mahomes and the Chiefs offense, Cooperson has to make adjustments as the game wears on.

"You don't want to get so involved in things that you have prepared or looked up prior to the game," Cooperson admits. 

"You very much want to react to what's happening."

Travis Kelce appeared more ready than superstar team-mate Patrick Mahomes to lead the Kansas City Chiefs' celebrations at their Super Bowl parade on Wednesday.

The Chiefs claimed their first title in 50 years on Sunday, Mahomes inspiring a stunning fourth-quarter turnaround to defeat the San Francisco 49ers 31-20 in Miami.

Kansas City trailed by 10 points after three quarters, but Mahomes, who had already rushed for one touchdown, threw for two scores as Andy Reid's team roared back.

Along with the usual Super Bowl rings, the Chiefs were rewarded with a custom WWE belt from wrestling executive Paul 'Triple H' Levesque.

And as the team gathered for Wednesday's celebratory parade in Kansas City, a Twitter post showed tight end Kelce wearing the belt.

The celebrations had seemingly already had an impact on Mahomes, however.

The quarterback, who has previously been mocked by team-mates for a voice described by head coach Reid as "froggish", revealed on Twitter that he was struggling ahead of the event.

He wrote: "Im go ahead and warn y'all my voice is almost gone and i already don't have a lot!"

Two people have been arrested after police halted a car that ploughed through a barrier and was heading towards the crowd at the Kansas City Chiefs Super Bowl parade on Wednesday.

Kansas City Police (KCPD) revealed nobody was injured after officers stopped the vehicle just over three hours before the Chiefs are due to tour the city following their dramatic victory over the San Francisco 49ers in Miami on Sunday.

Plumes of smoke came out of the vehicle after police used a pursuit intervention technique to dramatically end the chase.

KCPD say there are no indications of terrorist activity.

"A vehicle broke through the parade barrier on the north side of the route at 8:12am. All officers on the route were immediately alerted," a KCPD statement said.

"Clay County Sheriff's Deputies assisting KPCD deployed Stop Sticks, which the vehicle struck.

"The vehicle proceeded south down the route to where it turned at Pershing and was headed for the crowd. Multiple police cars were prepared to block it. Officers then used tactical vehicle intervention, also known as PIT manoeuvre, to stop the suspect car on Pershing.

"Police took suspects into custody. No injuries have been reported.

"The driver is under investigation for impairment. A search of the vehicle revealed no weapons, and there were no indications of terrorist activity.

"Police do not know what the suspect's motive at this time. The parade route is once again secure."

Derrick Nnadi became a Super Bowl champion with the Kansas City Chiefs on Sunday and has marked the win by stumping up the adoption fees for all of the dogs at the city's rescue centres.

The defensive tackle was part of the Chiefs team that fought back to defeat the San Francisco 49ers 31-20 in Miami.

Nnadi later revealed he would fork out the adoption fees for over 100 dogs currently available for adoption at every location of the KC Pet Project.

The 23-year-old had previously paid for a dog's adoption after every Chiefs win this season, which tallied 15 including the post-season.

The project posted on Twitter: "44 pets left the shelter today (38 dogs and 6 cats) with new families and up to 30 more are going home tomorrow! Of the 109 dogs that qualified for the sponsorship, around 40-50 of those dogs will still be available after tomorrow, which is incredible. Thank you @DerrickNnadi."

Nnadi replied to that post saying "wonderful" and previously wrote it was "the perfect way to cap off this great season".

The Chiefs trailed by 10 heading into the fourth quarter at Hard Rock Stadium before putting on 21 unanswered points to stun the 49ers. 

Patrick Mahomes will allow others to worry about his contract negotiations amid reports the Super Bowl LIV MVP could earn a record-breaking $200million extension.

The Kansas City Chiefs quarterback led his franchise to their first Lombardi Trophy in 50 years in Miami on Sunday, guiding Andy Reid's team to a 31-20 victory over the San Francisco 49ers thanks to two late touchdown passes at Hard Rock Stadium.

In becoming the youngest man to ever win the league MVP and Super Bowl MVP awards in his career, Mahomes is viewed as the future of the NFL, a point his team will be making when they get down to talking money with the Chiefs.

Mahomes will enter the final year of his $16.42m rookie deal next season and though Kansas City have the right to exercise the fifth-year option, they could thrash out a long-term contract this offseason.

"That's stuff that's handled with other people," Mahomes said on Monday, where he addressed the press before making the customary MVP visit to Disney World.

"Obviously, I want to be in Kansas City for a long time. I understand that and also I want to win a lot of football games here.

"For me, it's kind of letting that stuff handle itself. I'm in a great organisation.

"I have a great team of guys working for me, guys and girls.

"For me, it's about trusting those people and finding the best way to do it in order to have the best team around me."

The biggest overall contract in the NFL was the five-year, $150m deal Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan signed last May.

Aged 61, Kansas City's Reid may be 37 years older than Mahomes, but he is not thinking of calling it a day after finally winning his first ring as a head coach.

"I still enjoy doing what I'm doing," said Reid, who revealed he did not sleep with the Lombardi Trophy on Sunday evening and instead spent it listening to Pitbull.

"I got this young quarterback over here that makes life easy every day. Every day it's a pleasure to come to work and know that you have an opportunity to coach him and his team-mates.

"[General manager] Brett Veach understands what it takes to win but also the kind of people that we enjoy working with, so he brings those kind of guys in and makes it enjoyable."

The future is certainly bright for the Kansas City Chiefs after they were crowned Super Bowl LIV champions on Sunday.

A 31-20 victory over the San Francisco 49ers at Miami's Hard Rock Stadium earned veteran Andy Reid his first ring as head coach, while quarterback Patrick Mahomes became the youngest player to be named both MVP - an honour he won a year ago - and Super Bowl MVP in NFL history.

With Mahomes just 24, the Chiefs will have aspirations of dominating for the foreseeable future and replicating the two dynasties the New England Patriots and Tom Brady enjoyed with six Lombardi Trophies across two decades.

However, winning back-to-back Super Bowls is no mean feat - no team has done it since the Patriots 16 years ago - so we take a look at which teams could prevent Kansas City from winning it all again in Tampa Bay next February.

BALTIMORE RAVENS

The best team in the NFL's regular season fell at the first hurdle in the playoffs as the 14-2 Ravens were upset at home by the Tennessee Titans.

That was a deflating note to end on for quarterback Lamar Jackson, who was voted the NFL's MVP by unanimous vote 24 hours before Mahomes won his first ring.

Jackson is just 23, most of the Ravens' star players are expected to return and coordinators Greg Roman and Wink Martindale will likely be back alongside Coach of the Year John Harbaugh.

If Jackson is able to replicate or even exceed what he did in his first full year as the starter, the Ravens might be bound for Tampa next year.

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

Long live the kings? Don't count on it.

The 2019 season felt like the end of an era as Father Time looked he had finally caught up with 42-year-old quarterback Brady.

Yet those who have written off New England in the past have often ended up looking incredibly foolish.

The Patriots have 19 straight winning seasons, the best head coach in the game in Bill Belichick and had the NFL's number one defense in 2019. Brady's future remains uncertain but one final push for a Lombardi is certainly not beyond the realms of possibility.

 

NEW ORLEANS SAINTS

The nearly men of the past three seasons; Saints fans have been crushed by a trio of playoff defeats featuring walk-off plays.

New Orleans will believe they will be playing January football again after three straight seasons with double-digit wins.

Sean Payton remains one of the preeminent offensive minds, Michael Thomas broke the single-season record for receptions in 2019 and an underrated defense complements a free-scoring offense.

At 41, Drew Brees' career is coming to an end, but, presuming he decides to return next season, the Saints will surely be contending again.

 

PITTSBURGH STEELERS

The Steelers only went 8-8 in 2019 but San Francisco's transformation from 4-12 to 13-3 and a Super Bowl berth is evidence of how the NFL can quickly turn on its head.

What should give Steelers fans cause for optimism is that they won eight games without their starting quarterback, Ben Roethlisberger.

Roethlisberger was still playing at an elite level prior to his 2019 season-ending injury, leading the league in passing yardage with a career high 5,129 yards in 2018.

Combine that with an impressive young defense and a head coach tried and tested in the postseason and you have the recipe for another Super Bowl run.

ARIZONA CARDINALS

A left-field suggestion, sure, but look at the significant strides both Mahomes and Jackson took in their second years in the league.

Offensive Rookie of the Year Kyler Murray believes he can make a similar leap in 2020 and, if he can, look out.

Arizona's offense under rookie head coach Kliff Kingsbury hummed at times in going 5-10-1 in 2019 and the addition of more weapons in free agency would significantly aid Murray's development.

Their biggest problem, beyond fixing a porous defense, is finding a way to come out on top in a division that contains the NFC's last two Super Bowl representatives - the 49ers and Los Angeles Rams - as well as postseason regulars the Seattle Seahawks.

Andy Reid was craving a "double cheeseburger with extra cheese" after ending his long wait for a Super Bowl title as a head coach on Sunday.

His Kansas City Chiefs team beat the San Francisco 49ers 31-20 in Miami's Hard Rock Stadium to capture the franchise's second Super Bowl, and their first in 50 years.

No head coach had won as many games as Reid without winning a Super Bowl title, yet his 222nd victory across the regular season and playoffs finally delivered a ring.

Asked how he planned to celebrate, Reid said: "Well, I joked about it but I'm going to have a double cheeseburger tonight, with extra cheese!

"I'm going to enjoy it with my family and the team, that's what I'm going to do. That's exciting."

The 61-year-old almost certainly secured his place in the Pro Football Hall of Fame with the victory.

Yet Reid, who lost a Super Bowl when head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles, said he was uninterested in what impact the win would have on his legacy.

"You know, I don't care about that, man, I really don't," he insisted.

"This is a pure team sport, I love that part of it, that's why I got in it - I didn't get in it for any other reason than to win games and to win them with great people.

"And so we bust our tail to do that as players and coaches, that's the part that I think needs respect.

"You take care of that and everything else happens and the other stuff? That's not really where my mind goes. It really is the last thing on my mind."

One thing that will be on Reid and his Chiefs players' minds soon will be whether to accept the customary White House invitation for the Super Bowl champions.

In previous years some players and even entire teams have swerved the visit due to their opinion of current White House tenant, US President Donald Trump.

Reid, though, intends to attend if invited.

"I haven't even thought about that. [but] I'll be there," he said.

"They're inviting us, I'll be there. It's quite an honour, I think."

Patrick Mahomes believes his Kansas City Chiefs head coach Andy Reid should be considered one of the greatest tacticians in NFL history after their team's Super Bowl victory.

The Chiefs' 31-20 victory over the San Francisco 49ers in Miami was Reid's 222th across the regular season and playoffs, and it ended his long wait for a Lombardi Trophy as a head coach.

Mahomes, named the game's MVP, was instrumental, rushing for a first-quarter touchdown and then throwing two late scores as the Chiefs overturned a 10-point deficit midway through the fourth quarter.

"I had two goals when I became the starting quarterback for the Kansas City Chiefs," Mahomes explained in his MVP news conference.

"The first goal was to win the Lamar Hunt Trophy [AFC Championship]. I wanted to bring it home, the one that has our founder's name on it. I wanted to bring it to this family and this organisation.

"And the second most important thing was to get coach Reid a Super Bowl trophy. He's one of the greatest coaches of all time.

"I don't think he needed the Lombardi Trophy to prove that. But just to do that, it puts all doubt aside, and he's going to be listed as one of the all-time great coaches in history whenever he wants to be done, which I hope is not any time soon."

Mahomes, who finished with 286 passing yards, two touchdowns and a pair of picks, became the youngest player to ever win the NFL MVP award – which he did last season – and claim a Super Bowl ring.

Given their quarterback is only 24, the Chiefs could dominate the NFL for the foreseeable future in the same way the New England Patriots and Tom Brady have in winning six titles over the past two decades.

"It's pretty amazing, the dynasty or whatever you want to call it the Patriots have had these last 15 or 20 years," Mahomes admitted.

"So for me it's about taking it one year at a time. We came up short last year. We understood how hard of a challenge it was to get to this position again and we found a way to do it.

"We understand next year that when we come back it's going to be the same amount of tenacity and dedication every single day if we want to be here.

"I think we just take it one year at a time, one day at a time and try to put together great years, and then at the end of it all we will have no regrets on where we are at."

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo rued being unable to produce a game-winning drive in Super Bowl LIV as the Kansas City Chiefs emerged victorious 31-20 in Miami.

The Niners threw away a 10-point lead midway through the fourth quarter, Patrick Mahomes throwing touchdown passes to Travis Kelce and Damien Williams to put the Chiefs ahead.

Garoppolo got the ball back with 2:39 to go on the San Francisco 15 with the Niners four points down, and a touchdown drive would surely have quelled the doubters who believe he is not a franchise quarterback.

However, Garoppolo could only get his team to midfield, missing Emmanuel Sanders on a long-third down throw and then being sacked on fourth down.

Williams ran in another score to put the result to bed and Garoppolo threw a second pick to Kendall Fuller in a game where he finished 20-of-31 passing for 219 yards, one touchdown and two interceptions.

Asked about being unable to deliver a game-winning moment, Garoppolo replied: "Those are the moments you dream of and everything.

"We got rolling on a right note and just couldn't finish it off. 

"It is tough but it's been a hell of a year with these guys. Everything we have been through from the start, it's an incredible story."

Garoppolo was a two-time Super Bowl winner as Tom Brady's backup with the New England Patriots, but this time he was on the losing side as the starter in San Francisco.

"It's tough, I mean, I've never had this feeling before," he said.

"Kind of an unreal feeling."

San Francisco, and their swarming defense, had appeared in control of the contest before Mahomes delivered some fourth-quarter magic.

Tight end George Kittle, who finished with four catches for 36 yards, added: "It's pretty brutal.

"It just honestly sucks. It's not really anything you can wrap your head around. I feel like I wish I had another half to play, but I don't.

"We didn't take advantage of our opportunities. I wish we had another page in the book. We just didn't get it done."

Kansas City Chiefs owner Clark Hunt said "nobody deserves this trophy more than Andy Reid" after the veteran head coach claimed his first Super Bowl title.

After 222 wins and 21 years as a head coach, Reid ended his drought for a Lombardi Trophy following Sunday's come-from-behind 31-20 win over the San Francisco 49ers.

Reid was the winningest coach in the NFL without a Super Bowl ring until the Chiefs overturned a 10-point deficit inside the final seven minutes against the 49ers.

Celebrating Kansas City's first Super Bowl success in 50 years, Hunt hailed Reid – who joined the Chiefs in 2013 after 14 years with the Philadelphia Eagles, where he lost to the New England Patriots in the 2005 showpiece.

"It's a beautiful trophy and I can't think of a better conclusion to the 100th season of the NFL than receiving this trophy," Hunt said during the trophy presentation.

"I'm so happy for our players, coaches and our fans. And especially Andy Reid. Nobody deserves this trophy more than Andy Reid.

"I want to thank the lord for blessing our family with all these incredible people, who helped bring these championship home.

"To the Chiefs kingdom, you guys are world champions once again."

Travis Kelce knew the Kansas City Chiefs were not going to be stopped as the NFL franchise claimed their second Super Bowl title and first in 50 years.

Not since the 1969 season had the Chiefs won the Super Bowl but Kansas City ended that drought on Sunday, hoisting the Lombardi Trophy thanks to a 31-20 win over the San Francisco 49ers.

The Chiefs overturned a 10-point deficit inside the final seven minutes in Miami, where tight end Kelce and Kansas City denied the 49ers a record-equalling sixth championship.

Led by star quarterback and Super Bowl MVP Patrick Mahomes, five-time Pro Bowler Kelce had no doubt in his mind that the Chiefs would reign supreme at Hard Rock Stadium.

"It was a mindset," Kelce told ESPN. "I could look at every guy in the huddle and I knew we all had one goal in mind. I knew we wouldn't be stopped, that is the greatest feeling in the world, knowing you can't be stopped.

"Hopefully we have all these guys coming back next year, because it's exciting."

"They came out and played exactly how we thought they would. A little bit more shell coverage, takes us longer to develop routes," Kelce added.

"But it was Pat Mahomes being Pat Mahomes, staying composed in the pocket, trying to throw a few in there. We have all the faith in the world in him."

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