Daniil Medvedev's remarkable 2019 continued with a straight-sets defeat of Alexander Zverev in the final of the Shanghai Masters on Sunday.

Medvedev, for whom it was a second 1000 Masters Series triumph of the year following his victory in Cincinnati, won 6-4 6-1 in an hour and 13 minutes with Zverev unable to cap a resurgent week in style.

The German was the architect of his own downfall in parts, particularly at the end of the first set, but Medvedev was a deserving winner, registering his tour-leading 59th victory of the season in his sixth successive final.

It was that form that prompted Zverev to describe his opponent as "the best player in the world right now", and Medvedev looked a man full of confidence in the early stages, quickly establishing a 3-0 lead.

Zverev hit back, though, displaying flashes of the form that saw him beat Roger Federer in the quarter-finals, by levelling it at 3-3.

It remained on serve until Medvedev's relentless baseline approach finally created pressure, under which Zverev buckled.

Serving at 4-5, 30-all, the German threw in two double faults to drop the first set and hand the Russian an advantage he never looked like relinquishing.

A missed break-point opportunity for Zverev at the start of the second set reinforced the suspicion it wasn't going to be his day, and more generosity from the fifth seed enabled Medvedev to break from 40-0 down to claim a 2-0 lead.

Another break made it 4-0 and although Zverev managed to avoid the bagel, he was powerless to prevent Medvedev from backing up his win in St Petersburg three weeks ago.

Medvedev, who has not dropped a set since going down in five to Rafael Nadal in the final of the US Open, said: "Shanghai is one of the most prestigious tournaments on the tour. It's really special to have my photo in the corridor."

On his remarkable run, he added: "It's something outrageous what I have done the past few months. It is how it is, I just take it and I hope I can do much more."

Daniil Medvedev reached his sixth consecutive ATP Tour final at the Shanghai Masters and will face Alexander Zverev in Sunday's showpiece.

The Russian continued his stunning second half of 2019 with a battling 7-6 (7-5) 7-5 win over Stefanos Tsitsipas in his semi-final match.

Zverev, meanwhile, followed up his quarter-final win over Roger Federer with a more straightforward last-four triumph over Matteo Berrettini.

US Open semi-finalist Berrettini was beaten 6-3 6-4 in 67 minutes.
 

MEDVEDEV IN ELITE COMPANY

Since Wimbledon, Medvedev has now reached the final of the Washington Open, Rogers Cup, Cincinnati Masters, US Open, St Petersburg Open and Shanghai Masters. 

If he can top Zverev in China, it will be his third win of those six championship matches. He has a record of 28-3 over that span.

The supreme streak puts Medvedev in elite company, as only four players have achieved a run of more consecutive finals. Those names are modern greats in Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer and Andy Murray.

"Making six finals in a row, including three Masters 1000s and one Grand Slam, is something I could never dream of," Medvedev said. 

"But I want to keep the momentum going and hope I can make it to seven or eight."

Medvedev has now reached a tour-leading nine finals in 2019. Indeed, no one else has made it to more than five.

The Russian has beaten Tsitsipas in all five of their head-to-head meetings, with his victory on Saturday taking one hour and 36 minutes

Tsitsipas had defeated Djokovic in the last eight to follow up on last week's run to the China Open final but fell short on the key points this time around.

He had the only three break points of an opening set dominated by serve when Medvedev was 0-40 down at 4-4, but could not convert any of them.

Medvedev then claimed a close tie-break when Tsitsipas sent a backhand off target, with only one point coming against serve.

The Greek star was broken in the third game of the second set and while he fought back to level at 5-5, he could not follow up with a hold as Medvedev immediately struck back.

Serving for the match, Medvedev held comfortably and claimed his first match point with a lethal volleyed forehand.

Tsitsipas said: "I don't know if I'm going to be able to beat him the next time or the time after that one, but I know there's going to be a time where I'm going to find opportunities and beat him. 

"I don't know when it's going to come. Probably two, three, four, five, six years' time, I don't know, but it's going to come at some point."
 

ZVEREV ON A ROLL

Zverev boosted his hopes of reaching the ATP Finals by reaching his first championship match since May and a first Masters final of 2019.

Seeking a fourth career Masters title, he has met Medvedev four times before and won on every occasion.

Zverev dispatched Berrettini – one of his rivals to secure a place in London – reasonably comfortably as his serve proved key, the Italian not even getting a break point in the match.

The German only lost two points on serve in the first set and, in a closer second, claimed his fourth break point of the game while returning at 4-4 to make the decisive breakthrough before holding serve to triumph.

Zverev, who had 11 aces, said: "It feels great, obviously. I felt like I've played some decent tennis this week and being in a Masters 1000 final here in Shanghai is also something very special for me.

"I'm looking forward to it and hopefully I can play some good tennis."

Andy Murray believes there is an outside chance he can return to the top of men's tennis, though his more pressing priority is the latest addition to his growing family.

Murray's wife Kim is expecting their third child this month and the latest stage of his comeback from hip resurfacing surgery at the European Open in Antwerp will be put on hold if the baby arrives early.

The three-time grand slam champion and former world number one has impressed in recent events and saw off a top-20 player in Matteo Berrettini at the China Open, though he lost in the quarter-finals to Dominic Thiem.

A thrilling second-round defeat to Fabio Fognini at the Shanghai Masters provided more reasons for optimism and the Australian Open confirmed Murray will be in the field at the first grand slam of 2020.

Having previously said it would be naive to expect him to return to his best, Murray provided a more upbeat projection of what the future may hold in an interview with The Times.

"I am surprised with how smooth it has been," Murray said of his comeback. "I had two years of having lots of pain after every single match. Now I play a match, the body hurts, I have some pain in my back, the muscles are tired and things like that, but my hip is fine and I couldn't remember what that was like before.

"It has been hard but I expected it to be quite a bumpy road because it wasn't something that has been done in tennis before. I know having done this that you will see way more athletes having this operation and coming back to compete, because there is no reason why you shouldn't be able to.

"There is no pain. The range of motion is the one thing that is a bit limited in some sports. I don't know if there are some sports in which that is more important than tennis. But it is great.

"I have been competitive so far. If I can keep improving a few things over the next few months, then maybe there is an outside chance I can get around there [the top of the sport]. But I am not going to be playing a similar schedule to what I played beforehand.

"If I do get up there, I'm not going to be focusing on ranking targets. You look at what Roger [Federer], Rafa [Nadal] and I guess Novak [Djokovic], to a certain extent, are doing to give themselves a chance to play longer.

"Right now, Rafa could be fighting to finish number one in the world and it's not a priority for him. I would like to be competitive in the big events against the best players. I'm not there yet, but I'm closer than I was a month ago, and much closer than a couple of months ago.

"I now know that it’s not important where or when I end my career. If I had another hip injury, I probably wouldn't keep going. I wouldn't want to do another six or seven months or rehab, because I feel I pretty much had two years of it.

"My hip could break and that would be it. I would be finished if that happened. But there is no sign of that happening any time soon. It seems to be getting stronger all the time."

On how the imminent arrival of his third child could alter his plans for the coming week in Belgium, Murray said: "Obviously the baby can come any time from pretty much next week.

"I would adjust my schedule if I couldn't go to Antwerp. My plan is to play Antwerp and then I am done through to the Davis Cup [in November]. If the baby came early, I would miss Antwerp and then maybe play at the Paris Masters [starting October 26]."

Roger Federer was impressed by Alexander Zverev's cool-headed approach as the German claimed a dramatic Shanghai Masters quarter-final win.

While the usually serene Federer lost his temper and suffered a point deduction in the deciding set after hitting a ball into the crowd in frustration, Zverev proved far more focused.

That served him well when, having squandered five match points in the second set, Zverev dusted himself down to win the third and seal a 6-3 6-7 (7-9) 6-3 victory.

Despite his own evident dissatisfaction, Federer had some kind words for his opponent after a fiery contest.

"I told him at the net that he showed great character, that he was strong," said the 20-time grand slam champion.

"I thought he didn't show any frustrations or too much negativity. I didn't see him very often being extremely frustrated except the one time when he hit three let cords in a row, the last game I think it was.

"That was impressive, because he has tendencies to get a bit down on himself, especially this season he hasn't been playing maybe so well, so that impressed me the most. 

"If I can get one per cent of that, I'm happy, too."

Matteo Berrettini is up next for Zverev, who reflected on a remarkable end to the second set, when he was on the brink of a far more straightforward success.

"Obviously I had three [match points] on my serve and two more in the tie-break," he said. "I played great tennis and didn't do unforced errors or anything like that.

"I knew if I keep playing the way I was playing in the first two sets I was going to have a chance in the third as well.

"I don't think Roger Federer's game suits anybody to be honest. He is the greatest player of all time. He will always find a way and make it tricky for you like he did with me.

"You have always got to play your best tennis to have a chance."

Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer both suffered quarter-final exits at the Shanghai Masters on Friday, guaranteeing a first-time winner of the tournament this year. 

The top two seeds were widely expected to contest the final but succumbed to Stefanos Tsitsipas and Alexander Zverev respectively.

Daniil Medvedev and Matteo Berrettini also secured their progress to settle the semi-final line-up in China.

And there was an added bonus for Tsitsipas as he claimed a spot at the ATP Finals. 

DJOKOVIC DOWNED BY TSITSIPAS' 'BEST COMEBACK'

Tsitsipas recovered from a set down to beat reigning champion Djokovic 3-6 7-5 6-3 and labelled it his "best comeback".

The Greek will now face Medvedev in the last four, having earned an end-of-season Finals spot courtesy of the Russian's 6-3 7-6 (7-4) win over Fabio Fognini.

"It's the best comeback that I have ever had, probably," said Tsitsipas.

"I would say also [the] Federer comeback in the Australian Open wasn't easy. I lost the first set against one of the best tennis players in the world and managed to win three consecutive sets after that.

"Same today, but with less sets, two sets, which was quite difficult for me to pull out. It was a very difficult victory mentally, too.

"I wasn't really thinking that long term that I have to win two sets. It just went step by step. It happened."

FRUSTRATED FEDERER FALLS TO ZVEREV

Federer is usually a picture of calm on the tennis court, but he was evidently ruffled in his 6-3 6-7 (7-9) 6-3 loss to Zverev.

The Swiss, who rescued five match points to win a remarkable second set, was docked a point in the fourth game of the decider after hitting the ball into the crowd in anger.

His frustration may have stemmed from an inability to find his rhythm against an inspired Zverev, who was 40-0 up when serving for the match in the second set.

Having seemingly thrown his chances away, Zverev dug deep and broke Federer at the first opportunity in the final set to claim an advantage he refused to surrender. 

Berrettini awaits, the Italian having overcome Dominic Thiem 7-6 (10-8) 6-4.

Alexander Zverev ended a frustrated Roger Federer's hopes of a third Shanghai Masters title as he claimed a stunning 6-3 6-7 (7-9) 6-3 quarter-final triumph.

The German took his head-to-head record against the 20-time grand slam champion to 4-3 with a display of immense quality and huge character. 

Federer, winner of the title in 2014 and 2017, frequently showed his displeasure and repeatedly argued with the umpire, even landing a point penalty after hitting the ball into the crowd in anger.

But his unrest was largely down to the brilliance of Zverev, who defiantly overcame the setback of missing out on five match-point openings in the second set.

The result came after reigning champion Novak Djokovic had already been dumped out by Stefanos Tsitsipas.

It was Zverev who forged ahead, seizing on a break-point opening that came after a stinging forehand return winner.

He then confidently held serve for a 5-2 lead as Zverev continued to look the more settled of the two, a fact further underlined when he served out the final game of the set to love.

Federer offered a swift riposte at the start of the second set, clinching a break after settling a lengthy rally with a deft drop shot that Zverev could only lob wide on the stretch. 

But Zverev refused to wilt and, showing remarkable power and accuracy to dictate matters from the baseline, he clawed his way back to level terms. 

Serving at 5-5, Federer failed to land a first serve and found an inspired Zverev on the other side of the net, the 22-year-old battling hard to stay in a point that he ended up winning with a glorious, laser-like forehand down the line.

Federer produced his best tennis at 40-0 down, rescuing himself from the brink with a series of inspired shots to force a tie-break in which he survived two more match points before levelling things up.

To Zverev's credit, he was soon back on the offensive and raced into a 3-0 lead in the decider, dropping only two points in the process.

He clung fiercely to that advantage against an uncharacteristically irritable Federer, who was docked a point in game four after striking a ball away in anger, having already been warned for doing so earlier.

Despite saving the two break points that resulted from that penalty, there was no way back for Federer as Zverev sealed a memorable win in a contest lasting more than two hours. 

An inspired Stefanos Tsitsipas came from a set down to end Novak Djokovic's reign as Shanghai Masters champion and reach the semi-finals after qualifying for the ATP Finals.

Daniil Medvedev's 6-3 7-6 (7-4) victory over Fabio Fognini sealed Tsitsipas' spot in the season-ending tournament in London for the first time and the 21-year-old capped a memorable Friday by beating Djokovic 3-6 7-5 6-3.

The sixth seed won his first encounter with the world number one at the Rogers Cup last year and gained revenge for a defeat in their second meeting in Madrid this season, having also beaten Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal in 2019.

Four-time champion Djokovic was denied back-to-back titles after his Japan Open Tennis Championships triumph last weekend as Tsitsipas struck 34 winners in a pulsating quarter-final in Shanghai, setting up a last-four contest with Medvedev. 

Djokovic was 3-0 up after only seven minutes in a blistering start and lost just one point in his first three service games.

Tsitsipas had a first break-point opportunity in the seventh game, but the 16-time grand slam champion prevented the world number seven from getting back on serve and took the opening set in just over half an hour.

Djokovic got himself out of trouble to level at 3-3 in the second set after drilling a forehand long to gift his opponent a couple of break points.

Tsitsipas, runner-up at the China Open last week, continued to put the Serbian under pressure, though, and got the elusive break to level the match as he continued to unleash winner after winner.

One of 26 unforced errors from Djokovic gave Tsitsipas, who produced an array of searing backhand and forehand winners, three break points and he grasped the opportunity to take a 3-1 lead in the third before going on to seal his place in the penultimate round.

Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer face tricky quarter-final matches at the Shanghai Masters on Friday after the star pair battled through to the last eight.

World number one and defending champion Djokovic defeated John Isner 7-5 6-3, while second seed Federer got the better of David Goffin, earning a 7-6 (9-7) 6-4 success.

Djokovic goes on to tackle Stefanos Tsitsipas, who overcame a significant scare as he beat Hubert Hurkacz 7-5 3-6 7-6 (7-5), with Alexander Zverev up next for Federer.

German Zverev threatened to blow Andrey Rublev away after a first-set rout, but he was then made to work hard to come through 6-0 7-6 (7-4).

Daniil Medvedev, the third seed, and Dominic Thiem, the fourth seed, both won in straight sets, seeing off Vasek Pospisil and Nikoloz Basilashvili respectively.


DJOKOVIC SERVES UP A TREAT

The top seed was speaking of the threat of Isner's famous serve from the moment their last-16 clash was booked and continued to do so after his win.

But Djokovic also managed to execute his own serve as effectively as he had hoped, complementing his typically excellent defensive game to get through.

"I managed to kind of read his serve and find a good position on the return - at the end of the first set and also the beginning of the second," the Serbian said.

"I won five games in a row and that was the key - obviously having a break each set, and then I held my serve. I thought it was one of the best serving matches I've had lately."


FEDERER FLUSTERED BUT THROUGH

If Djokovic performed better than he might have expected, Federer was a little taken aback by the level of opponent Goffin, whom he thrashed in straight sets for the loss of just four games at the US Open.

"I never really felt like I had the upper hand over David today," Federer said. "I thought he did a really good job. He was so much better than at the US Open."


STILL TWO MINOR UPSETS

The top eight seeds would have made up the quarter-final line-up if not for wins by Italians Fabio Fognini and Matteo Berrettini.

Fognini, the Monte Carlo champion who made headlines for a spat with Andy Murray earlier in the week, defeated Russian Karen Khachanov 6-3 7-5.

Berrettini, who lost to Murray last week, a month on from reaching the US Open semi-finals, got the better of Roberto Bautista Agut, tying up a 7-6 (7-5) 6-4 victory.

Fognini faces Medvedev next, with Berrettini up against Thiem.

Roger Federer conceded he had more than his fair share of good fortune in his Shanghai Masters win over David Goffin.

The Swiss maestro battled to a 7-6 (9-7) 6-4 triumph on Thursday to reach the last eight in China.

Federer saved five set points in the opener and sealed the second set after a solitary break of Goffin's serve.

"It was tough," said the 20-time grand slam champion. "He served for the set at 6-5. We both had chances but he probably had a few more I must admit.

"I had to play some very accurate shots and it went very close to the lines. They could easily have gone another way, I know that.

"I was a bit fortunate to win that first set but I played okay and I fought extremely hard.

"Sometimes it falls your way. I have had a good season and served well at the end.

"The first set was certainly crucial to put me in the lead."

The world number three will face Alexander Zverev in the quarter-finals.

Roger Federer was pushed to the limit by David Goffin as the world number three battled through to the quarter-finals of the Shanghai Masters.

Backed by vociferous support from the crowd, Federer was firmly tested by Goffin but the 38-year-old eventually came out on top 7-6 (9-7) 6-4 on Thursday.

While fellow favourite Novak Djokovic cruised through his tie with John Isner, Federer was far from at his sharpest, with world number 14 Goffin capitalising on some rusty play from the veteran in the opening set.

Goffin squandered a break point as Federer laboured to a hold of serve in the third game, though the Belgian had to save a set point at 4-5 down.

The momentum seemed to have swung in Goffin's favour when he broke to take a 6-5 lead but the second seed responded in style, forcing the tie-break with a delicate lob at the culmination of a thrilling rally.

An arduous first set was finally settled after Goffin failed to land a shot down the line - Federer planting a firm cross-court forehand to clinch the lead. 

Both players passed up break points throughout the early exchanges of another attritional set, though Federer took the upper hand when Goffin sent a weak effort into the net.

With Federer holding the next game with ease, Goffin served brilliantly to stay in the match.

It was to no avail, though, a cushioned drop shot setting the 20-time grand slam champion up to serve out a hard-fought victory with an ace.

Novak Djokovic outclassed John Isner as he progressed into the quarter-finals of the Shanghai Masters with a 7-5 6-3 victory.

Defending champion Djokovic was flawless at times on Thursday in a clinical display, controlling Isner's powerful serve.

Djokovic noted he had been nursing a shoulder injury heading into the tournament, though the Serbian showed no sign of a struggle with fitness as he wrapped up a 350th ATP 1000 career win with the minimum of fuss.

It did take Djokovic until the final game of a 42-minute first set to break his opponent and, with three set points to play with, he made no mistake when he drew Isner into an overhit backhand.

That came amid a run of nine successive points for Djokovic, who swiftly hit the front in set two as he looked to snuff out any lingering chances of a  fightback from the American.

Another break followed as Djokovic raced three games clear and, though Isner regained some composure to stem the tide, he was no match for the top seed's unerring serve.

Isner positioned himself for a break when he drew back to 30-30 in the seventh game, his resolve was quickly broken by more supreme serving.

Despite a brilliant, cushioned backhand from Djokovic, Isner held his nerve to stay in the match on his next serve.

But it merely staved off the inevitable - the world number one, who is aiming for a fifth title of 2019 and will face Hubert Hurkacz or Stefanos Tsitsipas in the last eight, serving out a dominant triumph with the first of three match points.

Novak Djokovic was buoyed by his display in Wednesday's 6-3 6-3 victory over Denis Shapovalov at the Shanghai Masters.

The reigning champion overcame a potentially tricky first obstacle in his pursuit of a fifth title at the event, getting the job done in an hour and 10 minutes.

Djokovic dropped just one point on serve in the first set as he secured a last-16 clash with John Isner.

"From the beginning I was sharp, I brought the right intensity and focus on the court," said the Serbian.

"Obviously Denis has played a match before here and won it, and conditions are played fast so I think it is quite suitable to his style of the game. Big serve, big forehand.

"I was constantly there in his return games but he was just managing to pull out some great shots, especially with the serve.

"It was a crucial break, I think, at 3-2, first set. It kind of allowed me to start swinging through a bit more and stepping into his second serve.

"Second set was great, he started off much better with some break points. I was lucky to save those. Just overall a really good performance and I am very pleased."

Djokovic won the Japan Open last time out and has opted to combine his bid for singles glory with a shot at the doubles crown in China.

He and compatriot Filip Krajinovic face Jamie Murray and Neal Skupski on Thursday, with Djokovic's Isner showdown also on the agenda.

"I'm excited for both matches," he said. "Obviously John has one of the best serves in the history of tennis, so he can beat anybody if he is serving big and feeling well from the baseline and volleying well.

"I think the key is obviously how many serves I can get back in play. The more I do that, the better chance I have."

Novak Djokovic overcame Denis Shapovalov to book a Shanghai Masters last-16 spot as he made an impressive start to his defence of the title.

The Serbian wrapped up a 6-3 6-3 victory as he bids for a fifth trophy success at the event, where he will face John Isner next.

Isner, seeded 16th, beat Lucas Pouille 7-5 6-3, while Dominic Thiem also progressed to the next round courtesy of a 7-6 (7-3) 6-3 victory over Pablo Carreno Busta.

That was the final match on court and rounded off a day in which all 10 clashes were decided in two sets.

DOMINANT DJOKOVIC SOUNDS WARNING TO RIVALS

Shapovalov played well but could not keep pace with his illustrious rival across the net, Djokovic dropping only one point on serve in the first set.

No man has won more titles at this event than Djokovic and, on this evidence, he will be adding to his tally.

Djokovic was deadly accurate and coasted through his service games, dictating rallies and offering almost no hope to his Canadian opponent.

Even when Shapovalov upped his game on serve, Djokovic produced a string of superb returns to maintain the ascendancy.

In the other half of the draw, fourth seed Thiem battled past Carreno Busta as the Austrian advanced his claims for a second Masters win of 2019, having won at Indian Wells. 

The Austrian saved three set points in the opener and took control of the tie-break before settling matters in a more comfortable second set. 

TSITSIPAS, ZVEREV AVOID TIE-BREAK TROUBLE

A straight-sets win may always seem simple on paper, but Stefanos Tsitsipas and Alexander Zverev were both made to work hard for their victories.

The pair were each taken to consecutive tie-breaks, the Greek defeating Felix Auger-Aliassime 7-6 (7-3) 7-6 (7-3), while Zverev was pushed further still in a 7-6 (15-13) 7-6 (7-3) success against Jeremy Chardy.

Sixth seed Tsitsipas, who has won in Estoril and Marseille this year, will be favourite to overcome Hubert Hurkacz for a spot in the quarter-finals.

Zverev, seeded one place higher than Tsitsipas, faces Andrey Rublev as the German goes in search of a fourth Masters title.

 

SEEDS SAIL THROUGH 

Four other seeded players enjoyed straight-sets wins, with Karen Khachanov, Roberto Bautista Agut, Matteo Berrettini and David Goffin securing their progress.

Khachanov beat Taylor Fritz 6-2 6-4, Bautista Agut – runner up in 2016 – defeated Reilly Opelka 6-4 7-5 and Berrettini was a 6-3 6-3 winner over Christian Garin.

Goffin was 6-2 3-0 up against Mikhail Kukushkin when the Kazakhstani retired hurt.

Novak Djokovic's bid for a fifth Shanghai Masters title continued with an impressive 6-3 6-3 victory over Denis Shapovalov on Wednesday.

The reigning champion set up a last-16 clash with John Isner following a commanding display during which he dropped just one point on serve in the first set.

Shapovalov, ranked 36th in the world, had to fend off two break points in his opening service game as Djokovic sought to impose his authority early on.

It took until the eighth game for the 16-time grand slam champion to underline his superiority, Shapovalov's backhand clipping the net and going wide on break point to leave Djokovic serving for the set.

Having completed that task with the minimum of fuss – holding to love for the fourth time in five games – the Serbian was promptly met with sterner resistance in the second set.

Shapovalov emerged livelier and more aggressive, forcing the issue and being rewarded for his efforts with a break-point opening after darting to the net to swing a long rally in his favour.

But Djokovic remained resolute, maintaining a high first-serve percentage to tip the balance back in his favour and winning game point with a deft drop shot. 

And it was the world number one who struck what proved to be the telling blow in the fifth game, Shapovalov getting a first-hand look at what a world-class returner can do against even his most powerful serves.

Time and again Djokovic had the answer to whatever his rival could fire down and that pressure told as the top seed broke and consolidated for a 4-2 lead.

Djokovic hastened the end of the contest following a couple of brilliant winners and an unforced error from Shapovalov, who – serving to stay in the match – was simply outclassed.

An irritated Andy Murray accused Fabio Fognini of "hindrance" in their fiery second-round clash at the Shanghai Masters on Tuesday.

Three-time Shanghai champion Murray was annoyed by a loud noise, which he claims was made by Fognini, when he had a volley at the net for a 15-30 lead at 5-5 in the third set.

The Briton went on to break Fognini for a second chance to serve out the match, but at the changeover the pair were involved in a heated discussion.

When Murray complained about the noise to chair umpire Fergus Murphy and Fognini attempted to interject, the three-time major champion told his opponent to "shut up".

Murray was unable to close out the victory and Fognini, who had earlier been handed a code violation for hitting a ball into the stand and throwing his racket at a court-side chair, had the last laugh by sealing a 7-6 (7-4) 2-6 7-6 (7-2) triumph.

Asked about the incident, Murray said: "I had a volley on top of the net. Someone made a noise, I didn't know who made the noise.

"I looked in the direction of where the noise came from. He [Fognini] then told me, 'Stop looking at me, what are you looking at me for?' and I was like, 'I was just about to hit a shot and someone made a noise.'

"He was then telling me to stop looking at him. Normally when someone shouts during the middle of a point, which is pretty rare something like that happens, he told me to stop complaining, to have a sense of humour, that when you have a volley on top of the net you're not going to miss it.

"Well I know I'm not going to miss it but I wanted to know where the sound came from. It came from him, which you're not allowed to do, it's against the rules, it's hindrance, you shouldn't do it.

"He said I should have a sense of humour about it, but I would say in the moment neither of us were in a joking, laughing kind of mood. That was the issue."

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