David Warner became the fastest to 5,000 Indian Premier League runs but Sunrisers Hyderabad lost again, this time to Kolkata Knight Riders in a Super Over. 

Batting in the unusual position of four in the order, Warner made an unbeaten 47 off 33 balls as Sunrisers managed to get 17 runs off the final over to level the scores. 

However, the left-hander was bowled at the start of the Super Over by the excellent Lockie Ferguson, who then cleaned up Abdul Samad two balls later. 

Left needing just three to win off leg-spinner Rashid Khan, Kolkata captain Eoin Morgan combined with the man he recently replaced in the job, Dinesh Karthik, to complete the job, the pair having earlier made 34 and 29 not out respectively. 

Shubman Gill top-scored with 36 as five of the Knight Riders' top six reached double figures, Andre Russell the only exception as they finished on 163-5. 

The West Indies all-rounder then suffered an apparent hamstring injury in the field, though he returned to bowl the final over with Hyderabad needing 18. 

They appeared on course to reach their target when the equation was reduced down to two from the final ball, but Warner had to settle for a tie as they scampered through for a leg bye. 

WARNER JOINS ILLUSTRIOUS CLUB

Warner is the fourth batsman to reach 5,000 runs in the Twenty20 tournament, though the first overseas player to achieve the feat. 

The Australian joins Virat Kohli, Rohit Sharma and Suresh Raina in the illustrious club. Worryingly, though, his Sunrisers team are on the slide as the season reaches a critical stage, this their fourth loss in five games. They are now four points behind fourth-placed Kolkata in the table.

LOCKIE THE KEY TO VICTORY

Playing his first game in this year's IPL, Lockie Ferguson showed the value of pace as he picked up five wickets in the match - including two in a Super Over for Hyderabad that did not last long.

He had also claimed 3-15 in the Sunrisers' innings, dismissing fellow New Zealander Kane Williamson, who replaced Warner as opener and, despite an obvious injury, made 29.

David Warner became the fastest to 5,000 Indian Premier League runs but Sunrisers Hyderabad lost again, this time to Kolkata Knight Riders in a Super Over. 

Batting in the unusual position of four in the order, Warner made an unbeaten 47 off 33 balls as Sunrisers managed to get 17 runs off the final over to level the scores. 

However, the left-hander was bowled at the start of the Super Over by the excellent Lockie Ferguson, who then cleaned up Abdul Samad two balls later. 

Left needing just three to win off leg-spinner Rashid Khan, Kolkata captain Eoin Morgan combined with the man he recently replaced in the job, Dinesh Karthik, to complete the job, the pair having earlier made 34 and 29 not out respectively. 

Shubman Gill top-scored with 36 as five of the Knight Riders' top six reached double figures, Andre Russell the only exception as they finished on 163-5. 

The West Indies all-rounder then suffered an apparent hamstring injury in the field, though he returned to bowl the final over with Hyderabad needing 18. 

They appeared on course to reach their target when the equation was reduced down to two from the final ball, but Warner had to settle for a tie as they scampered through for a leg bye. 

WARNER JOINS ILLUSTRIOUS CLUB

Warner is the fourth batsman to reach 5,000 runs in the Twenty20 tournament, though the first overseas player to achieve the feat. 

The Australian joins Virat Kohli, Rohit Sharma and Suresh Raina in the illustrious club. Worryingly, though, his Sunrisers team are on the slide as the season reaches a critical stage, this their fourth loss in five games. They are now four points behind fourth-placed Kolkata in the table.

LOCKIE THE KEY TO VICTORY

Playing his first game in this year's IPL, Lockie Ferguson showed the value of pace as he picked up five wickets in the match - including two in a Super Over for Hyderabad that did not last long.

He had also claimed 3-15 in the Sunrisers' innings, dismissing fellow New Zealander Kane Williamson, who replaced Warner as opener and, despite an obvious injury, made 29.

When Pakistan were previously in England for a Test series, Babar Azam saw a promising start cut short by a bad break.  

The batsman made a half-century in the opening game at Lord’s in May 2018, but his involvement in the series was painfully cut short when struck on the left arm by a Ben Stokes short ball.  

Forced to retire hurt with 68 to his name, Babar did not appear again during the tour. A fracture ended his contribution as the tourists triumphed at the home of cricket, while he had to watch on as his side were crushed in the second Test at Headingley. 

At that stage of his career, Babar was viewed as a limited-overs specialist still making his way in the Test arena. With an average under 25 prior to playing England, he was – at the age of 23 – a player with obvious potential working out how to play the game of patience.

Just over two years on, he returns to England having enhanced his reputation to such an extent that the so-called 'Fab Four' - Virat Kohli, Joe Root, Steve Smith and Kane Williamson - have company. It is unclear who identifies as the cricketing versions of Paul, John, Ringo and George, but Babar is not like the fifth Beatle – his identity is clear.

Start a discussion with cricket fans over who should be considered the lead act in the group and you are opening a cricketing can of worms. It is a topic that, understandably, stirs up national pride, but also heated discussions about the weight of importance given to each format. 

What is not up for debate, however, is that Babar deserves to be in the conversation. His white-ball numbers are outstanding – he averages over 50 in Twenty20 and one-dayers for Pakistan – yet his Test statistics in recent times provide additional evidence for those keen to argue his case.  

Indeed, his average of 75.9 across his 12 Test knocks since the start of 2019 is the best rate of any batsman to have 10 or more innings during that period. Better than Kohli, despite the India captain piling on the runs at home against South Africa, including a career-best 254 not out. Better even than Smith, whose Ashes heroics last year were so crucial in helping Australia retain the urn on English soil.  

He also sits above the same pairing when it comes to contributing for his team, providing an astonishing 22 per cent of Pakistan’s total Test runs over the period. There is clearly substance to the style now, a determined streak to go with the eye-catching technique.  

Ricky Ponting, the former Australia captain, tipped Babar to become one of the best in the world at the start of the year; he was a little late to get on board a bandwagon that now offers standing room only. 

"I think he is right up there already," Azhar Ali, Pakistan's Test skipper, said on the eve of the series opener with England at Old Trafford. 

"His performances have improved massively in Test matches over the last year or so. Firstly, he was performing really well in white-ball cricket and people thought he was only a white-ball player, but he took on that challenge and played with a lot of freedom and flair.” 

Babar's career totals do not stand up to the sheer volume scored by Kohli, Root, Smith and Williamson - at least not yet. Still, since 2018, he sits above the quartet in terms of Test average (65.5) and strike-rate (63.2 runs per 100 deliveries).

That stretch includes a memorable maiden hundred on home soil. While rain ruined the spectacle of the first Test played in Pakistan for over a decade, Babar brightened up the final day against Sri Lanka in Rawalpindi with an unbeaten 102 that delighted the crowd who had patiently waited to see their team return.  

Scores of 60 not out, 100 and 143 followed in the remainder of a truncated series, all from a player who did not reach three figures until his 17th Test. 

Prior to that breakthrough innings against New Zealand in November 2018, Babar had managed an unspectacular 822 runs at 30.4. Since then, though, there have been four more three-figure scores in 10 games, plus a 97 in a losing cause against Australia in Adelaide when no colleagues were willing to stick around in support. 

Pakistan are likely to lean on him heavily again in England, particularly as they come up against a team brimming with fast-bowling options and fresh off a 2-1 series victory over West Indies. 

Babar's development - including a highly productive Cricket World Cup campaign last year on English soil, as well as finishing top run-scorer in the T20 Blast while playing for Somerset - suggests he will relish the challenge.

The head-to-head battle with Root will be one of the main storylines, too. England's captain has much on his plate in the coming weeks, including fathoming out a way to nullify the brilliant Babar, who has stylishly climbed his way into the top tier of international batsmen.

The wicket of Kane Williamson is among the most prized in all of cricket, simple because he takes care of it so well. Not taking a chance against the New Zealand captain is probably the biggest mistake any opposition can make. Once Williamson is at the crease, New Zealand is likely to be a difficult prospect to beat.

What is worse, is if Williamson has scored some runs before he plays against your team. That is problematic because he scores runs in bunches, like he did in the 2018 edition of the Indian Premier League (IPL) where he donned the Orange Cap, having scored 735 runs on the season. That was the season when Williamson was first announced as captain of Sunriser’s Hyderabad, a team he led to the IPL final where they were defeated by the Chennai Super Kings. And that has been the trend with Williamson, his performances improve with mounting responsibilities.

A stroke player, rather than a 'muscler' of the cricket ball, Williamson had to learn to play in the shortest format of the game, but he has. He was bought by Sunrisers for US$96,000 in 2015, winning the title the following year. He was one of the retained players in 2017, but by 2018, his value as a T20 batsman had soared, and it cost Sunrisers US$460,500 to keep him.  

 

Career Statistics (2009-present)

Full name: Kane Stuart Williamson

Born: August 8, 1990, Tauranga (29)

Major teams: New Zealand, Barbados Tridents, Edmonton Royals, Gloucestershire, Gloucestershire 2nd XI, New Zealand A, New Zealand Cricket XI, New Zealand Emerging Players, New Zealand Under-19s, New Zealand Under-19s, New Zealand XI, Northern Districts, Sunrisers Hyderabad, Yorkshire

Playing role: Top-order batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm offbreak

 

T20I Career

Mat   Inns   NO    Runs         HS     Ave    BF         SR     100   50         4s     6s     Ct         St

60    58    7      1665         95    32.64         1330         125.18      0         11    170   36         27    0

T20 Career

Mat   Inns   NO    Runs         HS     Ave    BF         SR     100   50         4s     6s     Ct         St

181   173   21    4593         101* 30.21         3681         124.77      1         31    430   115         71    0  

 

Career Highlights

  • T20I caps for New Zealand (60)
  • 5th most T20I runs by a Kiwi (1665)
  • Averages 32.64 in T20Is
  • 4593 T20 runs at 30.21 average
  • IPL 2018 orange cap winner (735 runs)

Gary Stead has dismissed talk of a rift between himself and Kane Williamson and the New Zealand head coach revealed he has held positive talks over a new contract.

It has been reported that the relationship between Stead and Black Caps captain Williamson has deteriorated, with speculation that the head coach wanted Tom Latham to take over as Test skipper.

Stead denied that was the case back in May and although he says there is "positive conflict" between the two, the 48-year-old insisted they have no problem working together.

He told Stuff: "Kane and I have a really strong relationship, and we spoke about it.

"There was no basis in truth and the disappointing part is it's coming from somewhere and someone, but it's not Kane and it's not I.

"I really enjoy working with Kane. The discussions we have are robust and always directed at what's best for the team, which is something I know we are truly aligned on.

"It's like any business, you always have positive conflict and if there wasn't, then I'd be worried."

Stead is nearing the end of the two-year deal he signed to replace Mike Hesson, but hopes to extend his tenure.

"Talks have been pretty positive and, if New Zealand Cricket and the players feel as though I can keep contributing then I'd be interested in continuing on," he added.

New Zealand have not played since March due to the coronavirus pandemic and are not due to be in action until hosting West Indies in a Test series in November, subject to government approval.

Virat Kohli lamented India's batting after their Test series loss to New Zealand, while paying tribute to the Black Caps.

New Zealand wrapped up a 2-0 series win over India on Monday thanks to a seven-wicket victory in Christchurch.

India struggled with the bat throughout the series, posting scores of 165 and 191 in the first Test in Wellington and 242 and 124 at Hagley Oval.

Kohli praised New Zealand's bowlers and rued his side's batting after their series defeat.

"It was a matter of not having enough intent in the first game and then playing well in the first innings here but then again the small things, small margins," the India captain told Sky Sport.

"When you sit down and look back at this series you have to also give credit to the New Zealand bowlers because they bowled in the right areas for long enough, created a lot of pressure. There were hardly any scoring opportunities so that meant you had to play extravagant shots to get runs rather than just rotating strike and getting runs easily.

"It was a combination of us not quite having the right kind of execution and New Zealand playing really well in their conditions and I think the bowling and the consistency was outstanding and that's something that forced our batting to make those mistakes.

"We're usually a batting side that does show a bit of fight and put up scores on the board, but there was just not enough done by the batsmen in the series for the bowlers to try and attack."

After ripping through the India lower-order to begin day three in Christchurch, New Zealand were untroubled on the way to their target of 132 for victory.

Black Caps captain Kane Williamson was happy with his team and said their ability to combine for small but vital partnerships was crucial.

"Outstanding," he said. "Both fairly sporting surfaces where bowlers had to put the ball in the right area, but if you did you created opportunities throughout every day of this game which was surprising. History suggests that it does a bit initially and then flattens out.

"I guess therein lies the value in a lot of those partnerships that we had with the bat, those 30s and 40s that were huge out there on that surface.

"I don't think the end result reflected how perhaps tight that match was because as we saw in both innings the ball going past the outside of the bat and it is such a fine line, but a fantastic series from our side in terms of the balance with the bat and the ball and the way the guys stuck at it.

"As we know, it is a fine line and India are a world-class side, top of the comp [ICC World Test Championship], so a great effort from the guys."

Kyle Jamieson's maiden Test five-for triggered an India collapse as New Zealand made a strong start to the second and final Test on Saturday.

Jamieson tore through India, who went from 194-5 to 242 all out in a remarkable tea session on day one in Christchurch, with figures of 5-45 in 14 overs.

New Zealand reached stumps at 63-0, trailing by 179 runs, thanks to openers Tom Lathan (27 not out) and Tom Blundell (29 not out) at Hagley Oval.

Rain delayed the start of play in New Zealand, where ICC's top-ranked Test side India were looking to bounce back from their crushing defeat against the Black Caps in Wellington.

New Zealand captain Kane Williamson won the toss and opted to bowl first, and it proved a wise decision when Trent Boult (2-89) trapped Mayank Agarwal lbw for seven after India made it through six overs unscathed.

The Black Caps' bowling attack did not have it all their own way – highly rated opener Prithvi Shaw showing intent early on as he kept the scoreboard ticking over.

Shaw scored 54 runs from just 64 deliveries before he fell victim to Jamieson – who claimed 4-39 in the first innings of the opening Test against India on his debut – prior to lunch, Latham's stunning catch at second slip ending a promising knock.

Tim Southee (2-38) then took the prized scalp of struggling India skipper Virat Kohli (3) shortly after lunch as the tourists fell to 85-3.

Only two other wickets fell in the middle session – Ajinkya Rahane (7) and Hanuma Vihari (55) via Southee and Neil Wagner (1-29) – as India looked relatively comfortable heading into the tea break.

But it all fell apart for India in the final session as Jamieson cleaned up the visitors with four wickets in a stunning spell, which saw Kohli's side crumble for 48-5.

Cheteshwar Pujara (54), Rishabh Pant (12), Umesh Yadav (0) and Ravindra Jadeja (9) were dismissed by Jamieson, while Boult ripped out Mohammed Shami's off stump.

Latham and Blundell then saw New Zealand through to the end of play without loss amid fading light after 23 overs.

Virat Kohli lamented India's uncompetitiveness with the bat in the first innings of their comprehensive Test loss to New Zealand.

The Black Caps secured their 100th Test victory on Monday, beating India by 10 wickets in Wellington in the series opener.

India were bowled out for 165 in the first innings and 191 in the second and Kohli rued their initial effort at the Basin Reserve.

"It was probably the toss that turned out to be very important, but at the same time as a batting unit I think we take a lot of pride in being competitive and we were just not competitive enough," India captain Kohli told Sky Sport.

"I don't think we put their bowlers under enough pressure in the first innings. Anything over 220-230 then you're talking a different language and even the deficit looks much lesser if you get that score on the board and you get the last three batsmen out cheaper, which wasn't the case.

"But I think that first innings really put us behind in the game already and then that lead obviously put us under a lot of pressure which was hard to come back from."

India had New Zealand at 225-7 in their first innings, only for Kyle Jamieson (44), Colin de Grandhomme (43) and Trent Boult (38) to push the hosts to 348.

Black Caps captain Kane Williamson was delighted with the victory, with Tim Southee grabbing a five-for in the second innings.

"It was an outstanding effort over the space of four days and we know how strong this Indian team is all around the world," he said.

"The efforts that went into that first innings to put the ball in the right area for long periods of time and I think that with the bat to get what was a very competitive total on a surface that I thought was a really good one that offered throughout the whole match, and the lower-order runs are really important to try and get a little bit of a lead.

"As we saw that if you did pick up a wicket you could get a couple so an outstanding all-round team effort."

The second and final Test starts in Christchurch on Saturday.

Tim Southee pointed to Rishabh Pant's run out as the moment New Zealand took control of the first Test against India at Basin Reserve.

Pant signalled his intent with a six in the first over of the second day, but a dreadful mix-up with Ajinkya Rahane left him high and dry, albeit a superb direct hit from Ajax Patel played its part.

India lost five wickets for just 43 runs to crumble to 165 all out before lunch, and Kane Williamson's 89 was influential in New Zealand posting 216-5 at the close of day two for a lead of 51.

"I think the run out of Pant was a big play this morning," said Southee, who was bowling at the time and finished with 4-49.

"With him being such a dangerous player, especially leading into the second new ball, he could score really quickly along with Jinks [Rahane].

"We knew that once we could open up an end and face the bowlers, Jinks would look to play a bit more aggressively and that brings you into a play a bit more.

"I think the way we bowled this morning was pretty good."

Williamson fell short of what would have been a welcome century after a difficult time in the 3-0 series defeat to Australia.

But the captain's stand of 93 with Ross Taylor (44) – playing his 100th Test – put the Black Caps in a promising position that Southee hopes the hosts can build on.

"You always want your best players to be at the crease. They [Williamson and Taylor] put on a great partnership, both looking nice for a long period of time," he added. 

"If we can carry on and keep chipping away with the guys to come then it will set us up."

India fought back late in the day with three wickets in the final session and Ishant Sharma's (3-31) performance was particularly important.

Sharma arrived late in New Zealand due to his recovery from a torn ankle ligament and he has been coping with jet lag.

Southee paid tribute to the right-arm quick, saying: "He's been a word class bowler for a long time.

"When you're slightly underdone in terms of preparation and having an injury coming into the series, you can call on previous experience.

"He has played 90-odd Test matches and he knows what he needs to do to get himself right for a Test match, and when the preparation isn't ideal, he is able to find ways to perform like he has."

Kane Williamson fell short of a century as New Zealand earned a 51-run lead but India struck back with late wickets on day two of the opening Test.

New Zealand captain Williamson scored 89 runs to help the Black Caps to 216-5 against touring India at stumps in Wellington on Saturday.

But India claimed three wickets during the final session – including the scalp of Williamson – to regain some ground before bad light stopped play after New Zealand threatened to surge clear.

The opening day at Basin Reserve was ended by rain on Friday, with India reduced to 122-5 through just 55 overs due to wet weather.

New Zealand debutant Kyle Jamieson (4-39) starred on day one and he was among the wickets again as India were bowled out for 165 before lunch on Saturday – Virat Kohli's visitors losing 43-5.

Rishabh Pant (19) and Ajinkya Rahane (46) returned to the crease attempting to revive India's flagging innings but an awful mix-up and a stunning piece of fielding from Ajax Patel sparked the Black Caps.

Pant was left high and dry following Patel's direct hit and the wickets kept tumbling for India as New Zealand paceman Tim Southee took centre stage with figures of 4-49.

Southee dismissed Ravichandran Ashwin (0) first ball and then secured the prized wicket of Rahane before sending Mohammed Shami back to the pavilion for 21, while Jamieson had Ishant Sharma (5) caught behind.

The Black Caps navigated a tricky period prior to lunch with the bat, but opener Tom Latham (11) soon fell victim to Sharma (3-31) and the latter then skittled Tom Blundell (30) to leave New Zealand 73-2.

Williamson and Ross Taylor, however, combined for a valuable 93-run partnership to lead the hosts to 166-3 before Sharma removed Taylor just six runs shy of a half-century.

Black Caps skipper Williamson, who posted his 32nd Test fifty, was 11 runs short of another ton after slicing a Shami (1-61) delivery to substitute fielder Ravindra Jadeja.

One more wicket fell as stumps approached, Henry Nicholls sent packing by Ashwin (1-60) as BJ Watling (14 not out) and Colin de Grandhomme (4 not out) ended the day unbeaten in the middle.

Kane Williamson praised the way New Zealand handled the pressure after his depleted side completed an ODI series sweep over India with a five-wicket win at the Bay Oval.

The Black Caps' attack – minus Trent Boult and Lockie Ferguson, as well as Matt Henry and Adam Milne – restricted India to 296-7 in the third and final game, despite a century from KL Rahul.

Martin Guptill (66) and Henry Nicholls (80) gave the hosts a sound platform in their reply, sharing an opening stand of 106, and despite a mid-innings wobble, Colin de Grandhomme smashed an unbeaten 58 to see his team home with 17 balls to spare.

Captain Williamson was particularly pleased with the way New Zealand fought hard with the ball, Hamish Bennett claiming 4-64, to restrict their opponents, India having at one stage reached 162-3 during the 31st over.

"As you know on some of these surfaces with some short boundaries, the job of the bowlers is so important," Williamson said during the post-match press conference. "They also operated nicely in partnerships and we were able to hold our nerve in key moments.

"Today was a great example. Once again, we were put under pressure by India, but we were able to have a really good death phase, which helped us keep India to about a par total.

"A lot of positives in different areas, so it's an opportunity to build on this series and keep moving forward as an ODI side."

Opposite number Virat Kohli admitted India had been second best throughout the 50-over games, a dramatic reversal after they had won 5-0 in the Twenty20 series.

"With the ball we were not able to make enough breakthroughs. And in the field as well, we were not good at all," Kohli said at the presentation ceremony.

"We didn't deserve to be on the winning side at all in the series. [We] haven't played so badly, but if you don't grab your chances at this level then teams are going to hurt you."

The focus for both nations now turns to Test cricket, with a two-match series beginning at the Basin Reserve in Wellington on February 21.

Williamson was able to provide a positive update on injured duo Boult and Ferguson, saying: "[I'm] Expecting all of those guys to be fit for the first Test and they're all tracking nicely."

New Zealand captain Kane Williamson will miss the opening two games in the ODI series against India due to a shoulder injury.

Williamson continues to battle an inflamed AC joint in his left shoulder suffered during the third Twenty20 of the five-game series, which India swept 5-0.

The star batsman is still dealing with the injury, leading to the Black Caps calling up Mark Chapman – who has played five 50-over matches for New Zealand – to the squad.

"Kane has had an X-ray scan which cleared him of anything serious, but it's best for his recovery that he avoids aggravating the joint for the next few days," Black Caps team physio Vijay Vallabh said in a statement on Tuesday.

"He will continue his fitness training sessions throughout the week and will start batting again on Friday with the prospect of being available for game three next Tuesday."

Tom Latham will captain New Zealand, with the opening game of the series set for Hamilton on Wednesday.

Chapman, meanwhile, has scored 160 ODI runs at an average of 40, although most of those came against the United Arab Emirates in 2015 before he struggled against England two years ago.

"It's disappointing for Kane, but with so much important cricket still ahead this summer we must take a safety first approach," New Zealand selector Gavin Larsen said.

"It's great to welcome Mark back into the one-day unit off the back of consecutive centuries for New Zealand A against a strong India A side.

"Mark's a versatile player who can cover multiple batting positions and his fielding is a real upshot to have in the squad."

Virat Kohli urged New Zealand to keep Kane Williamson as captain after India swept their T20 international series on Sunday.

Rohit Sharma's 60 and Jasprit Bumrah's brilliant bowling condemned the Black Caps to a seven-run loss at Bay Oval and a sobering 5-0 series defeat, which included two Super Over failures and a string of batting collapses.

New Zealand have now lost eight successive games across all formats, inviting more questions for Williamson after he said he was "open" to a change in leadership following the underwhelming Test tour of Australia.

The 29-year-old, still resting his injured shoulder, was seen speaking with Kohli along the Bay Oval boundary as both batsmen skipped the dead rubber.

The discussion seemed to have a profound effect on the India star, who gave his counterpart a resounding vote of confidence.

"We get along well, we've known each other for a while," Kohli told Sky Sport NZ.

"It's amazing to know that in different parts of the world you're thinking the same things, you're talking the same language and you're headed in the right direction.

"Although the scoreline looks very different for New Zealand, I truly believe New Zealand cricket is in the best hands with Kane and he is the right guy to lead this team and lay out that vision for them, which he has in the past as well.

"Results can't always determine your leadership, but he is the right man and I truly believe that, because I spoke to him today and the way he thinks about life and the game - he's just the perfect, perfect man to lead the side.

"I wish them all the luck and all the power to come back stronger. They're a side everyone loves to watch and play against as well. We just had a very nice conversation and [it's] something that I'll remember."

Tim Southee, New Zealand skipper in Williamson's absence, felt the 5-0 series hammering was unfair on the Black Caps.

"I don't think it's a massive gap," Southee said. "I know the series scoreline suggests that, but I think with the games being reasonably close it's just about doing those small things a little bit better."

The teams have two days to rest before meeting in the first of three ODIs at Seddon Park on Wednesday.

Rohit Sharma smashed back-to-back sixes to inflict more Super Over misery on New Zealand as India snatched a Twenty20 International series-clinching victory in a Seddon Park thriller.

The Blacks Caps looked primed to make it 2-1 with two matches to play after they were set 180 to win in Hamilton on Wednesday courtesy of Kane Williamson's highest T20I score.

New Zealand needed just three to win off five balls in the last of their 20 regulation overs after Ross Taylor hit Mohammed Shami for six, but Williamson fell for a magnificent 95 two balls later.

There was more much more drama to come, with Taylor bowled off the last ball to leave the scores level with the hosts 179-6.

Williamson and Martin Guptill posted 17 off the extra over from Jasprit Bumrah and it appeared that would be enough with Rohit ​– who earlier top scored with 65 in India's 179-5 – needing 10 off two deliveries from Tim Southee, but the opener hammered the paceman for two sixes in a pulsating finale.

The stunning victory sealed India's first T20 series win in New Zealand, with Williamson and his side left shell-shocked again six months after a Super Over loss to England in the Cricket World Cup final, with the same opponents beating by the same method in November.

Williamson must have been fearing the worst when India were 69 without loss after the powerplay, Rohit clubbing three sixes in a sixth over from Hamish Bennett (3-54) that went for 27.

Colin de Grandhomme ended an opening stand of 89 when he had the in-form KL Rahul (27) taken by Colin Munro at point and the powerful Rohit was caught by Southee at long-on attempting to launch Bennett for another six. 

Virat Kohli (38) became the expensive Bennett's third victim before Manish Pandey and Ravindra Jadeja dispatched slower balls from Southee for six in a final over that cost 18 runs.

Martin Guptill blasted the second ball of the run chase from Shardul Thakur (2-21) beyond the rope, but the fast bowler sent the opener packing for 31 after he had struck another two sixes.

Munro and Mitchell Santner missed out, but Williamson raced to a 28-ball half-century before punching Jadeja for back-to-back sixes with exquisite timing. 

The skipper also set about Bumrah after de Grandhomme fell to Thakur, but he was unable to see New Zealand home, edging behind to end a stunning 48-ball masterclass that included six sixes.

New Zealand must have felt a sense of deja vu when Taylor was cleaned up by Shami (2-32) to extend the match and Rohit proved to be the Super Over hero on this occasion as Southee was given the treatment.

Marnus Labuschagne might get through a lot of chewing gum, but he sees no reason to change his batting ritual after playing a starring role in Australia's 3-0 series whitewash of New Zealand.

Australia completed their series sweep thanks to a David Warner century and another five-for from Nathan Lyon, as they sealed a resounding 279-run win in the third Test in Sydney.

Warner's unbeaten 111 led Australia to 217-2, Tim Paine declaring with a 415-run lead, and a comprehensive win was secured as the Black Caps were skittled for 136.

Labuschagne, who scored 215 runs in the first innings and hit 59 in the second, finished with 549 runs for the three-match series.

"It's been an amazing summer," he said at the post-match presentation where he was given the man-of-the-match and man-of-the-series awards.

"It's so special to share these moments with your family, who have been part of your journey. It's hard to put [the success] on one thing, but my level of concentration and not doing any silly things.

"A lot of gum but it's working, so why change. I just love the journey and it's been wonderful being part of this Australian team."

Labuschagne, along with Steve Smith and Warner, won praise from Paine, who says he is honoured to captain an Australia side ranked second in the ICC World Test Championship, while adding he hopes success on the pitch provides the nation with some enjoyment amid the ongoing bushfire crisis.

"I am very lucky to captain this group," the captain said. "Batting has become very consistent with Marnus leading this year and Steve and David back.

"It's a pretty simple task for me at times, to be honest. I think we can still get better, there were moments in this series as well when we were not at our best.

"We are really pleased with the progress we have made in the last 12 months but we know have some big series coming up.

"It hasn't been a great few weeks for our country. Our goal as a team is to give the Australians some entertainment. But our thoughts go out to them and firefighters are doing a great job."

New Zealand skipper Kane Williamson, meanwhile, acknowledged, his side must learn from their humbling defeat.

"Credit to the Australian team," Williamson said. "They were clinical but they put us under pressure session after session. There's so much to learn from this experience.

"We have a bit of time off, so a bit of regrouping. We were outplayed in all departments. There are number of things to work on and improve upon.

"For a number of guys, it's the first time here and you must appreciate it because you won't get this experience anywhere else."

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