Steve Hansen says Jordie Barrett has the "swagger" to "boss the game" at fly-half when New Zealand face Namibia in the Rugby World Cup on Sunday.

Barrett will don the famous All Blacks number 10 jersey for the first time in the Pool B encounter at Tokyo Stadium, where the defending champions should claim a bonus-point win to go top of Pool B and put one foot in the quarter-finals.

All three Barrett brothers scored tries in a 63-0 battering of Canada on Wednesday, making history by becoming the first siblings to play in the same New Zealand side at a World Cup.

Youngest brother Jordie has played as a full-back, centre and wing at international level, and New Zealand head coach Hansen says he can thrive as a makeshift fly-half in a much-changed side that will be captained by Sam Whitelock.

"I don't see him playing too often at 10," Hansen said. "But in the circumstances we've got, someone had to do it and he's our best choice.

"He's a back-three player, I think. As he gets older, he may end up in the midfield, but for me, he's a got a skillset ideally suited to the back three - he's got a big boot, he's good under the high ball, he's brave on the chase and he's got good handling skills.

"He's got plenty of swagger. That boy is not short of it. But I don't think you can mistake swagger or confidence for arrogance. He's not an arrogant boy, he's a humble kid.

"He'll be looking forward to it. I know he's excited by the challenge and he'll boss the game, because that's how he plays."

Fit-again lock Brodie Retallick will make his first appearance of the tournament for the holders.

Centre Johan Deysel returns to the starting line-up to lead a Namibia team which shows nine changes after the 57-3 thumping by South Africa.

First-choice fly-half Cliven Loubser plays no part as a result of an ankle injury suffered against the Springboks, so TC Kisting comes in at number 10.

 

PLAYERS TO WATCH

New Zealand - Brodie Retallick

Retallick returns ahead of schedule after a 10-week absence caused by a dislocated left shoulder. Hansen says he has been "counting down the days" for what is set to be a short comeback, with an eye on making a bigger impact later in the tournament.

Namibia - Johan Deysel

Centre Deysel recovered from a shoulder injury to come off the bench against South Africa and the centre will want to make his presence felt in midfield, with fond memories of scoring against New Zealand in the last World Cup.


KEY OPTA FACTS

- New Zealand have won their last 16 World Cup matches, the longest run of victories by any side in the history of the tournament.

- Namibia have played the most World Cup matches of any side yet to win a match at the tournament, losing each of their 21 fixtures.

- The All Blacks have won 13 of the 32 World Cup matches that have been won by 60 points or more, after their drubbing of Canada.

- The two nations have met in just one Test, that clash coming at the Olympic Stadium in London at the 2015 Rugby World Cup, with the All Blacks winning 58-14.

Brodie Retallick has been named to make his return for the All Blacks when they face Namibia at the Rugby World Cup on Sunday.

Retallick, 28, was initially in doubt for the tournament due to a dislocated shoulder suffered against South Africa in July.

However, the lock will make his return against Namibia in the Pool B encounter in Chofu.

"It's great to have Brodie back. There's been some great work done by not only Brodie himself but also by the medical team," All Blacks head coach Steve Hansen said in a statement on Friday.

"Obviously, Brodie is very excited to be in a position to pull the jersey back on."

Retallick's return is a huge boost for a New Zealand side who have won their opening two games of the tournament.

Jordie Barrett will start at fly-half for the All Blacks, who will be in action just four days after their 63-0 thrashing of Canada.

"In naming this team, we had to consider the short turnaround between the Canadian and Namibian games," Hansen said. "We've managed to ensure that we've got plenty of fresh players starting this match.

"We're very happy with where we are at after our first two games. However, the expectations going into the match on Sunday don't change. We need to keep improving. In all games it's important to nail the mental self-preparation, as it's not about who you're playing, it's about your own personal standards.

"Our preparation on-field this week is all about getting the balance right over the next two days. It's a case of not too much and not too little, from a physical point of view."

Samuel Whitelock will captain the All Blacks for a sixth time.

 

New Zealand: Ben Smith, Sevu Reece, Jack Goodhue, Anton Lienert-Brown, George Bridge, Jordie Barrett, Aaron Smith; Joe Moody, Codie Taylor, Nepo Laulala, Brodie Retallick, Samuel Whitelock, Shannon Frizell, Sam Cane, Ardie Savea.
Replacements: Dane Coles, Ofa Tuungafasi, Angus Ta'avao, Patrick Tuipulotu, Matt Todd, Brad Weber, TJ Perenara, Rieko Ioane.

Steve Hansen felt a much-changed New Zealand side set the benchmark during a devastating second-half burst in a 63-0 Rugby World Cup rout of Canada.

The All Blacks cruised to a nine-try victory on a humid Wednesday at Oita Stadium to go second in Pool B behind Italy after making a winning start to their title defence against South Africa.

Beauden Barrett, Scott Barrett and Jordie Barrett were among the try-scorers as they made history by becoming the first trio of brothers to play in the same All Blacks side in a World Cup match.

The defending champions showed Canada no mercy, scoring four tries in the space of nine minutes at the start of the second half, while Brad Weber grabbed a double before the hour mark and Richie Mo'unga was perfect from the tee in a one-sided encounter.

Head coach Hansen wants to see the All Blacks display such intensity throughout the rest of the tournament as they bid to lift the Webb Ellis Cup for an unprecedented third time in a row.

"It was a pretty good performance when you break it down. Particularly that first half of the second half they really came together and played good controlled rugby in difficult conditions," said Hansen.

"The humidity was unbelievable, people at home will be wondering why they are dropping a few balls, it's very, very difficult so I think they've done well."

He added: "We've got to put that first 20 minutes of the second half and turn it into 80 minutes, if we can do that we won't be too far away."

Canada boss Kingsley Jones was proud of his players despite such suffering such a mauling.

"I'm really proud of the guys with the way they stuck in. We had big chunks of the game where we were really in the game, we had opportunities between 16 and 36 minutes, but failed to capitalise," said Jones.

"The way we dug in for the last 20 minutes, I'm proud of the guys, they showed true Canadian grit and every one of themselves can look in the mirror and be proud of themselves."

The Barrett brothers celebrated making Rugby World Cup history by scoring a try apiece as ruthless holders New Zealand hammered Canada 63-0 at Oita Stadium on Wednesday.

Beauden Barrett, Jordie Barrett and Scott Barrett became the first siblings to play in the same All Blacks side in a World Cup and they all made their mark in a nine-try drubbing.

All three brothers touched down along with Sonny Bill Williams, Rieko Ioane, Shannon Frizell and Brad Weber (two) after New Zealand were awarded an early penalty try.

Five of the tries came in a spell of 16 second-half minutes as Steve Hansen's side ran riot to go second in Pool B behind Italy, after starting their quest to win the Web Ellis Cup for an unprecedented third consecutive time with a win over South Africa.

The outstanding Richie Mo'unga scored 16 points with the boot - nailing all eight conversions - and Ardie Savea became the first player to wear goggles in a World Cup match but whipped them off soon after coming on.

New Zealand made an ominous start with huge backing from an expectant crowd and Romain Poite awarded a penalty try with only four minutes gone, Gordon McRorie punished for trying to steal a ball while a scrum drove Canada beyond their own line.

Jordie Barrett took a crossfield kick from Mo'unga to add a second try and Williams stepped inside and ploughed over for another before turning provider for Beauden Barrett with a clever kick.

The humidity made the ball tricky to handle in the first half, but New Zealand shifted through the gears after the break to put on a show with conditions easing.

Williams darted between a couple of defenders before setting up a simple finish for Ioane and Scott Barrett rounded off a slick move after fumbling as he went to touch down in the first half.

Frizell went over following an initial break from Ioane and New Zealand had four tries in the first 10 minutes of the second half when the rapid Beauden Barrett sprinted 60 metres to lay on a first Test try for Weber.

Mo'unga started that move with a brilliant take and offload, and the magnificent fly-half slipped in Weber for a double before maintaining his 100 per cent record from the tee.

Beauden Barrett missed out on a brace when he dropped the ball running clear right at the end, but that would have been no consolation for battered Canada.

 

Mo'unga magic makes Canada suffer

Mo'unga showed New Zealand's strength in depth with a brilliant performance at number 10, showing great vision and skill with ball in hand and producing a flawless display with the boot.

Full-back masterclass from brilliant Beauden

Beauden Barrett showed his class at full-back with a superb all-round display, taking high balls, charging through the Canada defence with a sharp turn of foot and also performing his defensive duties magnificently - the highlight being a great saving tackle to deny Peter Nelson a first-half try.

Key Opta Facts:

- New Zealand have won each of their six Tests against Canada, with their last five victories in that run coming by margins of 50-plus points.
- The All Blacks have won each of their last 16 Rugby World Cup matches, the longest run by any side in the tournament's history, while they also boast a 100 per cent win rate in pool stage matches at the World Cup (30/30).
- This is the 32nd time that a match has been won by 60-plus points at the Rugby World Cup, New Zealand have been the winning side in 13 of those matches, over twice as many as any other side (England, Australia both five). 
- All three Barrett brothers scored a try in the same game for New Zealand for the first time; Beauden and Jordie Barrett had crossed the try line in the same game once before (v Italy in November 2018).
- Sonny Bill Williams and Sam Whitelock have each won their last 16 Rugby World Cup games, equaling Keven Mealamu for the all-time record of consecutive wins at the tournament.

What's next?

The holders will be expected to rack up another big score against Namibia on Sunday, while Canada will be in for another daunting encounter with the Springboks two days later.

Steve Hansen is hopeful Beauden Barrett's performance levels will improve even further playing alongside his brothers in New Zealand's next pool match at the Rugby World Cup.

The All Blacks began their campaign with victory over South Africa, in the process taking a huge early step towards the knockout stages of the tournament.

Their next outing is against Canada; while it is expected to be a more straightforward affair, Hansen has still named a strong New Zealand side.

Included in the XV are brothers Beauden, Jordie and Scott Barrett, becoming just the second trio of siblings to start together in a World Cup match - after Tonga's Vunipola brothers in 2015.

Beauden Barrett is a two-time World Rugby Player of the Year and starred against the Springboks, playing at full-back rather than his usual position of fly-half.

Yet Hansen is optimistic the 28-year-old will be inspired to produce an even more impressive display in familiar company.

"We know he's got all the skills in the world but he's in a hurry, you know," Hansen said. "He's got two brothers who are ahead of him.

"If you're in a contest with your siblings, you're always in a hurry - because you want to prove to not only yourself but your two siblings and everybody else that you're better than they are."

Hansen is also excited to see Jordie Barrett out on the field against Canada, although he acknowledges there are areas of the 22-year-old's game that still need honing.

"He's a very confident young man is our Jordie - and he has every right to be confident," the coach said. "He's a very skilled player.

"It's not his confidence that we need to get right, it's just his understanding and his pace of how he wants to play. He wants to do it at 100 miles an hour.

"We've talked about that before in the media and he's making good progress, so we're pretty excited by where he's going to end up one day."

Were Canada to get any sort of result against the All Blacks, it would go down as one of the biggest upsets in World Cup history.

But Hansen admitted he had enjoyed taking in another shock result at the weekend when Japan defeated Ireland, who are seen by many as one of the major rivals for New Zealand's crown.

"You wouldn't get a better game of rugby. I thought [Japan] were outstanding in their performance," Hansen said.

"And their speed of ball was great, their line speed was awesome, they just kept coming, didn't they? Time after time after time and showed a lot of courage, a lot of intent, and a lot of skills.

"So hats off to them, it was a really great performance and one that the whole of Japan should be proud of."


PLAYERS TO WATCH

New Zealand - Beauden Barrett

Barrett is a joy to watch at the best of times given his outstanding speed, but the opportunity to take on inferior opponents like Canada should see him really make hay. If the makeshift full-back lifts his level even further as Hansen suggests, the Canucks could be in real trouble.

Canada - Conor Trainor

This match comes eight years to the day since the sides' previous World Cup meeting, in which Trainor also played. In fact, not only did he play but he also scored - twice. Trainor is the only player to have tallied a pair of tries against the All Blacks in the World Cup in the 21st century. A repeat would make for some story.


KEY OPTA FACTS

- New Zealand have won each of their previous five Tests against Canada, with their most recent four victories in that run coming by 50 points or more.
- The All Blacks have won each of their last 15 Rugby World Cup matches, the longest run by any side in the tournament's history.
- They also boast a 100 per cent win rate in pool stage matches at the World Cup (29/29).
- New Zealand have scored at least one try in each of their past 27 World Cup matches, a record for any nation in the tournament, last failing to do so against South Africa in 1999.
- Canada are winless in their past eight World Cup matches. Prior to this run, they had never gone more than four matches without victory in the tournament.

Beauden, Scott and Jordie Barrett will become the first trio of brothers to start for New Zealand when the All Blacks face Canada at the Rugby World Cup.

Wednesday's Pool B fixture against Canada at Oita Stadium will see the Barrett siblings become just the second trio of brothers to start in a World Cup match after the Tongan Vunipola brothers in 1995.

All Blacks star Beauden Barrett and brother Scott retain their places in the XV following the world champions' opening victory over South Africa, with head coach Steve Hansen making 11 changes.

New Zealand veteran Sonny Bill Williams is handed his first start of the showpiece tournament, along with Rieko Ioane, while TJ Perenara also slots into the line-up.

"Our aim is to win the next two Pool matches against Canada and Namibia, as well as continuing to grow our game and manage the workload across the group. With two games four days apart, it's obvious that we need to use our whole squad," Hansen said.

"Whilst there's a huge amount of energy and excitement amongst the whole team about what lies ahead, this week there has been a real focus on ourselves and our own standards.

"We've been working hard. We know we have to keep growing our game. We've always been demanding of ourselves when it comes to continued improvement, and that will never change. By doing so, it allows us to have the right attitude, intent and execution.

"When it comes to our preparation, it should never be about who we are playing, but how we are preparing individually and as a team, both mentally and physically. By doing this, it means you always respect your opponent and the jersey."

 

New Zealand: Beauden Barrett, Jordie Barrett, Jack Goodhue, Sonny Bill Williams, Rieko Ioane, Richie Mo'unga, TJ Perenara; Atu Moli, Liam Coltman, Angus Ta'avao, Patrick Tuipulotu, Scott Barrett, Shane Frizell, Matt Todd, Kieran Read.
Replacements: Codie Taylor, Ofa Tuungafasi, Nepo Laulala, Samuel Whitelock, Ardie Savea, Brad Weber, Ryan Crotty, Ben Smith.

Jonny Bairstow has been left out of England's Test squad for the tour of New Zealand in November.

The Yorkshire batsman is in the 15-man Twenty20 group but misses out on the two-match series against the Black Caps, having failed to impress during the 2-2 Ashes draw with Australia on home soil.

Dominic Sibley has won a first call-up after an exceptional County Championship with Warwickshire, alongside Matt Parkinson, Zak Crawley and Saqib Mahmood.

Lancashire's Parkinson and Worcestershire seamer Pat Brown are included in the T20 squad for the first time, as is Tom Banton, who hit 549 runs for Somerset in the Vitality Blast.

Injured trio James Anderson, Mark Wood and Olly Stone are left out, the former now working on being fit for the tour of South Africa, which starts in December.

The two Tests against New Zealand, due to start on November 21 and 29, do not form part of the ICC World Test Championship.

The five-match T20I series gets underway in Christchurch on November 1.

England Test squad:

Joe Root (captain), Jofra Archer, Stuart Broad, Rory Burns, Jos Buttler, Zak Crawley, Sam Curran, Joe Denly, Jack Leach, Saqib Mahmood, Matt Parkinson, Ollie Pope, Dominic Sibley, Ben Stokes, Chris Woakes.

England T20 squad:

Eoin Morgan (captain), Jonny Bairstow, Tom Banton, Sam Billings, Pat Brown, Sam Curran, Tom Curran, Joe Denly, Lewis Gregory, Chris Jordan, Saqib Mahmood, Dawid Malan, Matt Parkinson, Adil Rashid, James Vince.

Steve Hansen is confident there is more to come from New Zealand after they kicked off their Rugby World Cup defence with an impressive 23-13 victory over South Africa.

The All Blacks had to withstand plenty of pressure in the opening quarter of their Pool B opener in Yokohama, but they seized control of the game in a stunning six-minute spell featuring tries for George Bridge and Scott Barrett.

Although South Africa fought back impressively after the interval, New Zealand were able to remain ahead and extend their streak of never losing a World Cup pool game.

"We're pretty happy with where we're at at the moment," said coach Hansen in his post-match news conference. "Everybody knew that this was going to be a big match and obviously it was. Both teams played very well at times and we're very happy to come out with a win.

"Were we perfect? No. But you're never gonna be at this stage of the tournament and that was the interesting part about this game for both teams.

"You're not in the swing of the tournament and right from the get-go you've got probably the biggest game of the group. We've come out on top. [I'm] very happy that we did, but there's plenty of stuff we can work on."

South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus highlighted New Zealand's discipline as a key factor in the outcome.

"Discipline was always going to be a massive thing for us," said All Blacks skipper Kieran Read.

"South Africa love to build pressure through those penalties and they've got a kicker like [Handre] Pollard who showed right from the outset he can kick from 50 metres.

"It was a conscious decision from us to make sure we didn't give away too many penalties and we probably haven't been as smart throughout this whole year, but we were at a different level today."

Rassie Erasmus felt South Africa's Rugby World Cup defeat to New Zealand owed much to the All Blacks' superior discipline.

The Springboks applied plenty of pressure in the first quarter of Saturday's blockbuster Pool B opener but saw their 3-0 lead quickly turn into a 17-3 deficit, the defending world champions hitting top gear in a stunning six-minute blitz.

A Pieter-Steph du Toit try and Handre Pollard's second penalty gave South Africa hope after the interval, only for Richie Mo'unga and Beauden Barrett to land three-pointers as New Zealand triumphed 23-13.

In a post-match news conference, Erasmus said: "I think they won it. I don't think we lost it. Two tries to one, they definitely deserved to win the game.

"If you concede, I think, 11 penalties to two, you're going to struggle to beat New Zealand. I think discipline was our biggest downfall. I don't think we can moan about anything.

"As I said, I think the penalty count was 11-2, so we did 11 things wrong. We have to go and fix it. They only did two things wrong, which is unbelievably well disciplined by them. That battle, we lost.

"I give all credit to New Zealand. When we had territorial and scoreboard pressure and they had that one opportunity to pounce, they pounced."

No team has ever won the World Cup after losing in the pool stage, but Erasmus believes his side can buck that trend.

"I think we can fight back. I think even in the game we fought back," he stated. "To be down 17-3 and get back to 17-13 and being in their 22 ... there were stages when we really fought back well."

With a smile, he added: "If you're grouped with New Zealand in your pool, you've got a good chance of not going undefeated through your pool.

"And then you have to fight back and try and get to the final, for the first time in history not being unbeaten. We have to go [down] that route now."

Erasmus said Trevor Nyakane (calf) was the only Springboks player to pick up an injury, attributing late concerns over Cheslin Kolbe and Du Toit to cramp.

New Zealand were far from perfect in their Rugby World Cup opener, but a six-minute spell of breathtaking brilliance showed why the two-time defending champions remain the team to beat.

While the All Blacks are understandably many people's favourites to prevail in Japan, it is fair to say their status as rugby's dominant nation has come under more questioning than usual in recent months.

South Africa won this year's Rugby Championship, in which Steve Hansen's men suffered a stunning 47-26 defeat to Australia - albeit one they avenged the following week with a 36-0 thumping of the Wallabies to retain the Bledisloe Cup.

The All Blacks have also been displaced by Ireland at the top of World Rugby's rankings and the likes of Wales and England have been tipped to mount strong challenges for glory over the coming weeks.

For 20 minutes on Saturday, any doubts over New Zealand's strength were heightened as South Africa started superbly in a blockbuster Pool B opener in Yokohama that could well serve as a dress rehearsal for the final at the same venue on November 2.

Throughout the first quarter, the Springboks dominated territorially, their ferocious line-speed causing no end of problems.

However, one misplaced pass from Faf de Klerk - with South Africa leading 3-0 - triggered a sudden shift in momentum as the All Blacks demonstrated a ruthless streak no other team can match.

The Boks initially got off lightly when De Klerk's wild pass from a ruck was pounced upon by Richie Mo'unga, who kicked ahead before being halted just short of the line. Makazole Mapimpi was penalised for not releasing the number 10, but the wing avoided a yellow card and the All Blacks merely picked up three points to level the score when a try had appeared highly likely.

New Zealand had found their mojo, though, and in a matter of minutes they took complete control with two stunning tries in quick succession.

Hansen's decision to start Beauden Barrett - widely viewed as the world's finest fly-half - at full-back in order to accommodate Mo'unga has prompted much debate, but the presence of two playmakers was certainly influential as the All Blacks hit top gear.

Mo'unga's cross-field kick to Sevu Reece started the move that led to the first try. Reece promptly skinned the out-of-position Mapimpi before working the ball through Aaron Smith to a galloping Ardie Savea. From the next phase, Barrett surged through a gap from second receiver and laid on a simple finish for George Bridge.

Barrett was also heavily involved in the passage of play that led up to the All Blacks' second score, which was finished by namesake Scott Barrett after Anton Lienert-Brown had dazzlingly weaved past five defenders.

Having been 3-0 down and on the rack, New Zealand were suddenly 14 points to the good and their opponents understandably appeared somewhat stunned for the remainder of the half.

To their credit, the Springboks did battle back gamely after the interval, but they had been left with too much to do.

It has been 12 years since the All Blacks last lost a World Cup fixture. Their magical six-minute blitz on Saturday suggests it will take something special to deny them another title.

Kieran Read was pleased with the clinical edge New Zealand showed as they saw off South Africa 23-13 in their opening game at the Rugby World Cup.

The Springboks started the highly anticipated Pool B clash in Yokohama - which will also host the final - positively but only scored three points through Handre Pollard during their period of dominance.

When Richie Mo'unga set upon a loose pass from Faf de Klerk and was illegally challenged by Makazole Mapimpi, the fly-half restored parity and kick-started a six-minute spell in which the reigning champions racked up 17 points.

George Bridge scored his eighth try in six Tests before a handling error from Pollard preceded Scott Barrett running in the All Blacks' second.

Pieter-Steph du Toit made the most of some slack New Zealand defending after the restart and Pollard was successful with a drop-goal from distance, but Mo'unga and Beauden Barrett kept the Springboks at arm's length from the tee.

"It was a heck of Test match. It was the full 80 minutes that we had to work," said All Blacks skipper Read.

"You're fortunate [that] sometimes it just happens in those couple of moments and we managed to take them. That's probably the difference in the game.

"We had to defend a little bit early on and when you don't have the ball you can't do too much, so when we did get opportunities we wanted to try to speed the game up."

Springboks skipper Siya Kolisi was frustrated his team did not punish New Zealand further when they had the chance, having reduced their arrears to four points in the second half.

"I think we took too long to get into the game," said Kolisi, despite his side appearing to be firmly on top during the first quarter.

"I think we stuck to our guns and our plan worked in the second half. We wanted to score first and it happened, but we couldn't capitalise on our opportunities."

Beauden Barrett, who started at full-back, played on with a bloody nose after being hit in the face by Duane Vermeulen's boot when trying to tackle the forward.

Barrett said: "It's a bit sore. It's never good getting a boot to the nose, especially from a big lad like Duane. You expect to take a few bumps when you play the Springboks, so it was worth it.

"We got to throw the ball around a bit – sometimes too much, it was a bit greasy out there, but there was some expansive rugby. If we can keep doing that all tournament that's what we're here for."

New Zealand were unforgiving as they punished South Africa errors to get their Rugby World Cup title defence under way with a thrilling 23-13 victory in the blockbuster Pool B clash in Yokohama.

Rugby Championship winners South Africa had been tipped as the leading contenders to dethrone New Zealand in Japan and they piled the pressure on the All Blacks in the early stages.

However, they only had three points from Handre Pollard to show for their efforts before sloppiness set in during a six-minute blitz that included tries from George Bridge and Scott Barrett.

Pieter-Steph du Toit crossed and Pollard scored a fine drop-goal as the Springboks regained a foothold in the second half, but the All Blacks were able to retain their record of having never lost a group stage match.

Pollard split the posts in the second minute after Bridge was pinged for not releasing the ball, and the Springboks maintained their commanding start.

He then hit the upright from the tee after Faf de Klerk intelligently won another penalty, but the scrum-half's stray pass was pounced on by Richie Mo'unga and Makazole Mapimpi's illegal attempt to win it back led to the fly-half restoring parity.

The champions had clicked into gear and Mo'unga's cross-field kick enabled Sevu Reece to charge down the right, setting a move in motion that ended with Beauden Barrett darting through a gap and offloading for Bridge to score his eighth try in six Tests.

New Zealand punished another mistake when Pollard dropped a high ball and Anton Lienert-Brown skipped in off the right before sending Scott Barrett under the posts, while Mo'unga missed a chance to make it 20-3 at the break from the left touchline.

Du Toit took advantage of a defensive lapse from the All Blacks to run straight in from a ruck in the 48th minute and Pollard reduced the arrears to four points with a stunning drop-goal from 40 yards out.

Mo'unga slotted through another penalty and the boot of Beauden Barrett helped keep the Springboks at bay as New Zealand extended their winning run in World Cups to 15 matches.

 

De Klerk opens the door

South Africa were in complete control until De Klerk's sloppy pass was set upon by Mo'unga, and it proved to be the turning point. New Zealand added 17 points in the next five minutes to underline their status as favourites for the trophy, with Rassie Erasmus likely to have concerns over the fitness of Trevor Nyakane and Cheslin Kolbe after late injuries.

Barrett at full-back pays off

Hansen's decision to play Mo'unga at fly-half and Beauden Barrett at 15 paid dividends, with both playing important roles as playmakers as the All Blacks tore South Africa apart in the first half. The latter was then granted the chance to play the last 10 minutes in his favoured position.

What's next?

The Springboks return to action against neighbours Namibia in Toyota next Saturday, while the All Blacks must wait until October 2 to take on Canada in Oita.

South Africa have one of the great names in sport on their side as they prepare to begin their Rugby World Cup campaign against New Zealand.

The Springboks will take on the defending champions on Saturday and they can count on New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady for support.

NFL great Brady is an American, and the United States are in the competition, albeit in a different pool, but he is backing South Africa.

The 42-year-old sent a video clip to the Springboks, who posted it on their Twitter page, in which he said: "Springboks, good luck to you in Japan. Kick some butt. Go Bok!"

As South Africa's caption noted: "Can't go wrong with the GOAT in your corner."

South Africa captain Siya Kolisi warned his side that defeat to New Zealand in their Rugby World Cup opener will turn every other pool match into a final.

The Proteas were famously stunned in their first game of the 2015 tournament, going down 34-32 to this year's hosts Japan in one of the greatest shocks of all time.

Rassie Erasmus' men face the reigning world champions on Saturday in Yokohama and Kolisi knows how important it is for the Springboks to make a strong start, having been humiliated in England four years ago.

"We are a very different team now – different coaching staff. We don't want to start like that and we have an opposition who also wants to start well," said Kolisi, whose side will also face Italy, Namibia and Canada in Pool B.

"There is a huge history behind us and we have learned from the past, so we have shown as much respect as we can to New Zealand, and have worked hard on our stuff.

"It makes it really tough if you lose your first game, because then basically every game is like a final."

Loose forward Kolisi cited the breakdown as a key battleground against the All Blacks, who triumphed when the two met in Pretoria last year, with flankers Sam Cane and Ardie Savea the men to watch.

"I know how good they are, I have played against them for a while. Me and Sam Cane played in the U20s, so I have seen him for quite a while. We chat and learn a few things from each other, but you can’t wait for the ref to help you at the breakdown," he said.

"Ardie has the most steals in Super Rugby, so we are going to have to sort it out ourselves and get in there quickly.

"That is where they were strong in the game in Pretoria last year – that's where they won the game."

The last meeting between the two sides was the 16-16 Rugby Championship draw in July. 

New Zealand will need to hit the ground running in their bid to win a third successive Rugby World Cup, as they begin their campaign in Pool B against South Africa on Saturday.

While hosts Japan and Russia kick off the 2019 edition of the tournament on Friday, it is tough not to look past that opening fixture and focus instead on the mouthwatering battle between two rugby heavyweights in Yokohama.

Champions in 2011 and 2015, the All Blacks are on a 14-match World Cup winning streak and are favourites to lift the Webb Ellis Cup on November 2.

However, the Springboks held their opponents to a 16-16 draw in Wellington earlier this year on their way to winning the Rugby Championship for the first time since 2009, albeit it was a shortened season in a World Cup year.

Still, South Africa are seen by many as the main challengers to the reigning champions, even if All Blacks captain Kieran Read is confident his side know exactly what they will be up against.

"There is nothing special about the way they play. They do what they do well," he told the media. "They are physical‚ they're kicking well and they take the points when they're on offer using their strengths like their maul.

"They also have the ability to play off counter-attack and turn over ball from their backs. We know what is coming our way and that's great.

"We are in a good place to put a plan out that we think is going to match it."

A defeat would by no means be a hammer blow to either team's hopes - South Africa lost their first game four years ago to Japan but still made the semi-finals, where they lost 20-18 to New Zealand - but finishing second in the group may, if things run according to form, lead to a tricky quarter-final tie with Ireland.

The Boks will honour Chester Williams this weekend, wearing a jersey with the 1995 World Cup winner's image embedded into the numbers on the back. Williams died a fortnight ago, at the age of 49.

"Chester didn't like being the centre of attention," said South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus. "He never bragged about his role or expected anything for it, but he would have enjoyed being part of a Springbok-All Black Test match once more, I think."

Having called for a more balance approach to officiating at the World Cup, Erasmus has selected the same XV that were on duty for the 41-7 win over Japan in South Africa's final warm-up fixture, meaning Duane Vermeulen will appear in his 50th Test.

New Zealand head coach Steve Hansen, meanwhile, named Richie Mo'unga at fly-half on Thursday with Ryan Crotty and Anton Lienert-Brown in the centres, meaning Sonny Bill Williams is on a powerful bench.

 

PLAYERS TO WATCH

New Zealand - Beauden Barrett

So often the first-choice number 10, the brilliant Barrett will line up at full-back against South Africa. His selection there gives New Zealand an extra playmaking option in a back division that includes inexperienced wing duo George Bridge and Sevu Reece.

South Africa - Handre Pollard

Read and the rest of the All Blacks may know what to expect from their rivals, but they still need to find a way to nullify South Africa's threat. To that extent, fly-half Pollard's kicking game - both in open play and also off the tee - will be pivotal if the Boks are to prosper.


KEY OPTA FACTS

- The All Blacks have won 16 of their last 20 games against the Springboks. Each of the last four meetings have been decided by a margin of no greater than two points.

- New Zealand's run of 14 successive World Cup wins is the longest such streak by any nation in the tournament's history.

- South Africa have lost three of their last eight World Cup fixtures, as many as they had lost in their 28 World Cup outings previously.

- New Zealand have scored at least one try in each of their last 26 World Cup outings. The last opponents to prevent them crossing the line? South Africa, back in 1999.

- Barrett beat the most defenders (16) of any player in the 2019 Rugby Championship. His 47 carries for 202 metres gained gave him the second highest totals in those categories.

- South Africa's Pieter-Steph du Toit made the most tackles (36) of any player in the Rugby Championship, as well as the most clean breaks (5) by any forward in the campaign.

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