Andrey Rublev celebrated his 22nd birthday in style, inflicting more Moscow woe on Adrian Mannarino to clinch the Kremlin Cup on home soil.

Home favourite Rublev had failed to win a match at the tournament in six previous visits but was a comprehensive 6-4 6-0 victor over Mannarino, who was beaten by Karen Khachanov in last season's showpiece.

Rublev broke at the first time of asking and that proved enough to clinch an otherwise tight opening set.

But it was one-way traffic in the second with Mannarino – who had not dropped a set in reaching the final – fittingly giving his opponent several gifts to capitulate in a match that lasted a little over an hour.

It marks Rublev's second ATP Tour title and he will break into the world's top 25 for the first time on Monday.

Denis Shapovalov landed the first ATP title of a career rich in promise when he fended off Filip Krajinovic in the final of the Stockholm Open.

At the age of 20, Canadian Shapovalov has already briefly cracked the world's top 20, and a 6-4 6-4 victory over Krajinovic saw him pass another major career milestone.

Seeded fourth in Sweden, Shapovalov won four matches without dropping a set, and the left-hander faced only one break point on Sunday.

He edged a narrow opener, helped by nine aces, and grabbed a crucial break in the ninth game of the second set when Krajinovic netted from the baseline.

Shapovalov served out for his first trophy success at main-tour level, with Krajinovic slapping an aggressive backhand into the top of the net on match point.

"We've been working really hard to try and lift an ATP title," said Shapovalov, after thanking his support team. "Now we're here, so thanks to everybody."

It was pointed out to him at the trophy presentation that Grigor Dimitrov and Stefanos Tsitsipas - both grand slam semi-finalists this year - won their first tour titles at Stockholm, too.

"It's definitely a big step for me," said Shapovalov.

"I've struggled to get past the semi-finals and to lift my first title here in Stockholm out of all places. I love this city so much, it's incredible for me.

"All of the names up there [on the list of past winners] are unbelievable players so hopefully I can back that up as well."

Andy Murray is looking forward to renewing acquaintances with Stan Wawrinka at the European Open in his first singles final since 2017.

Murray is playing his final tournament of the year, aside from the Davis Cup, in Antwerp as he continues a remarkable comeback from hip resurfacing surgery that was expected to end his career.

The three-time grand slam champion progressed to his first final since March 2017 with a 3-6 7-5 6-2 win over Ugo Humbert.

He will face Wawrinka, who himself tumbled out of the top 250 in 2018 after continued injury issues but is now back in the top 20, in the showpiece on Sunday.

"I am obviously happy to be in the final," said Murray. "I did very well to turn that match around today. It was tough. He was playing huge from the back of the court… it was tricky but I am obviously happy to be back in a final.

"I think it will be a nice match to play. Me and Stan have played a lot against each other… it is nice that we are both able to be back playing against each other in a final.

"It was obviously big for me to get that [6-5] game in the second set, but the game that won me the match was the first game of the third set.

"When I was 0-40 down, I think I played a couple of good points. It was a huge game to get out of. I felt like the momentum was with me once I won that game, I felt like that was what set me on my way."

Meanwhile, Denis Shapovalov is into his first career ATP final at the Stockholm Open, the 20-year-old overcoming Yuichi Sugita 7-5 6-2 to set up a meeting with Filip Krajinovic, who got the better of Pablo Carreno Busta over three sets.

At the Kremlin Cup, Andrey Rublev is a win away from his second ATP title after beating former US Open champion Marin Cilic 7-5 6-4.

He will face Adrian Mannarino, a 6-3 6-4 victor over Andreas Seppi.

Andy Murray reached his first ATP Tour singles semi-final for over two years by rolling up his sleeves to overcome Marius Copil in the European Open on Friday.

The three-time grand slam champion's persistence paid off as he battled past Copil with a 6-3 6-7 (7-9) 6-4 victory in Antwerp.

Murray squandered a 4-1 lead in a second set he lost after holding the same advantage in a tie-break, with Copil saving a match point. 

The Brit was not to be denied a place in the last four, winning what was his second quarter-final since returning from hip resurfacing surgery after claiming the only break of the final set.

Ugo Humbert stands in the way of Murray and a place in the final after coming from a set down to beat Guido Pella 5-7 6-4 6-4.

Fourth seed Stan Wawrinka outlasted Gilles Simon 6-3 6-7 (6-8) 6-2 and will face Jannik Sinner, who became the youngest ATP semi-finalist since 2014 when he got past Frances Tiafoe 6-4 3-6 6-3.

There will be no back-to-back Kremlin Cup triumphs for Karen Khachanov in his homeland after Andreas Seppi beat the defending champion 3-6 6-3 6-3.

Seppi has reached at least the quarter-finals in his past six appearances in Moscow and will face Adrian Mannarino - a straight-sets winner against Dusan Lajovic - for a place in the final after claiming the scalp of the second seed.

Marin Cilic took out Jeremy Chardy 6-4 4-6 7-6 (7-2) and will go up against Andrey Rublev, who saw the back of Nikola Milojevic 6-2 6-3.

There will be no dream swansong for Janko Tipsarevic at the Stockholm Open after Yuichi Sugita ended the Serbian's career with a 6-2 4-6 7-6 (7-4) triumph, booking a semi-final showdown with Denis Shapovalov.

Shapovalov eased to a 6-0 6-3 defeat of Cedrik-Marcel Stebe, while Pablo Carreno Busta beat Sam Querrey and will face Filip Krajinovic - conqueror of Yoshihito Nishioka.

Andy Murray moved into the quarter-finals by beating Pablo Cuevas after the top three seeds crashed out of the European Open, while Fabio Fognini was dumped out in Stockholm on Thursday.

Murray produced another encouraging performance in Antwerp, reaching the last eight of a singles tournament for the second time since returning to the ATP Tour following a hip resurfacing operation in January.

The former world number one saw off eighth seed Cuevas 6-4 6-3 after saving all four break points he faced, winning 82 per cent of points on his first serve and 74 per cent behind his second.

Murrray started strongly and dominated from the back of the court, finishing Cuevas off with back-to-back aces to ensure he will take on Marius Copil.

Copil ousted Diego Schwartzman 6-4 5-7 7-6 (9-7), while top seed Gael Monfils went down 6-3 6-2 to 18-year-old Italian outsider Jannik Sinner and David Goffin, the second seed, was thumped 6-3 6-1 by Ugo Humbert in his homeland.

Jan-Lennard Struff was another seed to fall in the second round, losing 6-3 6-4 to Frances Tiafoe.

Janko Tipsarevic's retirement will have to wait until another day after he hammered ATP Finals contender Fognini 6-1 6-1 to move into the quarter-finals of the Stockholm Open.

Tipsarevic lost just four points on his first serve and will take on lucky loser Yuichi Sugita, who beat Stefano Travaglia in straight sets.

Fourth seed Denis Shapovalov got the better of Alexei Popyrin 6-4 7-6 (7-3) in the Swedish capital, with Pablo Carreno Busta and Cedrik-Marcel Stebe also victorious.

Marin Cilic beat fellow Croatian Ivo Karlovic 6-1 7-6 (7-5) to book a Kremlin Cup quarter-final showdown with Jeremy Chardy, who came out on top against Miomir Kecmanovic.

Andrey Rublev and lucky loser Nikola Milojevic came through their second-round matches versus Egor Gerasimov and Alen Avidzba respectively in Moscow.

Twenty-time grand slam champion Roger Federer has confirmed he will play the French Open next year.

The 38-year-old returned to Roland Garros in 2019 after a three-year absence, reaching his first major semi-final since the 2018 Australian Open.

Federer, whose lone French Open title came a decade ago, has already confirmed his intention to participate at next year's Olympics and has also now revealed the second major of the year will be part of his schedule for 2020 too.

"I will play the French Open," he told CNN.

"I probably won't play much before that because I need some time away from it.

"I need some time with the family – we need a vacation, we need a break, especially if I'm playing the Olympics.

"I will probably play the French, Halle [Open], Wimbledon, Olympics and then maybe Cincinnati [Masters] and the US Open."

Karen Khachanov thrilled the Moscow crowd as he saved five match points before overcoming veteran Philipp Kohlschreiber at the Kremlin Cup.

The world number eight, top seed and defending champion at the ATP 250 event, found himself 5-3 down in the decider but refused to buckle as Kohlschreiber eyed a notable scalp on his 36th birthday.

Khachanov – now the focus of home hopes after Daniil Medvedev's withdrawal due to fatigue - repelled three match points to force a tie-break and his calmness from the baseline saw him through more trouble to prevail 3-6 6-3 7-6 (9-7).

Andreas Seppi is up next for Khachanov after the experienced Italian similarly came from a set down to beat Roberto Carballes Baena 5-7 6-1 6-3.

Serbian fourth seed Dusan Lajovic also went the distance against Lukas Rosol, coming through 6-4 6-7 (8-6) 6-3 to beat his Czech opponent and set up a quarter-final clash against last year's runner-up Adrian Mannarino – a straight-sets winner over Mikhail Kukushkin.

Stan Wawrinka returned to action at the European Open, competing for the first time since his US Open quarter-final loss, and his troublesome knee was given a thorough workout by Feliciano Lopez.

The two seasoned campaigners provided plenty of entertainment - a sumptuous backhand half-volley at the net in the first set serving as a particular highlight from Wawrinka, who came through 6-7 (4-7) 6-4 7-6 (7-4).

The 34-year-old Swiss will take on Gilles Simon in the quarter-finals after the world number 47 came through his all-French clash against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-4 7-5.

Andy Murray will face Pablo Cuevas in round two after the eighth-seeded Uruguayan beat Hugo Dellien 6-4 6-3, while Guido Pella ensured further South American success by beating Kwon Soon-woo 7-5 7-5 to earn a quarter-final place.

Frances Tiafoe's reward for breaking a three-match losing streak, defeating Yannick Maden, will be a meeting with another German opponent in Jan-Lennard Struff.

At the Stockholm Open, US Open semi-finalist and second seed Grigor Dimitrov was dumped out by Sam Querrey, losing 6-7 (7-9) 6-3 7-6 (7-3). Taylor Fritz was another seed to fall – 7-5 6-4 against Yoshihito Nishioka,

Filip Krajinovic is up next for Nishioka after beating Dan Evans 7-5 2-6 6-3.

Andy Murray advanced to the second round at the European Open with a straight-sets win over Kimmer Coppejans.

The former world number one triumphed 6-4 7-6 (7-4) to win a match in two sets for just the second time since August.

He was made to work hard by Coppejans, who broke Murray three times in total, including in his first two service games in the second set, but the Briton eventually prevailed in an hour and 45 minutes.

Seventh seed Jan-Lennard Struff dropped just three games in beating Gregoire Barrere, while Gilles Simon and Feliciano Lopez were among the other players to advance.

At the Kremlin Cup, home hope Andrey Rublev overcame Alexander Bublik 6-1 3-6 6-4.

After taking the opener, Rublev then lost the first five games in a row en route to losing the second set and the sixth seed was a break down in the decider only to rally and progress.

Ivo Karlovic staved off a match point and won a third-set tie-break against Aljaz Bedene to progress, along with Jeremy Chardy and Philipp Kohlschreiber, who beat Nicolas Jarry and Pierre-Hugues Herbert respectively.

Pablo Carreno Busta was the only seed in action at the Stockholm Open and he defeated John Millman 6-4 6-3, with Sam Querrey among those to also go through.

Jo-Wilfried Tsonga opened his campaign at the European Open in Antwerp with victory over Lorenzo Sonego.

The 2017 champion and sixth seed - aiming to win his third title of the season - recorded a break of serve in each set to go through 6-3 6-4, with either fellow Frenchman Gilles Simon or Belgian Steve Darcis up next for Tsonga.

Life was far tougher for fifth seed Guido Pella on Monday, however, as he fought back from a set down to beat German Peter Gojowczyk 5-7 6-4 7-6 (7-2).

At the Stockholm Open, Janko Tipsarevic kicked off his final tournament on the ATP Tour in fine style, beating Corentin Moutet 6-2 6-4 in just 73 minutes.

The 35-year-old has announced he will retire after the Davis Cup Finals in November, though his singles career is not finished just yet. Next up for Tipsarevic is the top seed this week in Sweden, Italian Fabio Fognini. 

Dan Evans won 6-4 1-6 6-3 against Bernard Tomic but fellow seed Reilly Opelka was on the wrong end of an upset, losing a three-set battle to Stefano Travaglia 7-5 4-6 6-4.

There was also a surprise in the opening round of the Kremlin Cup in Moscow, with Andreas Seppi eliminating fifth seed Cristian Garin 3-6 7-6 (7-2) 7-6 (7-4). In contrast, Adrian Mannarino, the seventh seed, breezed by qualifier Damir Dzumhur 7-6 (7-2) 6-0.

Roger Federer has confirmed he will play at the 2020 Olympic Games, revealing his "heart decided" to compete again.

The Swiss will be aiming to secure a third medal next year in Tokyo; he struck gold playing alongside Stan Wawrinka in the men's doubles in Beijing in 2008, then collected silver in the singles tournament four years later in London, falling in the final to home favourite Andy Murray.

Federer, 38, also represented his country at the Olympics in 2000, losing out in the bronze-medal match to Arnaud Di Pasquale, and 2004, but missed Rio 2016 while recovering from a knee injury.

The 20-time grand slam champion announced his decision to compete again after an exhibition match against John Isner staged in the host city for next year's Games.

"I've been debating with my team for a few weeks now, months actually, what I should do in the summer time [of 2020] after Wimbledon and before the US Open," he said, according to the Olympic Channel website.

"At the end of the day my heart decided I would love to play the Olympic Games again.

"I carried the flag twice for Switzerland in Athens and Beijing, I've got a gold and a silver, and I would love to play again so I'm very excited."

Federer has won three titles on the ATP Tour this season, while he finished runner-up to Novak Djokovic at Wimbledon after reaching the last four at the French Open.

Daniil Medvedev's remarkable 2019 continued with a straight-sets defeat of Alexander Zverev in the final of the Shanghai Masters on Sunday.

Medvedev, for whom it was a second 1000 Masters Series triumph of the year following his victory in Cincinnati, won 6-4 6-1 in an hour and 13 minutes with Zverev unable to cap a resurgent week in style.

The German was the architect of his own downfall in parts, particularly at the end of the first set, but Medvedev was a deserving winner, registering his tour-leading 59th victory of the season in his sixth successive final.

It was that form that prompted Zverev to describe his opponent as "the best player in the world right now", and Medvedev looked a man full of confidence in the early stages, quickly establishing a 3-0 lead.

Zverev hit back, though, displaying flashes of the form that saw him beat Roger Federer in the quarter-finals, by levelling it at 3-3.

It remained on serve until Medvedev's relentless baseline approach finally created pressure, under which Zverev buckled.

Serving at 4-5, 30-all, the German threw in two double faults to drop the first set and hand the Russian an advantage he never looked like relinquishing.

A missed break-point opportunity for Zverev at the start of the second set reinforced the suspicion it wasn't going to be his day, and more generosity from the fifth seed enabled Medvedev to break from 40-0 down to claim a 2-0 lead.

Another break made it 4-0 and although Zverev managed to avoid the bagel, he was powerless to prevent Medvedev from backing up his win in St Petersburg three weeks ago.

Medvedev, who has not dropped a set since going down in five to Rafael Nadal in the final of the US Open, said: "Shanghai is one of the most prestigious tournaments on the tour. It's really special to have my photo in the corridor."

On his remarkable run, he added: "It's something outrageous what I have done the past few months. It is how it is, I just take it and I hope I can do much more."

Daniil Medvedev reached his sixth consecutive ATP Tour final at the Shanghai Masters and will face Alexander Zverev in Sunday's showpiece.

The Russian continued his stunning second half of 2019 with a battling 7-6 (7-5) 7-5 win over Stefanos Tsitsipas in his semi-final match.

Zverev, meanwhile, followed up his quarter-final win over Roger Federer with a more straightforward last-four triumph over Matteo Berrettini.

US Open semi-finalist Berrettini was beaten 6-3 6-4 in 67 minutes.
 

MEDVEDEV IN ELITE COMPANY

Since Wimbledon, Medvedev has now reached the final of the Washington Open, Rogers Cup, Cincinnati Masters, US Open, St Petersburg Open and Shanghai Masters. 

If he can top Zverev in China, it will be his third win of those six championship matches. He has a record of 28-3 over that span.

The supreme streak puts Medvedev in elite company, as only four players have achieved a run of more consecutive finals. Those names are modern greats in Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer and Andy Murray.

"Making six finals in a row, including three Masters 1000s and one Grand Slam, is something I could never dream of," Medvedev said. 

"But I want to keep the momentum going and hope I can make it to seven or eight."

Medvedev has now reached a tour-leading nine finals in 2019. Indeed, no one else has made it to more than five.

The Russian has beaten Tsitsipas in all five of their head-to-head meetings, with his victory on Saturday taking one hour and 36 minutes

Tsitsipas had defeated Djokovic in the last eight to follow up on last week's run to the China Open final but fell short on the key points this time around.

He had the only three break points of an opening set dominated by serve when Medvedev was 0-40 down at 4-4, but could not convert any of them.

Medvedev then claimed a close tie-break when Tsitsipas sent a backhand off target, with only one point coming against serve.

The Greek star was broken in the third game of the second set and while he fought back to level at 5-5, he could not follow up with a hold as Medvedev immediately struck back.

Serving for the match, Medvedev held comfortably and claimed his first match point with a lethal volleyed forehand.

Tsitsipas said: "I don't know if I'm going to be able to beat him the next time or the time after that one, but I know there's going to be a time where I'm going to find opportunities and beat him. 

"I don't know when it's going to come. Probably two, three, four, five, six years' time, I don't know, but it's going to come at some point."
 

ZVEREV ON A ROLL

Zverev boosted his hopes of reaching the ATP Finals by reaching his first championship match since May and a first Masters final of 2019.

Seeking a fourth career Masters title, he has met Medvedev four times before and won on every occasion.

Zverev dispatched Berrettini – one of his rivals to secure a place in London – reasonably comfortably as his serve proved key, the Italian not even getting a break point in the match.

The German only lost two points on serve in the first set and, in a closer second, claimed his fourth break point of the game while returning at 4-4 to make the decisive breakthrough before holding serve to triumph.

Zverev, who had 11 aces, said: "It feels great, obviously. I felt like I've played some decent tennis this week and being in a Masters 1000 final here in Shanghai is also something very special for me.

"I'm looking forward to it and hopefully I can play some good tennis."

Andy Murray believes there is an outside chance he can return to the top of men's tennis, though his more pressing priority is the latest addition to his growing family.

Murray's wife Kim is expecting their third child this month and the latest stage of his comeback from hip resurfacing surgery at the European Open in Antwerp will be put on hold if the baby arrives early.

The three-time grand slam champion and former world number one has impressed in recent events and saw off a top-20 player in Matteo Berrettini at the China Open, though he lost in the quarter-finals to Dominic Thiem.

A thrilling second-round defeat to Fabio Fognini at the Shanghai Masters provided more reasons for optimism and the Australian Open confirmed Murray will be in the field at the first grand slam of 2020.

Having previously said it would be naive to expect him to return to his best, Murray provided a more upbeat projection of what the future may hold in an interview with The Times.

"I am surprised with how smooth it has been," Murray said of his comeback. "I had two years of having lots of pain after every single match. Now I play a match, the body hurts, I have some pain in my back, the muscles are tired and things like that, but my hip is fine and I couldn't remember what that was like before.

"It has been hard but I expected it to be quite a bumpy road because it wasn't something that has been done in tennis before. I know having done this that you will see way more athletes having this operation and coming back to compete, because there is no reason why you shouldn't be able to.

"There is no pain. The range of motion is the one thing that is a bit limited in some sports. I don't know if there are some sports in which that is more important than tennis. But it is great.

"I have been competitive so far. If I can keep improving a few things over the next few months, then maybe there is an outside chance I can get around there [the top of the sport]. But I am not going to be playing a similar schedule to what I played beforehand.

"If I do get up there, I'm not going to be focusing on ranking targets. You look at what Roger [Federer], Rafa [Nadal] and I guess Novak [Djokovic], to a certain extent, are doing to give themselves a chance to play longer.

"Right now, Rafa could be fighting to finish number one in the world and it's not a priority for him. I would like to be competitive in the big events against the best players. I'm not there yet, but I'm closer than I was a month ago, and much closer than a couple of months ago.

"I now know that it’s not important where or when I end my career. If I had another hip injury, I probably wouldn't keep going. I wouldn't want to do another six or seven months or rehab, because I feel I pretty much had two years of it.

"My hip could break and that would be it. I would be finished if that happened. But there is no sign of that happening any time soon. It seems to be getting stronger all the time."

On how the imminent arrival of his third child could alter his plans for the coming week in Belgium, Murray said: "Obviously the baby can come any time from pretty much next week.

"I would adjust my schedule if I couldn't go to Antwerp. My plan is to play Antwerp and then I am done through to the Davis Cup [in November]. If the baby came early, I would miss Antwerp and then maybe play at the Paris Masters [starting October 26]."

Roger Federer was impressed by Alexander Zverev's cool-headed approach as the German claimed a dramatic Shanghai Masters quarter-final win.

While the usually serene Federer lost his temper and suffered a point deduction in the deciding set after hitting a ball into the crowd in frustration, Zverev proved far more focused.

That served him well when, having squandered five match points in the second set, Zverev dusted himself down to win the third and seal a 6-3 6-7 (7-9) 6-3 victory.

Despite his own evident dissatisfaction, Federer had some kind words for his opponent after a fiery contest.

"I told him at the net that he showed great character, that he was strong," said the 20-time grand slam champion.

"I thought he didn't show any frustrations or too much negativity. I didn't see him very often being extremely frustrated except the one time when he hit three let cords in a row, the last game I think it was.

"That was impressive, because he has tendencies to get a bit down on himself, especially this season he hasn't been playing maybe so well, so that impressed me the most. 

"If I can get one per cent of that, I'm happy, too."

Matteo Berrettini is up next for Zverev, who reflected on a remarkable end to the second set, when he was on the brink of a far more straightforward success.

"Obviously I had three [match points] on my serve and two more in the tie-break," he said. "I played great tennis and didn't do unforced errors or anything like that.

"I knew if I keep playing the way I was playing in the first two sets I was going to have a chance in the third as well.

"I don't think Roger Federer's game suits anybody to be honest. He is the greatest player of all time. He will always find a way and make it tricky for you like he did with me.

"You have always got to play your best tennis to have a chance."

Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer both suffered quarter-final exits at the Shanghai Masters on Friday, guaranteeing a first-time winner of the tournament this year. 

The top two seeds were widely expected to contest the final but succumbed to Stefanos Tsitsipas and Alexander Zverev respectively.

Daniil Medvedev and Matteo Berrettini also secured their progress to settle the semi-final line-up in China.

And there was an added bonus for Tsitsipas as he claimed a spot at the ATP Finals. 

DJOKOVIC DOWNED BY TSITSIPAS' 'BEST COMEBACK'

Tsitsipas recovered from a set down to beat reigning champion Djokovic 3-6 7-5 6-3 and labelled it his "best comeback".

The Greek will now face Medvedev in the last four, having earned an end-of-season Finals spot courtesy of the Russian's 6-3 7-6 (7-4) win over Fabio Fognini.

"It's the best comeback that I have ever had, probably," said Tsitsipas.

"I would say also [the] Federer comeback in the Australian Open wasn't easy. I lost the first set against one of the best tennis players in the world and managed to win three consecutive sets after that.

"Same today, but with less sets, two sets, which was quite difficult for me to pull out. It was a very difficult victory mentally, too.

"I wasn't really thinking that long term that I have to win two sets. It just went step by step. It happened."

FRUSTRATED FEDERER FALLS TO ZVEREV

Federer is usually a picture of calm on the tennis court, but he was evidently ruffled in his 6-3 6-7 (7-9) 6-3 loss to Zverev.

The Swiss, who rescued five match points to win a remarkable second set, was docked a point in the fourth game of the decider after hitting the ball into the crowd in anger.

His frustration may have stemmed from an inability to find his rhythm against an inspired Zverev, who was 40-0 up when serving for the match in the second set.

Having seemingly thrown his chances away, Zverev dug deep and broke Federer at the first opportunity in the final set to claim an advantage he refused to surrender. 

Berrettini awaits, the Italian having overcome Dominic Thiem 7-6 (10-8) 6-4.

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